2004 Indianapolis 500

Last updated
88th Indianapolis 500
2004 Indianapolis 500.svg
Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Indianapolis 500
Sanctioning body Indy Racing League
Season 2004 IndyCar season
DateMay 30, 2004
Winner Buddy Rice
(450 miles due to rain)
Winning team Rahal Letterman Racing
Average speed138.518 mph
Pole position Buddy Rice
Pole speed222.024 mph
Fastest qualifierRice
Rookie of the Year Kosuke Matsuura
Most laps led Buddy Rice (91)
Pre-race ceremonies
National anthem Jessica Simpson
"Back Home Again in Indiana" Jim Nabors
Starting Command Mari Hulman George
Pace car Chevrolet Corvette
Pace car driver Morgan Freeman
StarterBryan Howard
Honorary starter Nick Lachey
Estimated attendance300,000 (estimated)
TV in the United States
Network ABC
Announcers Paul Page, Scott Goodyear, Jack Arute
Nielsen Ratings 4.7 / 11
Chronology
PreviousNext
2003 2005

The 88th Indianapolis 500 was held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana on Sunday, May 30, 2004. It was part of the 2004 IndyCar Series season and the ninth Indy 500 sanctioned by the Indy Racing League. Buddy Rice won the pole position, the pit stop contest, led the most laps, and won the race for team owners Bobby Rahal and David Letterman.

Indianapolis Motor Speedway Motorsport track in the Indianapolis, IN, USA

The Indianapolis Motor Speedway is an automobile racing circuit located in Speedway, Indiana, in the United States. It is the home of the Indianapolis 500 and the Brickyard 400, and formerly the home of the United States Grand Prix. It is located on the corner of 16th Street and Georgetown Road, approximately six miles (10 km) west of Downtown Indianapolis.

Speedway, Indiana Town in Indiana, United States

Speedway is a town in Wayne Township, Marion County, Indiana, United States. The population was 11,812 at the 2010 census. Speedway is home of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway; it is an enclave of Indianapolis.

IndyCar Auto racing sanctioning body for North American open wheel racing

INDYCAR, LLC, is an American-based auto racing sanctioning body for Indy car racing and other disciplines of open wheel car racing. The organization sanctions four racing series: the premier IndyCar Series with its centerpiece the Indianapolis 500, and developmental series Indy Lights, the Indy Pro 2000 Championship and the U.S. F2000 National Championship, which are all a part of The Road To Indy. IndyCar is recognized as a member organization of the FIA through ACCUS.

Contents

The race began about two hours behind schedule due to a morning rain delay. After 27 laps had been completed, rain began to fall again and threatened to wash out the rest of the day. About two hours later, the rain had ceased, and the track was dried. The race resumed on lap 28, and cruised beyond the halfway point to make the race official. At the 150-lap mark, the race had been very competitive up to that point, but was destined to come down to the final round of pit stops to decide the winner. Moreover, dark skies were looming, and inclement weather was moving back into the area. The race appeared to be turning into a crap-shoot. Some leaders headed for the pits for their final pit stops. At the same time, a handful of teams gambled by staying out, in hopes that they could stretch their fuel and be leading the race when the approaching rain arrived.

Despite desperate attempts to prevail over the approaching rain storm, all of the leaders ultimately were forced to cycle through their final round of pit stops. Nobody was able to stretch their fuel long enough to beat the rain. Buddy Rice, who had led the most laps thus far, re-emerged as the leader. The race was ended after 450 miles (180 laps), just 50 miles (20 laps) short of the scheduled distance. A severe thunderstorm, which eventually strengthened into an F2 tornado, formed in the area of the speedway, shutting the track down, and sending the spectators and competitors for cover. Buddy Rice was declared the winner, his first victory in championship-level competition.

Buddy Rice American racing driver

Buddy Rice is an American racecar driver. He is best known for winning the 2004 Indianapolis 500 while driving for Rahal Letterman Racing, and the 2009 24 Hours of Daytona for Brumos Racing.

