GM High Feature engine

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GM High Feature V6
Alloytec V6 (LPG) engine of a 2006-2008 Holden VE Commodore 1.jpg
Alloytec LPG V6 engine in a 2006-2008 Holden VE Commodore
Overview
Manufacturer General Motors
Also calledAlloytec V6
Production2004-present
Layout
Configuration 60° V6
Displacement
  • 2,792 cc (2.792 L)
  • 2,994 cc (2.994 L)
  • 3,195 cc (3.195 L)
  • 3,564 cc (3.564 L)
  • 3,649 cc (3.649 L)
Cylinder bore
  • 86 mm (3.39 in)
  • 89 mm (3.5 in)
  • 94 mm (3.7 in)
  • 95 mm (3.74 in)
Piston stroke
  • 74.8 mm (2.94 in)
  • 80.3 mm (3.16 in)
  • 85.6 mm (3.37 in)
  • 85.8 mm (3.38 in)
Block material Aluminum
Head materialAluminum
Valvetrain DOHC 4 valves x cyl. with VVT
Compression ratio 9.5:1, 10.0:1, 10.2:1, 10.3:1, 11.3:1, 11.5:1, 11.7:1, 12.2:1
RPM range
Redline 6500-7200
Combustion
Turbocharger Twin-turbo (in some models)
Fuel system Sequential multi-port fuel injection
Direct injection
Fuel type Gasoline, E85, LPG
Oil system Wet sump
Cooling system Water-cooled
Output
Power output 201–464 hp (150–346 kW; 204–470 PS)
Torque output 182–445 lb⋅ft (247–603 N⋅m)
Emissions
Emissions target standard Euro 6
Chronology
Predecessor

The GM High Feature engine (also known as the HFV6, and including the 3600 LY7 and derivative LP1) is a family of modern General Motors DOHC V6 engines. The series was introduced in 2004 with the Cadillac CTS and the Holden Commodore (VZ).

Contents

It is a 60° 24-valve design with aluminum block and heads and Sequential multi-port fuel injection. Most versions feature continuously variable cam phasing on both intake and exhaust valves and electronic throttle control. Other features include piston oil-jet capability, forged and fillet rolled crankshaft, sinter forged connecting rods, a variable-length intake manifold, twin knock control sensors and coil-on-plug ignition. It was developed by the same international team responsible for the Ecotec, including the Opel engineers responsible for the 54° V6, with involvement with design and development engineering from Ricardo plc.

Holden sells the HFV6 under the name Alloytec. The High Feature moniker on the Holden produced engine is reserved for the twin cam phasing high output version. The block was designed to be expandable from 2.8 L to 4.0 L. High Feature V6 engines were previously produced in Fishermans Bend, Port Melbourne, Australia and remain in production at the following four manufacturing locations: St. Catharines Engine Plant, St. Catharines, Canada; Flint Engine South in Flint, Michigan, United States; Romulus Engine Plant in Romulus, MI and Ramos Arizpe, Coahuila, Mexico. The assembly lines for the St. Catharines and Flint facilities were manufactured by Hirata Corporation at their powertrain facility in Kumamoto, Japan. Most of the designs of this motor happened in Flint. They were first produced for the Cadillac range. The engine block and cylinder heads are cast at Defiance Foundry in Defiance, Ohio.

History

The HFV6 was first designed, tested and produced in a joint program by Cadillac and Holden. A majority of designs into the new alloy construction, transmission pairing and first use in production were all undertaken in Detroit (and manufactured in St. Catharines, Ontario). Holden had the job of developing smaller engines (Holden 3.2, LP1 and Saab 2.8, LP9 Turbo) as well as their own Holden 3.6 HFV6 (called the Alloytec V6) for local models.

Cadillac and Holden both tested variations of these engines in US and Australia.

2.8

LP1

A 2.8 L (2,792 cc)LP1 variant was introduced in the 2005 Cadillac CTS. It was also used on the Chinese 2008 CTS. It has a 89 mm × 74.8 mm (3.50 in × 2.94 in) bore and stroke, Sequential multi-port fuel injection and a 10.0:1 compression ratio. The LP1 was built in St. Catharines, Ontario.

Applications:

Year(s)ModelPowerTorque
2007–2009 Buick Park Avenue (China)201 hp (150 kW; 204 PS) @ 6500 rpm195 lb⋅ft (264 N⋅m) @ 2600 rpm
2005–2007 Cadillac CTS 210 hp (157 kW; 213 PS) @ 6500 rpm194 lb⋅ft (263 N⋅m) @ 3300 rpm
2008-2010 Cadillac CTS 210 hp (157 kW; 213 PS) @ 6800 rpm182 lb⋅ft (247 N⋅m) @ 3600 rpm
2007–2009 Cadillac SLS (China)209 hp (156 kW; 212 PS) @ 6500 rpm194 lb⋅ft (263 N⋅m) @ 3300 rpm

LP9

2.8 L turbo V6 in a 2006 Saab 9-3 2006 Saab 9-3 SportCombi engine.jpg
2.8 L turbo V6 in a 2006 Saab 9-3

This engine is also known as a A28NET, Z28NET, Z28NEL or B284.

