Hobson's Choice (1931 film)

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Hobson's Choice
Directed by Thomas Bentley
Written by Frank Launder
Based onthe play Hobson's Choice by Harold Brighouse
Starring
Cinematography Walter J. Harvey
Production
company
Distributed by Wardour Films
Release date
  • 1931 (1931)
CountryUnited Kingdom
Language English

Hobson's Choice is a 1931 British comedy drama film directed by Thomas Bentley and starring James Harcourt, Viola Lyel, Frank Pettingell and Herbert Lomas. [1] Based on the 1916 play Hobson's Choice by Harold Brighouse, it follows the tale of a coarse bootshop owner who becomes outraged when his eldest daughter decides to marry a meek cobbler. It was produced by the leading British company of the time, British International Pictures, at their studios in Elstree.

Contents

The film is missing from the BFI National Archive, and is listed as one of the British Film Institute's "75 Most Wanted" lost films. [2] An earlier silent film version of the play had been released in 1920.

Cast

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References

  1. "Hobson's Choice". British Film Institute. Archived from the original on 14 January 2009.
  2. "Hobson's Choice / BFI Most Wanted". British Film Institute. Archived from the original on 3 August 2012. Retrieved 30 May 2014.