Race schedule

Race schedule — April/May 2004
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
25
 
26
ROP
27
 
28
 
29
 
30
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
7
 
8
Mini-Marathon
9
Practice
10
Practice
11
Practice
12
Practice
13
Practice
14
Practice
15
Pole Day
16
Time Trials
17
 
18
 
19
Practice
20
Practice
21
Practice
22
Practice
23
Bump Day
24
 
25
 
26
 
27
Carb Day
28
 
29
Parade
30
Indy 500
31
Memorial Day
     
ColorNotes
GreenPractice
Dark BlueTime trials
SilverRace day
RedRained out*
BlankNo track activity

*Includes days where track activity
was significantly limited due to rain

ROP — denotes Rookie Orientation Program

Practice

Rules changes were implemented before the start of the season, which reduced engine displacement from 3.5 L down to 3.0 L. In addition, on-board capacity of fuel was reduced from 35 gallons down to 30. The changes were made in an effort to curtail speeds, which had crept up into the low 230 mph range in 2003. It was also in the wake of a fatal accident at the Speedway. On October 22, 2003, during an off-season tire test, Tony Renna was killed in a crash. On a cool 50 degree morning, Renna spun in turn three, became airborne, and crashed into the outside wall and catch fence. The car was heavily damaged, and Renna died of massive internal trauma.

Litre non-SI unit of volume

The litre or liter is a metric system unit of volume which is a non-SI unit mentioned in the SI. It is equal to 1 cubic decimetre (dm3), 1,000 cubic centimetres (cm3) or 1/1,000 cubic metre. A cubic decimetre occupies a volume of 10 cm × 10 cm × 10 cm and is thus equal to one-thousandth of a cubic metre.

Gallon general topic for different units of volume called gallon

The gallon is a unit of measurement for volume and fluid capacity in both the US customary units and the British imperial systems of measurement. Three significantly different sizes are in current use:

2003 Indianapolis 500 87th running of the Indianapolis 500 motor race

The 87th Indianapolis 500 was held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana on Sunday, May 25, 2003. Two-time defending champion Hélio Castroneves won the pole position and was trying to become the first driver in Indy history to win three in a row. With 31 laps to go, however, Castroneves was passed by his Penske teammate Gil de Ferran, and the duo finished 1–2, with de Ferran winning his first Indy 500.

For the first time, single-point refueling rigs were allowed. [1] During pit stops, teams were now allowed to utilize a single combined fuel/vent hose assembly. This eliminated the need for a separate vent hose and dedicated vent hose operator, improving safety. [2]

Rookie Orientation

Rookie orientation was held April 26, with seven drivers participating. Newcomers Ed Carpenter, Kosuke Matsuura, Mark Taylor, and Luis Díaz passed all four phases of the rookie tests. Jeff Simmons and Marty Roth passed three phases, and can pass the fourth phase during routine practice.

Ed Carpenter (racing driver) American racecar driver

Everette Edward Carpenter, Jr. is an American auto racing driver, currently competing in the IndyCar Series for his own team, Ed Carpenter Racing. He is the stepson of Indy Racing League founder Tony George.

Kosuke Matsuura Japanese racing driver

Kosuke Matsuura is a race car driver currently competing in the Super GT series. He previously competed in the Formula Nippon and IRL IndyCar Series.

Mark Taylor (racing driver) racing driver

Mark Taylor is a racing driver who drove in the Indy Racing League IndyCar Series. He drove in the 2004 season for two different teams.

Larry Foyt participated, but due to previous high-speed oval experience, was exempted from needing to pass the four-phase test. [3] [4]

Larry Foyt American racing driver

Lawrence Joseph Roberds Foyt is a semi-retired NASCAR and IndyCar driver. He is the biological grandson and adopted son of A. J. Foyt, and a biological cousin of A. J. Foyt IV. His biological mother is Terry Lynn Foyt, daughter of A. J. Foyt, who divorced his biological father Larry Gene Roberds when he was an infant. He also drove in the 2004, 2005, and the 2006 Indianapolis 500 for A. J. Foyt Enterprises.

Carpenter led the speed chart at 215.584 mph. Though Díaz passed the rookie test, he did not return with Ganassi for practice come May.

Sunday May 9

Scott Dixon led the speed chart with a lap of 219.760 mph on opening day. No incidents were reported.

Monday May 10

Track remained closed most of the afternoon, due to thunder storms. The track re-opened just before 5 p.m. and Hélio Castroneves set the fastest lap of the month at 220.300 mph. Late in the day, Robby Gordon spun and hit the outside wall in turn 2 but was uninjured.