The LP9 is a 2.8 L turbocharged version used for the Saab 9-3, Saab 9-5 and other GM vehicles. It has the same bore and stroke as the naturally aspirated LP1, however the compression ratio is reduced to 9.5:1. The engine is manufactured at Holden's Fishermans Bend engine factory in Port Melbourne, Australia, while GM Powertrain Sweden (formerly Saab Automobile Powertrain) is responsible for turbocharging the engine. Global versions of this engine use the same horsepower rating for both metric and imperial markets – mechanical horsepower – while the Europe-only versions are rated in metric horsepower.

Applications:

Year(s)ModelPowerTorque
2005–2008 Opel/Vauxhall Vectra 227 hp (169 kW; 230 PS) @ 5500 rpm330 N⋅m (243 lb⋅ft) @ 1900-4500 rpm
2005–2008 Opel/Vauxhall Signum 227 hp (169 kW; 230 PS) @ 5500 rpm330 N⋅m (243 lb⋅ft) @ 1900-4500 rpm
2006–2008247 hp (184 kW; 250 PS) @ 5500 rpm350 N⋅m (258 lb⋅ft) @ 1900-4500 rpm
2005 Opel/Vauxhall Vectra OPC/VXR 247 hp (184 kW; 250 PS) @ 5500 rpm350 N⋅m (258 lb⋅ft) @ 1900-4500 rpm
2006–2008276 hp (206 kW; 280 PS) @ 5500 rpm350 N⋅m (258 lb⋅ft) @ 1900-4500 rpm
2006–2009 Cadillac BLS 247 hp (184 kW; 250 PS) @ 5500 rpm350 N⋅m (258 lb⋅ft) @ 1900-4500 rpm
2006–2008 Saab 9-3 Aero 247 hp (184 kW; 250 PS) @ 5500 rpm350 N⋅m (258 lb⋅ft) @ 1900-4500 rpm
2009276 hp (206 kW; 280 PS) @ 5500 rpm400 N⋅m (295 lb⋅ft) @ 1900-4500 rpm
2008 Saab 9-3 Turbo X 276 hp (206 kW; 280 PS) @ 5500 rpm400 N⋅m (295 lb⋅ft) @ 1900-4500 rpm
2008 Saab 9-3 Aero Convertible 252 hp (188 kW; 255 PS) @ 5500 rpm350 N⋅m (258 lb⋅ft) @ 1900-4500 rpm
2009276 hp (206 kW; 280 PS) @ 5500 rpm370 N⋅m (273 lb⋅ft) @ 1900-4500 rpm
2009–2013 Opel/Vauxhall Insignia 256 hp (191 kW; 260 PS) @ 5500 rpm350 N⋅m (258 lb⋅ft) @ 1900-4500 rpm
2009–2013 Opel/Vauxhall Insignia OPC/VXR 321 hp (239 kW; 325 PS) @ 5250 rpm435 N⋅m (321 lb⋅ft) @ 1900-4500 rpm
2010–2012 Saab 9-5 Turbo6 XWD /Aero 296 hp (221 kW; 300 PS) @ 5500 rpm400 N⋅m (295 lb⋅ft) @ 2000 rpm
2010–2012 Saab 9-5 Hirsch Performance 330 hp (246 kW; 335 PS) @ 5500 rpm430 N⋅m (317 lb⋅ft) @ 2500 rpm

LAU

The LAU is GM's new code for the LP9 Turbo engine, its usage starting with the 2010 Cadillac SRX. [1] In 2011, production of the Cadillac SRX with the LAU engine ceased, but the engine remained in use in the Saab 9-4X until 2012, when production of that model came to an end. [2] [3]

Applications:

Year(s)ModelPowerTorque
2010-2011 Cadillac SRX 300 hp (224 kW; 304 PS) at 5500 rpm295 lb⋅ft (400 N⋅m) at 2000 rpm
2011-2012 Saab 9-4X 300 hp (224 kW; 304 PS) at 5500 rpm295 lb⋅ft (400 N⋅m) at 2000 rpm

3.0

LF1

The LF1 is a 3.0-litre (2,994 cc) version with a bore and stroke of 89 mm × 80.3 mm (3.50 in × 3.16 in) produced between 2010 and 2014 equipped with spark ignition direct injection (SIDI) and a 11.7:1 compression ratio.

Applications:

Year(s)ModelPowerTorque
2010 Buick LaCrosse 255 hp (190 kW; 259 PS) @ 6950 rpm217 lb⋅ft (294 N⋅m) @ 5600 rpm
2010–2012 Buick Park Avenue (China)251 hp (187 kW; 254 PS) @ 6700 rpm218 lb⋅ft (296 N⋅m) @ 2900 rpm
2010–2011 Cadillac CTS 270 hp (201 kW; 274 PS) @ 7000 rpm223 lb⋅ft (302 N⋅m) @ 5700 rpm
2011–2013 Cadillac SLS (China)268 hp (200 kW; 272 PS) @ 7000 rpm300 N⋅m (221 ft⋅lb) @ 5600 rpm
2010–2011 Cadillac SRX [4] 265 hp (198 kW; 269 PS) @ 6950 rpm223 lb⋅ft (302 N⋅m) @ 5100 rpm
2010 Chevrolet Equinox 264 hp (197 kW; 268 PS) @ 6950 rpm222 lb⋅ft (301 N⋅m) @ 5100 rpm
2010 GMC Terrain 264 hp (197 kW; 268 PS) @ 6950 rpm222 lb⋅ft (301 N⋅m) @ 5100 rpm
2010 Holden Commodore 255 hp (190 kW; 259 PS) @ 6700 rpm214 lb⋅ft (290 N⋅m) @ 2900 rpm
2011 Saab 9-4X [3] 265 hp (198 kW; 269 PS) @ 6950 rpm223 lb⋅ft (302 N⋅m) @ 5100 rpm
2011 Chevrolet Captiva 255 hp (190 kW; 259 PS) @ 6900 rpm212 lb⋅ft (287 N⋅m) @ 5800 rpm
2012 Chevrolet Malibu (Middle East) [5] 260 hp (194 kW; 264 PS) @ 6900 rpm214 lb⋅ft (290 N⋅m) @ 5600 rpm

LFW

The LFW is a flexible fuel version of the LF1, capable of running on E85, gasoline, or any mixture of the two. Output is identical to the LF1.

Applications:

Year(s)ModelPowerTorque
2011-2017 Buick GL8 (China only)254 hp (189 kW; 258 PS) @ 6800 rpm214 lb⋅ft (290 N⋅m) @ 5200 rpm
2011–2012 Chevrolet Equinox 264 hp (197 kW; 268 PS) @ 6950 rpm222 lb⋅ft (301 N⋅m) @ 5100 rpm
2011–2012 GMC Terrain 264 hp (197 kW; 268 PS) @ 6950 rpm222 lb⋅ft (301 N⋅m) @ 5100 rpm
2012–2013 Cadillac CTS 270 hp (201 kW; 274 PS) @ 7000 rpm223 lb⋅ft (302 N⋅m) @ 5700 rpm
2012–2013 Chevrolet Captiva Sport 264 hp (197 kW; 268 PS) @ 6950 rpm222 lb⋅ft (301 N⋅m) @ 5100 rpm
2010-2017 Holden Commodore 254 hp (189 kW; 258 PS) @ 6800 rpm214 lb⋅ft (290 N⋅m) @ 5200 rpm

3.2

Holden has built its own 3.2 L (3,195 cc) version of the High Feature engine in Australia produced between 2005 and 2010 with a bore and stroke of 89 mm × 85.6 mm (3.50 in × 3.37 in). Branded with the Alloytec name like the 3.6 litre version, this version produces 227 hp (169 kW; 230 PS) at 6600 rpm and 297 N⋅m (219 lb⋅ft) at 3200 rpm. It has a 10.3:1 compression ratio. Its fuel economy is 4–6 km/L (11–17 mpgimp; 9.4–14.1 mpgUS) in city, and 7–9 km/L (20–25 mpgimp; 16–21 mpgUS) on highway.[ citation needed ]. Holden also produced the 3.2 L engines that were used by Alfa Romeo as the basis of its JTS V6 engine.

Applications:

3.6

3.6
Alloytec V6 engine of a 2006 Holden VZ Commodore SVZ 01.jpg
3.6 L engine in a Holden VZ Commodore
Overview
Production2004-present
Layout
Displacement 3,564 cc (3.564 L)
Cylinder bore 94 mm (3.70 in)
Piston stroke 85.6 mm (3.37 in)
Compression ratio 10.2:1, 11.3:1, 11.5:1
Combustion
Fuel system
Fuel type Gasoline, Autogas (LPG), E85
Dimensions
Dry weight168 kg (370 lb) (3.6 V6 High Feature engine) [6]

LY7

The 3.6 L; 217.5 cu in (3,564 cc)LY7 engine was introduced in the 2004 Cadillac CTS sedan. It has a 10.2:1 compression ratio, a bore and a stroke of 94 mm × 85.6 mm (3.70 in × 3.37 in). Lower powered versions only have variable cam phasing on the inlet cam (LE0). Selected models also include variable exhaust. The engine weighs 370 lb (170 kg) as installed.