Tuesday May 11

Felipe Giaffone brushed the wall in the north chute, then slid along the wall to the entrance to the pits. He was uninjured. Adrián Fernández became the first driver of the month to break the 221 mph barrier but Kosuke Matsuura (221.857 mph) ended up with the fastest lap of the day.

Wednesday May 12

Tony Kanaan drove the fastest lap of the month, at 222.668 mph.

Thursday May 13

Rain kept the track closed until 3 p.m. The session was ended about 10 minutes early when Scott Sharp crashed in turn 1. Hélio Castroneves turned the fastest lap of the day (221.156 mph). Buddy Rice was among the top 5 for the first time all week.

"Fast" Friday May 14

The track opened at 11 a.m. but lasted only four minutes, as rain began falling and closed the track for the day. During the brief session, only four cars had entered the track with Sarah Fisher (212.616 mph) the only car to run a single lap at speed.

Time trials: weekend 1

Pole Day - Saturday May 15

Pole day dawned cool and damp. Overnight rain kept the track closed until shortly after 12 noon. During the first practice session, Tony Kanaan reached 223.224 mph, the fastest lap of the month.

Pole qualifying began at 2:15 p.m. Roger Yasukawa earned the distinction as the first driver in the field. Shortly after, Robby Gordon qualified his car and immediately boarded a plane to Richmond to participate in the NASCAR event that evening. At 3:06 p.m., Dan Wheldon placed himself on the provisional pole position after a qualifying run of 221.524 mph. Several wave offs and two wrecks (Bryan Herta and Felipe Giaffone) characterized the early attempts.

At 4:14 p.m., Buddy Rice took over the pole position with a run of 222.024 mph. Rice held off late runs by Dario Franchitti and Tony Kanaan to secure his first Indy 500 pole. At the end of the day, the field was filled to 22 cars.

Second Day - Sunday May 16

Four cars completed attempts to fill the field to 26 cars. After wrecking the day before, both Bryan Herta and Felipe Giaffone put their cars safely in the field. Herta was the fastest qualifier of the afternoon.

Practice: week 2

Wednesday May 19

Mark Taylor brushed the wall in turn 2, but suffered only minor damage. Scott Dixon led all drivers at 220.576 mph, while Marty Roth was the fastest of the non-qualified cars (212.292 mph).

Thursday May 20

A. J. Foyt IV spun in turn 3 and brushed the inside wall, suffering minor damage. Kosuke Matsuura was the fastest of the day (220.784 mph). Marty Roth once again led the non-qualified cars (212.352 mph).

Friday May 21

Adrián Fernández topped the speed chart at 218.257 mph. Meanwhile, Buddy Lazier joined DRR to drive the #24 car (which later became #91 in a joint entry with Hemelgarn). On his first day of track activity, Lazier led non-qualified cars at 215.513 mph.

Saturday May 22

The final full day of practice saw heavy activity. P. J. Jones took to the track for the first time but only managed 208 mph. Buddy Lazier led the non-qualified car at over 214 mph.

Time trials - weekend 2

Bump Day - Sunday May 23

The final day of qualifying saw seven positions open in the field. P. J. Jones was the first car to qualify (213.355 mph), followed by Marty Roth and others. At 1:45 p.m., Greg Ray filled the field to 33 cars with a run of 216.641 mph; the fastest attempt of the afternoon.

A short rain shower followed, with Robby McGehee sitting on the bubble as the slowest qualifier at 211.631 mph. At that point, it did not appear that any further cars would attempt to qualify. The only driver left on the sidelines was Jaques Lazier, who briefly practiced during the week for Foyt. However, the ride fizzled.

During the afternoon, Tony Stewart came to visit the track. He was running full-time in NASCAR, and had raced in the NEXTEL All-Star Challenge the night prior. A. J. Foyt reportedly called Stewart while he was at the track and invited him to practice in one of his back-up cars. Stewart quickly passed his physical and went to the pit area to prepare for a possible qualifying attempt. With little else going on during the afternoon, the rumors quickly buzzed around the track and throngs of media surrounded Stewart to cover the breaking story.

With about an hour left in the day, a car was prepared for Stewart and fired up on pit lane. Stewart had yet to climb in the car but was suited up in his drivers uniform. At 5:36 p.m., however, Stewart left the pits on foot and announced he would not make an attempt to qualify. Stewart's contracts with Joe Gibbs Racing, Home Depot, and Chevrolet precluded him from driving Foyt's Toyota Indy car.