This engine is produced in several locations: St. Catharines (Ontario), Flint Engine South (Michigan), Melbourne (Australia), Ramos Arizpe (Mexico), and Sagara (Japan) by Suzuki.

Suzuki's engine designation is N36A.

A dual fuel 235 hp (175 kW; 238 PS) version able to run on petrol and autogas (LPG) has also been produced by Holden in Australia.

Applications: [7]

Year(s)ModelPowerTorque
2004–2007 Buick Rendezvous CXL/Ultra242 hp (180 kW; 245 PS) @ 6000 rpm232 lb⋅ft (315 N⋅m) @ 3500 rpm
2004–2007 Cadillac CTS 255 hp (190 kW; 259 PS) @ 6200 rpm252 lb⋅ft (342 N⋅m) @ 2800 rpm
2008–2009 Cadillac CTS 263 hp (196 kW; 267 PS) @ 6200 rpm253 lb⋅ft (343 N⋅m) @ 3100 rpm
2004–2009 Cadillac SRX 255 hp (190 kW; 259 PS) @ 6500 rpm254 lb⋅ft (344 N⋅m) @ 2800 rpm
2004–2005 Holden VZ Commodore 235 hp (175 kW; 238 PS) @ 6000 rpm236 lb⋅ft (320 N⋅m) @ 2800 rpm
2006–2007231 hp (172 kW; 234 PS) @ 6000 rpm236 lb⋅ft (320 N⋅m) @ 2800 rpm
2004–2006 Holden VZ Commodore Holden WL Statesman Holden VZ Calais SV6255 hp (190 kW; 259 PS) @ 6500 rpm251 lb⋅ft (340 N⋅m) @ 3200 rpm
2006–2007255 hp (190 kW; 259 PS) @ 6500 rpm247 lb⋅ft (335 N⋅m) @ 3200 rpm
2005–2008 Buick LaCrosse CXS240 hp (179 kW; 243 PS) @ 6000 rpm225 lb⋅ft (305 N⋅m) @ 2000 rpm
2005–2007 Cadillac STS 255 hp (190 kW; 259 PS) @ 6500 rpm252 lb⋅ft (342 N⋅m) @ 3200 rpm
2006–2007 Holden VE Commodore Omega240 hp (179 kW; 243 PS) @ 6000 rpm243 lb⋅ft (329 N⋅m) @ 2600 rpm
2008–2009235 hp (175 kW; 238 PS) @ 6500 rpm240 lb⋅ft (325 N⋅m) @ 2400 rpm
2006–2009 Holden WM Statesman/Caprice 262 hp (195 kW; 266 PS) @ 6500 rpm250 lb⋅ft (339 N⋅m) @ 2600 rpm
2007–2009 Buick Park Avenue (China)255 hp (190 kW; 259 PS) @ 6600 rpm250 lb⋅ft (339 N⋅m) @ 2800 rpm
2007–2009 Cadillac SLS (China)251 hp (187 kW; 254 PS) @ 6500 rpm252 lb⋅ft (342 N⋅m) @ 3200 rpm
2006–2011 Holden Rodeo/Colorado 211 hp (157 kW; 214 PS) @ 6500 rpm231 lb⋅ft (313 N⋅m) @ 2600 rpm
2007–2008 GMC Acadia 275 hp (205 kW; 279 PS) @ 6600 rpm251 lb⋅ft (340 N⋅m) @ 3200 rpm
2007 Pontiac G6 GTP252 hp (188 kW; 255 PS) @ 6300 rpm251 lb⋅ft (340 N⋅m) @ 3200 rpm
2007–2009 Saturn Aura XR252 hp (188 kW; 255 PS) @ 6300 rpm251 lb⋅ft (340 N⋅m) @ 3200 rpm
2007–2008 Saturn Outlook XE single exhaust270 hp (201 kW; 274 PS) @ 6600 rpm248 lb⋅ft (336 N⋅m) @ 3200 rpm
2007–2008 Saturn Outlook XR dual exhaust275 hp (205 kW; 279 PS) @ 6600 rpm251 lb⋅ft (340 N⋅m) @ 3200 rpm
2008 Buick Enclave 275 hp (205 kW; 279 PS) @ 6600 rpm251 lb⋅ft (340 N⋅m) @ 3200 rpm
2008–2012 Chevrolet Malibu 252 hp (188 kW; 255 PS) @ 6300 rpm251 lb⋅ft (340 N⋅m) @ 3200 rpm
2008–2009 Chevrolet Equinox Sport264 hp (197 kW; 268 PS) @ 6500 rpm250 lb⋅ft (339 N⋅m) @ 2300 rpm
2008–2009 Pontiac G6 GXP252 hp (188 kW; 255 PS) @ 6300 rpm251 lb⋅ft (340 N⋅m) @ 3200 rpm
2008–2009 Pontiac G8 256 hp (191 kW; 260 PS) @ 6300 rpm248 lb⋅ft (336 N⋅m) @ 2100 rpm
2008–2009 Pontiac Torrent GXP264 hp (197 kW; 268 PS) @ 6500 rpm250 lb⋅ft (339 N⋅m) @ 2300 rpm
2008–2009 Saturn Vue XR / Red Line257 hp (192 kW; 261 PS) @ 6500 rpm248 lb⋅ft (336 N⋅m) @ 2100 rpm
2007-2009 Suzuki XL7 252 hp (188 kW; 255 PS) at 6500 rpm243 lb⋅ft (329 N⋅m) at 2300 rpm

LLT

The 3.6 L (3,564 cc)LLT is a direct injected version based on the earlier LY7 engine. It was first unveiled in May 2006, and the DI version was claimed to have 15 percent greater power, 8 percent greater torque, and 3 percent better fuel economy than its port-injected counterpart. The LLT engine has a compression ratio of 11.3:1, and has been certified by the SAE to produce 302 hp (225 kW; 306 PS) at 6300 rpm and 272 lb⋅ft (369 N⋅m) of torque at 5200 rpm on regular unleaded (87 octane) gasoline. This engine debuted on the 2008 Cadillac STS and CTS. [8] [9] GM used a LLT in all 2009 Lambda-derived crossover SUVs to allow class-leading fuel economy in light of the new Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards. In the Lambdas, LLT engine produces 288 hp (215 kW; 292 PS) and 270 lb⋅ft (366 N⋅m) of torque. [10] [11] [12]

Applications:

Year(s)ModelPowerTorqueDyno chart
2008–2011 Cadillac CTS 304 hp (227 kW; 308 PS) @ 6400 rpm273 lb⋅ft (370 N⋅m) @ 5200 rpm
2008–2011 Cadillac STS 302 hp (225 kW; 306 PS) @ 6300 rpm272 lb⋅ft (369 N⋅m) @ 5200 rpm
2009–2017 Buick Enclave 288 hp (215 kW; 292 PS) @ 6300 rpm270 lb⋅ft (366 N⋅m) @ 3400 rpm 2016 link
2009–2017 Chevrolet Traverse single exhaust281 hp (210 kW; 285 PS) @ 6300 rpm266 lb⋅ft (361 N⋅m) @ 3400 rpm 2016 link (red)
2009–2017 Chevrolet Traverse dual exhaust288 hp (215 kW; 292 PS) @ 6300 rpm270 lb⋅ft (366 N⋅m) @ 3400 rpm 2016 link (blue)
2009–2016 GMC Acadia 288 hp (215 kW; 292 PS)270 lb⋅ft (366 N⋅m) 2016 link
2009 Saturn Outlook single exhaust281 hp (210 kW; 285 PS) @ 6300 rpm266 lb⋅ft (361 N⋅m) @ 3400 rpm
2009 Saturn Outlook dual exhaust288 hp (215 kW; 292 PS) @ 6300 rpm270 lb⋅ft (366 N⋅m) @ 3400 rpm
2009–2011 Daewoo Veritas
2009–2011 Holden VE Commodore SV6281 hp (210 kW; 285 PS) @ 6400 rpm258 lb⋅ft (350 N⋅m) @ 2900 rpm
2009–2011 Holden WM Statesman/Caprice 281 hp (210 kW; 285 PS) @ 6400 rpm258 lb⋅ft (350 N⋅m) @ 2900 rpm
2010–2011 Buick LaCrosse CXS 280 hp (209 kW; 284 PS) @ 6400 rpm259 lb⋅ft (351 N⋅m) @ 5200 rpm
2010-2011 Chevrolet Camaro 312 hp (233 kW; 316 PS) @ 6400 rpm278 lb⋅ft (377 N⋅m) @ 5200 rpm
2010–2011 Cadillac SLS (China)307 hp (229 kW; 311 PS) @ 6400 rpm276 lb⋅ft (374 N⋅m) @ 5200 rpm

LFX

The LFX is an enhanced version of the LLT engine. Introduced in the MY2012 Chevrolet Camaro LS, it is 20.5 pounds (9.3 kg) lighter than the LLT, due to a redesigned cylinder head and integrated exhaust manifold, and composite intake manifold. Other components like the fuel injectors, intake valves, and fuel pump have also been updated. Power and torque are up slightly from the LLT. The compression ratio is 11.5:1. The LFX also features E85 flex-fuel capability.