Carb Day - Thursday May 26

The final practice was held Thursday May 26. Rahal Letterman Racing with driver Buddy Rice and chief mechanic Ricardo Nault won the Checkers/Rally's Pit Stop Challenge

Starting Grid

RowInsideMiddleOutside
115 Flag of the United States.svg Buddy Rice 26 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Dan Wheldon 27 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Dario Franchitti
236 Flag of Brazil.svg Bruno Junqueira 11 Flag of Brazil.svg Tony Kanaan 5 Flag of Mexico.svg Adrian Fernandez
317 Flag of Brazil.svg Vitor Meira 3 Flag of Brazil.svg Hélio Castroneves (W)55 Flag of Japan.svg Kosuke Matsuura (R)
44 Flag of South Africa.svg Tomas Scheckter 6 Flag of the United States.svg Sam Hornish, Jr. 16 Flag of the United States.svg Roger Yasukawa
51 Flag of New Zealand.svg Scott Dixon 2 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Mark Taylor (R)10 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Darren Manning (R)
652 Flag of the United States.svg Ed Carpenter (R)20 Flag of the United States.svg Al Unser, Jr. (W)70 Flag of the United States.svg Robby Gordon
739 Flag of the United States.svg Sarah Fisher 8 Flag of the United States.svg Scott Sharp 14 Flag of the United States.svg A.J. Foyt IV
841 Flag of the United States.svg Larry Foyt (R)51 Flag of the United States.svg Alex Barron 7 Flag of the United States.svg Bryan Herta
924 Flag of Brazil.svg Felipe Giaffone 12 Flag of Japan.svg Tora Takagi 13 Flag of the United States.svg Greg Ray
1091 Flag of the United States.svg Buddy Lazier (W)21 Flag of the United States.svg Jeff Simmons (R)33 Flag of the United States.svg Richie Hearn
1198 Flag of the United States.svg P.J. Jones (R)25 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Marty Roth (R)18 Flag of the United States.svg Robby McGehee

Failed to qualify

Race recap

First rain delay

Rain fell early in the morning between 6:00-6:20 a.m. Rain resumed at 9:18 a.m. and continued intermittently until about 10:30 a.m. Track drying efforts began and the start of the race was delayed by a little over two hours. Mari Hulman George gave the traditional command to start engines at 1:02 p.m.

Start

At 1:07 p.m., the field pulled away for the pace laps, about two hours and fifteen minutes behind schedule. At the start, Buddy Rice took the lead from the pole position. Rice led Dario Franchitti, Tony Kanaan, Dan Wheldon, and Hélio Castroneves.

On lap 10, A. J. Foyt IV brushed the wall in turn four and spun and crashed in turn 1. Foyt was uninjured. Several of the leaders pitted under the caution. Bryan Herta led the field back to green on lap 16. Three laps later, Wheldon took the lead but on lap 22, rain began to fall again and the caution was out again. The field circulated under yellow for several laps and, on lap 28, the red flag came out. Rain was falling hard and the cars were parked in the pits. Many believed the resumption would have to be delayed until Monday.

Re-start

After a delay of 1 hour and 47 minutes, the race was ready to resume. Robby Gordon, who was attempting to race in both the Indy 500 and Coca-Cola 600, departed the grounds and flew to Charlotte. Jaques Lazier was standing by, and climbed in the car to drive relief.

Shortly after 3:30 p.m., the race continued. Dan Wheldon led at the green but Buddy Rice quickly assumed the lead. An intense segment of racing saw several changes in position amongst the top 10 and the leaders racing closely together. On lap 56, Larry Foyt wrecked in turn two guaranteeing the Foyt team would finish 32nd-33rd.

First half

Buddy Rice continued to lead during the next stretch of green flag racing. Dan Wheldon and Sam Hornish, Jr. ran 2nd-3rd.

The third crash of the day involved Ed Carpenter and Mark Taylor on lap 64.

As the race approached the halfway point, Rice still led and Wheldon and Hornish continued to battle for 2nd and 3rd. The top five were still within seconds of each other.