Applications:

Year(s)ModelPowerTorqueDyno chart
2012–2016 Buick LaCrosse 303 hp (226 kW; 307 PS) @ 6800 rpm264 lb⋅ft (358 N⋅m) @ 5300 rpm link
2013–2015 Cadillac ATS 321 hp (239 kW; 325 PS) @ 6800 rpm274 lb⋅ft (371 N⋅m) @ 4800 rpm link
2012–2014 Cadillac CTS
(2014 Wagon & Coupe only)
318 hp (237 kW; 322 PS) @ 6800 rpm275 lb⋅ft (373 N⋅m) @ 4900 rpm link
2014–2015 Cadillac CTS
(2014 Sedan only)
321 hp (239 kW; 325 PS) @ 6800 rpm275 lb⋅ft (373 N⋅m) @ 4900 rpm link
2012–2016 Cadillac SRX 308 hp (230 kW; 312 PS) @ 6800 rpm265 lb⋅ft (359 N⋅m) @ 2400 rpm link
2013–2019 Cadillac XTS 304 hp (227 kW; 308 PS) @ 6800 rpm264 lb⋅ft (358 N⋅m) @ 5200 rpm link
2012–2015 Chevrolet Camaro 323 hp (241 kW; 327 PS) @ 6800 rpm278 lb⋅ft (377 N⋅m) @ 4800 rpm link
2012–2017 Chevrolet Caprice PPV301 hp (224 kW; 305 PS) @ 6700 rpm265 lb⋅ft (359 N⋅m) @ 4800 rpm link
2015–2016 Chevrolet Colorado 305 hp (227 kW; 309 PS) @ 6800 rpm269 lb⋅ft (365 N⋅m) @ 4000 rpm link
GMC Canyon link
2013–2017 Chevrolet Equinox 301 hp (224 kW; 305 PS) @ 6500 rpm272 lb⋅ft (369 N⋅m) @ 4800 rpm link
2012–2016 Chevrolet Impala 302 hp (225 kW; 306 PS) @ 6500 rpm262 lb⋅ft (355 N⋅m) @ 5300 rpm
2014–2020 Chevrolet Impala 305 hp (227 kW; 309 PS) @ 6500 rpm262 lb⋅ft (355 N⋅m) @ 5300 rpm link
2013–2017 GMC Terrain 301 hp (224 kW; 305 PS) @ 6500 rpm272 lb⋅ft (369 N⋅m) @ 4800 rpm link
2011–2015 Holden Caprice 281 hp (210 kW; 285 PS) @ 6700 rpm258 lb⋅ft (350 N⋅m) @ 2800 rpm
2011–2013 Holden Commodore VE II (MY 2012)281 hp (210 kW; 285 PS) @ 6700 rpm258 lb⋅ft (350 N⋅m) @ 2800 rpm
2013–2017 Holden Commodore VF281 hp (210 kW; 285 PS) @ 6700 rpm258 lb⋅ft (350 N⋅m) @ 2800 rpm

LWR

The LWR is dedicated LPG 3.6-liter engine. Introduced in the MY2012 Holden Commodore, Based on the 3.6-litre LY7 engine, the LWR had a vapour injection system. The vapour injection system injected gas directly into the air intake runner, thereby preventing excess gas from circulating through the air intake system. Although liquid LPG injection generally produces more power, Holden justified vapour injection on the grounds of lower fuel consumption, lower CO
2
emissions, reduced pumping and parasitic losses, and start-up reliability in hot weather.

The dedicated LPG LWR engine produced peak power and torque of 180 kW (245 PS; 241 hp) at 6000 rpm and 320 N⋅m (236 lb⋅ft) at 2000 rpm. The LWR engine was engine was mated to GM's six-speed 6L45 automatic transmission and, over the combined ADR 81/02 test cycle, the Commodore Omega achieved fuel consumption of 11.8 L/100 km (24 mpgimp; 19.9 mpgUS) – an improvement of 1.6 L/100 km (180 mpgimp; 150 mpgUS) compared to its dual fuel LW2 predecessor. Furthermore, the LWR engine exceeded Euro 6 emissions standards.