On lap 94, P. J. Jones made contact with the wall exiting turn 2. Jaques Lazier dropped out with a broken axle and leader Buddy Rice stalled exiting the pits. Dan Wheldon took over the lead with Hélio Castroneves now second and Rice dropping down to 8th.

Second half

As the race completed the 101st lap, it was scored official and would not need to carry over into a second day. On lap 105, Darren Manning and Greg Ray got together, crashing in turn four and collecting Sam Hornish, Jr. The three cars slid into the end of the pit wall and came to rest at the entrance of the pits. Tony Kanaan now led with Rice still mired back in 8th.

Kanaan and Wheldon traded the lead a couple times until Marty Roth brought out the next caution by crashing in turn 4. Buddy Rice worked his way up to 5th for the restart. Meanwhile, Bruno Junqueira stayed out while the leaders pitted and took over the lead. Junquiera was gambling that his fuel would outlast the leaders in case rain were to resume.

Finish

At lap 150, Bruno Junqueira led Buddy Rice and Tony Kanaan. Approaching rain and one final round of pit stops for the leaders was looming and threatened to turn the result into a crap shoot. The first driver to go was Junqueira, who pitted for fuel and tires on lap 151.

The lead went back to Buddy Rice, who was followed closely by Tony Kanaan and Dan Wheldon. Kanaan ducked into the pits for fuel on lap 164 and Wheldon pitted on lap 165. Two laps later, Rice was in the pits, handing the lead over to Bryan Herta. Rain was fast approaching the Speedway and the race was not expected to reach the full distance before the rain fell. More of the leaders cycled into the pits.

Herta gave up the lead on lap 169 in order to pit for fuel. That handed the race lead to Adrian Fernandez as slight moisture was being reported around the track. Fernandez made it to lap 171 but significant rain was not falling yet and green flag conditions still prevailed. Fernandez made a quick 9-second pit stop but lost the lead. After the hectic sequence of pit stops, Buddy Rice was back into the lead.

With Rice leading, Kanaan second, and Wheldon back to third, rain started falling on lap 174. The yellow came out with Rice the certain winner. A severe thunderstorm approached the area and the race was halted after the completion of lap 180 (450 miles (720 km)), 20 laps short of the finish. Lightning forced the victory celebration indoors to the Pagoda.

Rice became the first American winner since Eddie Cheever in 1998. It was also the first rain-shortened 500 since 1976. An F2 tornado missed the Speedway and its quarter-million spectators by six miles as it raked across the south central portion of Indianapolis. The tornado caused widespread damage.

On race day, May 30, precipitation in Indianapolis totaled 3.80 inches; a record single-day amount for that date, and any date during the month since records had been kept. [5]