Applications:

Year(s)ModelPowerTorqueDyno chart
2012–2013 Holden Commodore VE II (MY 2012)241 hp (180 kW; 244 PS) @ 6000 rpm236 lb⋅ft (320 N⋅m) @ 2000 rpm
2013–2015 Holden Commodore VF241 hp (180 kW; 244 PS) @ 6000 rpm236 lb⋅ft (320 N⋅m) @ 2000 rpm
2012–2015 Holden Caprice 241 hp (180 kW; 244 PS) @ 6000 rpm236 lb⋅ft (320 N⋅m) @ 2000 rpm

LCS

The 3.6 L (3,564 cc)LCS is derived from the direct-injected LLT for use in hybrids, using the two-mode system. [13] Differences from the LLT include a slightly lower compression ratio, 11.3:1, and lower power and torque peaks. It was to debut in the 2009 Saturn Vue Hybrid, where it would make 262 hp (195 kW; 266 PS) at 6100 rpm and 250 lb⋅ft (339 N⋅m) of torque at 4800 rpm. [14] Fuel economy 6–8 km/L (17–23 mpgimp; 14–19 mpgUS) in city, 9–11 km/L (25–31 mpgimp; 21–26 mpgUS) on highway Applications:

LF3

The 3.6 L twin-turbocharged version for the 2014 Cadillac CTS and 2014 Cadillac XTS was announced at the 2013 NYAS. [15]

The engine is rated at 420 hp (313 kW; 426 PS) of power at 5750 rpm and 430 lb⋅ft (583 N⋅m) of torque at 3500-4500 rpm (with 90% of torque being available at 2500-5500 rpm) and helps the CTS achieve 0–60 mph (0–97 km/h) time of 4.6 seconds with an 8-speed automatic transmission.

In essence, the twin-turbo 3.6L V6 is the forced-induction variant of the popular LFX V6 found in the Cadillac ATS, XTS, and SRX, among many other GM models, with several important upgrades, including:

Applications:

Year(s)ModelPowerTorqueDyno chart
2014–2019 Cadillac XTS 404 hp (301 kW; 410 PS) @ 6000 rpm369 lb⋅ft (500 N⋅m) @ 1900-5600 rpm link
2014–2019 Cadillac CTS 420 hp (313 kW; 426 PS) @ 5750 rpm430 lb⋅ft (583 N⋅m) @ 3500-4500 rpm link

LF4

The LF4 is a higher-performance variant of the LF3 for use in the Cadillac ATS-V. Changes to the LF3 include:

Applications:

Year(s)ModelPowerTorqueDyno chart
2016–2019 Cadillac ATS-V, Cadillac ATS-V Coupe 464 hp (346 kW; 470 PS) @ 5850 RPM445 lb⋅ft (603 N⋅m) @ 3500 RPM 2016 link
2022-present Cadillac CT4-V Blackwing 472 hp (352 kW; 479 PS)445 lb⋅ft (603 N⋅m)

LFR

The LFR is a bi-fuel variant of the LFX, although multi-point fuel injection is used for both the gasoline and CNG instead of direct-injection.

Applications:

Year(s)ModelPowerTorqueDyno chart
2015–2017 Chevrolet Impala Bi-Fuel CNG232 hp (173 kW; 235 PS) @ 6000 RPMCNG218 lb⋅ft (296 N⋅m) @ 5200 RPM 2016 CNG link
Gasoline258 hp (192 kW; 262 PS) @ 5900 RPMGasoline244 lb⋅ft (331 N⋅m) @ 4800 RPM 2016 Gas link

LFY

The LFY is similar to the LFX, but adds stop-start technology and has improved airflow. [18]

Applications:

Year(s)ModelPowerTorqueDyno chart
2018– Buick Enclave 310 hp (231 kW; 314 PS) @ 6800 rpm266 lb⋅ft (361 N⋅m) @ 2800 rpm
2018– Chevrolet Traverse 310 hp (231 kW; 314 PS) @ 6800 rpm266 lb⋅ft (361 N⋅m) @ 2800 rpm

Fourth generation

Starting with 2016 Cadillac models a new generation of High Feature V6s were developed. [19] These new engines have redesigned block architectures with bore centers increased from 103 mm (4.055 in) on prior HFV6 engines to 106 mm (4.173 in) and a redesigned cooling system to target the hottest areas while also facilitating faster warm-up. They also incorporate engine start-stop technology, cylinder-deactivation, 2-stage oil pumps, and updated variable valve timing featuring intermediate park technology for late-intake valve closure. Both engines debuted in the 2016 Cadillac CT6. [20]

3.0 L

LGW

Bore and stroke of 86 mm × 85.8 mm (3.39 in × 3.38 in) are used, along with a 9.8:1 compression ratio and twin turbos with titanium-aluminide turbine wheels. Maximum engine speed is 6500 RPM. Premium unleaded fuel is required.