Results

FinishStartNoNameQualRankCELapsLedStatusEntrant
1115 Flag of the United States.svg Buddy Rice 222.0241PH18091Running Rahal Letterman Racing
2511 Flag of Brazil.svg Tony Kanaan 221.2005DH18028Running Andretti Green Racing
3226 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Dan Wheldon 221.5242DH18026Running Andretti Green Racing
4237 Flag of the United States.svg Bryan Herta 219.87113DH1803Running Andretti Green Racing
5436 Flag of Brazil.svg Bruno Junqueira 221.3794PH18016Running Newman/Haas Racing
6717 Flag of Brazil.svg Vitor Meira 220.9587PH1800Running Rahal Letterman Racing
765 Flag of Mexico.svg Adrian Fernández 220.9996PH1803Running Fernandez Racing
8131 Flag of New Zealand.svg Scott Dixon 219.31914PT1800Running Chip Ganassi Racing
983 Flag of Brazil.svg Hélio Castroneves (W)220.8828DT1800Running Team Penske
101216 Flag of the United States.svg Roger Yasukawa 220.03012PH1800Running Rahal Letterman Racing
11955 Flag of Japan.svg Kosuke Matsuura (R)220.7409PH1800Running Super Aguri Fernandez Racing
122451 Flag of the United States.svg Alex Barron 218.83617DC1803Running Team Cheever
13208 Flag of the United States.svg Scott Sharp 215.63524DT1800Running Kelley Racing
14327 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Dario Franchitti 221.4713DH1801Running Andretti Green Racing
152524 Flag of Brazil.svg Felipe Giaffone 216.25922DC1790Running Dreyer & Reinbold Racing
162921 Flag of the United States.svg Jeff Simmons (R)214.78326DT1790Running Mo Nunn Racing
171720 Flag of the United States.svg Al Unser, Jr. (W)217.96619DC1790Running Patrick Racing
18104 Flag of South Africa.svg Tomas Scheckter 220.41710DC1790Running Panther Racing
192612 Flag of Japan.svg Tora Takagi 214.36427DT1790Running Mo Nunn Racing
203033 Flag of the United States.svg Richie Hearn 213.71529PT1780Running Sam Schmidt Motorsports
211939 Flag of the United States.svg Sarah Fisher 215.77123DT1770Running Kelley Racing
223318 Flag of the United States.svg Robby McGehee 211.63133DC1770Running PDM Racing
232891 Flag of the United States.svg Buddy Lazier (W)215.11025DC1640Fuel System Hemelgarn Racing
243225 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Marty Roth (R)211.97432DT1280Accident FS Roth Racing
251510 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Darren Manning (R)219.27116PT1040Accident T4 Chip Ganassi Racing
26116 Flag of the United States.svg Sam Hornish, Jr. 220.18011DT1049Accident T4 Team Penske
272713 Flag of the United States.svg Greg Ray 216.64120PH980Accident T4 Access Motorsports
283198 Flag of the United States.svg P. J. Jones (R)213.35530DC920Accident BS CURB/Agajanian/Beck Motorsports
291870 Flag of the United States.svg Robby Gordon (relieved by Jaques Lazier)216.52221DC880Mechanical Robby Gordon Motorsports
30142 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Mark Taylor (R)219.28215DC620Accident T3 Panther Racing
311652 Flag of the United States.svg Ed Carpenter (R)218.59018DC620Accident T3 Team Cheever
322241 Flag of the United States.svg Larry Foyt (R)213.27731PT540Accident T2 A.J. Foyt Enterprises
332114 Flag of the United States.svg A. J. Foyt IV 214.25628DT260Handling A.J. Foyt Enterprises

(W) = Former Indianapolis 500 winner; (R) = Indianapolis 500 rookie

*C Chassis: D=Dallara, P=Panoz

*E Engine: C=Chevrolet, H=Honda, T=Toyota

All cars in the 2004 Indianapolis 500 used Firestone tires.

Notes: Race halted on lap 27 due to rain. The race was resumed and when rain pelted the Speedway again late in the race, officials waved the checkered flag 15 minutes after the traditional 6 PM closing time. It was only the second time in IMS history racing went past the traditional 6 PM EST closing time; in 1995, the Brickyard 400 raced into 7 PM EST (8 PM EDT) because of rain delays. Since the state's adoption of Daylight Saving Time, there have been years where Indianapolis 500 qualifying has passed 6 PM, and the Brickyard 400 has reached past that time on occasion. It is the only Indianapolis 500 to have reached 7 PM EDT. Two races, the 1995 Brickyard 400 (8:07 PM EDT) and the 2017 Brantley Gilbert Big Machine Brickyard 400 (8:57 PM EDT), have reached the 8 PM EDT hour.

During the rain delay, Robby Gordon flew to Charlotte for the Coca-Cola 600, which prompted the team to put Jaques Lazier in the car, but a mechanical failure forced the car not to finish.

Broadcasting

Radio

The race was carried live on the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Radio Network. Mike King served as chief announcer. Kenny Bräck served as "driver expert" up until the rain delay. Bräck sat out the 2004 IndyCar season due to a major crash suffered at Texas in October 2003. This was the only year that Bräck served as the driver expert on an American broadcast, however, he would serve in later years on international broadcasts.

Departing from the broadcast team were two longtime members, Howdy Bell and Chuck Marlowe. Donald Davidson celebrated his 40th year as a member of the crew, while Jerry Baker reached his milestone 30th race.

Kevin Lee moved from turn two to the pit area. Adam Alexander moved from the pits to the turn two location. This was Dave Argabright's first year on the network. This was the last year for both Jim Murphy and Kim Morris.