Applications:

Year(s)ModelPowerTorqueDyno chart
2016–2019 Cadillac CT6 404 hp (301 kW; 410 PS) @ 5700 RPM400 lb⋅ft (542 N⋅m) @ 2500-5100 RPM dyno chart

LGY

Bore and stroke of 86 mm × 85.8 mm (3.39 in × 3.38 in) are used, along with a 9.8:1 compression ratio and twin turbos with titanium-aluminide turbine wheels. Maximum engine speed is 6500 RPM. Premium unleaded fuel is required.

Applications:

Year(s)ModelPowerTorqueDyno chart
2020-present Cadillac CT5 335 hp (250 kW; 340 PS) @ 5600 RPM400 lb⋅ft (542 N⋅m) @ 2400-4400 RPM
V: 360 hp (268 kW; 365 PS) @ 5600 RPMV: 405 lb⋅ft (549 N⋅m) @ 2400-4400 RPM

3.6 L

LGX

Along with the increased bore spacing, the new 3.6 L DI V6 has larger bores than before, growing from 94 mm (3.701 in) to 95 mm (3.740 in) with the same 85.8 mm (3.378 in) stroke as the 3.0L LGW, for a displacement of 3.6 L (3,649 cc). Intake and exhaust valves are also increased in size along with other changes to the cylinder head. [21] Compression ratio is 11.5:1 and maximum engine speed is 7200 RPM.

Applications:

Year(s)ModelPowerTorqueDyno chart
2016–2019 Cadillac ATS 335 hp (250 kW; 340 PS) @ 6800 RPM285 lb⋅ft (386 N⋅m) @ 5300 RPM 2016 link
2016–2019 Cadillac CT6 335 hp (250 kW; 340 PS) @ 6800 RPM284 lb⋅ft (385 N⋅m) @ 5300 RPM 2016 link
2016–2019 Cadillac CTS 335 hp (250 kW; 340 PS) @ 6800 RPM285 lb⋅ft (386 N⋅m) @ 5300 RPM 2016 link
2016–present Chevrolet Camaro 335 hp (250 kW; 340 PS) @ 6800 RPM284 lb⋅ft (385 N⋅m) @ 5300 RPM 2016 link
2017–present Buick LaCrosse 310 hp (231 kW; 314 PS) @ 6800 RPM282 lb⋅ft (382 N⋅m) @ 5200 RPM
2018–present Buick Regal GS 310 hp (231 kW; 314 PS) @ 6800 RPM282 lb⋅ft (382 N⋅m) @ 5200 RPM
2018–2020 Holden Commodore 315 hp (235 kW; 319 PS) @ 6800 RPM281 lb⋅ft (381 N⋅m) @ 5200 RPM
2017–present Cadillac XT5 310 hp (231 kW; 314 PS) @ 6600 RPM271 lb⋅ft (367 N⋅m) @ 5000 RPM
2017–present GMC Acadia 310 hp (231 kW; 314 PS) @ 6600 RPM271 lb⋅ft (367 N⋅m) @ 5000 RPM
2019–present Chevrolet Blazer 308 hp (230 kW; 312 PS) @ 6600 RPM269 lb⋅ft (365 N⋅m) @ 5000 RPM
2020–present Cadillac XT6 310 hp (231 kW; 314 PS) @ 6600 RPM271 lb⋅ft (367 N⋅m) @ 5000 RPM

LGZ

The LGZ is a variant of the LGX designed for pickup truck use. [22] [23]

Applications:

Year(s)ModelPowerTorqueDyno chart
2017–present GMC Canyon 308 hp (230 kW; 312 PS) @ 6800 RPM275 lb⋅ft (373 N⋅m) @ 4000 RPM
Chevrolet Colorado

V12

On March 21, 2007 AutoWeek reported that GM was planning to develop a 60-degree V12 based on this engine family to power the top version of Cadillac's upcoming flagship sedan. This Cadillac would essentially have had two 3.6 L High Feature V6s attached crankshaft-to-crankshaft and would have featured high-end technologies including direct injection and cylinder deactivation. If this engine would have been developed, it would have displaced 7.2 liters, and produced approximately 600 hp (447 kW; 608 PS) and 540 lb⋅ft (732 N⋅m) of torque. Development of the engine was reportedly being conducted in Australia by Holden. [24]

In August, 2008, GM announced that development of the V12 had been cancelled. [25]

Timing chain issues

Mainly earlier production 2.8, 3.0, 3.2, and 3.6 liter engines with the three chain design suffered from premature timing chain failures due to a faulty PCV system and extended oil change intervals. Most of the problems occurred on pre LFX engines. [26]

See also

Related Research Articles

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Buick V6 engine Motor vehicle engine

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