Indy Racing Radio Network
Booth AnnouncersTurn Reporters Pit/garage reporters

Chief Announcer: Mike King
Driver expert: Kenny Bräck
Historian: Donald Davidson
Color analyst: Dave Wilson
Commentary: Chris Economaki

Turn 1: Jerry Baker
Turn 2: Adam Alexander
Turn 3: Mark Jaynes
Turn 4: Chris Denari

Kevin Lee
Kim Morris
Jim Murphy
Dave Argabright

Television

The race was carried live flag-to-flag coverage in the United States on ABC Sports. The broadcast was billed as the Indianapolis 500 Presented by 7-Eleven . The broadcasting crew moved to a new booth, located in the Pit Road Suites next to the Pagoda. Several innovations were introduced, including the first 180-degree on-board rotating camera, and a Skycam along the mainstretch. The network celebrated its 40th anniversary covering the Indianapolis 500.

Bob Jenkins was released from ABC and ESPN after 2003, and his position as "host" was taken by Terry Gannon. Paul Page continued as play-by-play, along with Scott Goodyear. Jack Arute, who had been in the pit area from 1984-1998 and 2000-2003, moved into the booth as analyst for the 2004 race. Joining the crew for the first time were Todd Harris and Jamie Little, both as pit reporters.

Despite a lengthy rain delay throughout the afternoon, ABC stayed on-air all day with coverage, and filled the downtime with highlights and interviews. The marathon broadcast totaled 8 hours and 22 minutes.

The introduction, titled "The Chase," featuring Henry Rollins, would earn a Sports Emmy nomination for outstanding post produced audio/sound.

ABC Television
Booth Announcers Pit/garage reporters

Host: Terry Gannon
Announcer: Paul Page
Color: Scott Goodyear
Color: Jack Arute

Vince Welch
Dr. Jerry Punch
Gary Gerould
Todd Harris
Jamie Little

Notes

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The 84th Indianapolis 500 was held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana on Sunday, May 28, 2000. After four years of an ongoing organizational dispute and "split" in Indy car racing, Chip Ganassi Racing became the first CART-based team to compete at the race since 1995.. The Ganassi team of Jimmy Vasser and Juan Pablo Montoya competed as a one-off entry, and were well received by fans and fellow competitors. Both drivers were quickly up to speed with the IRL regulars, and were expected to be favorites in both qualifying and on race day. Also making a heralded return to Indianapolis was two-time winner Al Unser Jr. who had switched full-time to the IRL in 2000.

1997 Indianapolis 500 81st running of the Indianapolis 500 motor race

The 81st Indianapolis 500 was held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana over three days, May 25–27, 1997. It was originally scheduled for Sunday May 25, however, rain washed out all activities for the day. The race was started on Monday May 26, but rain halted the race after only 15 laps had been completed. On Tuesday May 27, the race was resumed, and was run to completion. The rain delay, as well as two controversies, put a damper on the month. Arie Luyendyk won the race from the pole position, his second Indy victory. Treadway Racing, in only their second season of competition, finished 1st-2nd with Luyendyk and teammate Scott Goodyear. The team became the first to sweep the top two finishing position at Indianapolis since Leader Cards in 1962.

2006 Indianapolis 500 90th running of the Indianapolis 500 motor race

The 90th Indianapolis 500 was held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana on Sunday May 28, 2006. Sam Hornish, Jr. won from the pole position. It was Hornish's first and only win at Indianapolis, and the record fourteenth Indy victory for Penske Racing. Hornish would later win the IndyCar Series championship, the second driver in a row to sweep the Indy 500 and season championship in the same season.

2007 Indianapolis 500 91st running of the Indianapolis 500 motor race

The 91st Indianapolis 500 was held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana on Sunday May 27, 2007. It was the twelfth Indy 500 sanctioned by the Indy Racing League, and marked the fifth race of the 2007 IndyCar Series season. Hélio Castroneves started the race on the pole position.

2007 IndyCar Series

The 2007 IRL IndyCar Series began with a night race on Saturday March 24 at Homestead-Miami Speedway. The season's premiere event, the 91st Indianapolis 500 was held May 27. The season finale was held at Chicagoland Speedway on September 9. Dario Franchitti, who won four races during the season, including the Indy 500, clinched the 2007 IndyCar Series Championship on the final lap of the final race, by winning the race after points leader Scott Dixon ran out of fuel while leading with less than ⅓ of a lap to go.

Firestone Indy 400

The Firestone Indy 400 was an IndyCar Series race held at Michigan International Speedway in Brooklyn, Michigan. The event was most recently held in 2007. From 1981 to 2001, the event was better-known as the Michigan 500, and was held in high prestige. During its heyday of the 1980s, the race was part of Indy car racing's 500-mile "Triple Crown".

2008 Indianapolis 500 92nd running of the Indianapolis 500 motor race

The 92nd Indianapolis 500 was held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana on Sunday May 25, 2008. Scott Dixon of New Zealand won the race from the pole position.

2009 Indianapolis 500 93rd running of the Indianapolis 500 motor race

The 93rd Indianapolis 500 was held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana on Sunday May 24, 2009. It was the 14th Indy 500 sanctioned by the Indy Racing League, and the premier event of the 2009 IndyCar Series season.

2010 Indianapolis 500 94th running of the Indianapolis 500 motor race

The 94th Indianapolis 500 was held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana on Sunday May 30, 2010. It was the 15th Indy 500 sanctioned by the Indy Racing League, and was the premier event of the 2010 IZOD IndyCar Series season. The race was won by Dario Franchitti, ahead of Dan Wheldon and Marco Andretti. Tony Kanaan, who had started in the final position, ran as high as second during the race before finishing eleventh.

2011 Indianapolis 500 95th running of the Indianapolis 500 motor race

The 95th Indianapolis 500 was held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana on Sunday May 29, 2011. The race was part of the 2011 IZOD IndyCar Series season. The track opened for practice on May 14 and time trials were held from May 21 to 22. Alex Tagliani won the pole position, and the race was won by Dan Wheldon. It was his second Indy 500 win after the 2005 race, and the last win of his racing career. It was the first of two Indy victories for car owner Bryan Herta.

2013 Indianapolis 500 97th running of the Indianapolis 500 motor race

The 97th Indianapolis 500 was held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana on Sunday May 26, 2013. It was the premier event of the 2013 IZOD IndyCar Series season. Tony Kanaan, a native of Brazil, was victorious on a record-setting day. Kanaan became the fourth Brazilian driver to win the Indianapolis 500 joined by Emerson Fittipaldi, Helio Castroneves, and Gil de Ferran.

2014 Indianapolis 500 98th running of the Indianapolis 500 motor race

The 98th Indianapolis 500 was held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana on Sunday May 25, 2014. It is the premier event of the 2014 Verizon IndyCar Series season. Tony Kanaan entered the race as the defending champion. Ed Carpenter won the pole position, his second consecutive pole at Indy. The race was won by Ryan Hunter-Reay, the first American-born winner since Sam Hornish, Jr. in 2006. Hunter-Reay held off second place Hélio Castroneves by a margin of 0.0600 seconds, the second-closest finish in race history. At an average speed of 186.563 mph (300.244 km/h), it was also the second-fastest 500 in history. Marco Andretti, Carlos Muñoz, and Juan Pablo Montoya rounded out the top five. Kurt Busch, in sixth position, claimed Rookie of the Year honors.

2015 Indianapolis 500 99th running of the Indianapolis 500 motor race

The 99th Indianapolis 500 was held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana on Sunday May 24, 2015. It was the premier event of the 2015 season of the Verizon IndyCar Series. Juan Pablo Montoya won his second Indianapolis 500, followed in the finish by Will Power, Charlie Kimball, polesitter Scott Dixon, and Graham Rahal.

2016 Indianapolis 500 100th running of the Indianapolis 500 motor race

The 2016 Indianapolis 500 took place on Sunday, May 29, 2016, at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana. It was the premier event of the 2016 Verizon IndyCar Series season. In a shocking finish, 24 year-old rookie Alexander Rossi of Andretti Herta Autosport won the race on fuel mileage over Carlos Muñoz and Josef Newgarden. Two-time winner Juan Pablo Montoya entered the race as the defending champion.

References

  1. "Single Point Fueling to Be Mandatory in 2005". Trackside Online. 2004-09-07. Archived from the original on 2014-02-22. Retrieved 2014-02-04.
  2. Fan Info - INDYCAR 101 - Glossary of Racing Terms
  3. Rookie Orientation Program Indy 500 summary
  4. Larry Foyt participates in rookie orientation
  5. NOAA - MAXIMUM Precipitation Records for Indianapolis (1871-2005)

Works cited

2003 Indianapolis 500
Gil de Ferran
2004 Indianapolis 500
Buddy Rice
2005 Indianapolis 500
Dan Wheldon