India women's national cricket team

Last updated

India national cricket team
Nickname(s)Women in Blue
Association Board of Control for Cricket in India
Personnel
Captain
Coach Flag of India.svg Ramesh Powar
International Cricket Council
ICC statusFull member (1926)
ICC region Asia
ICC RankingsCurrent [1] Best-ever
WODI 4th 2nd (1 May 2020)
WT20I 3rd 3rd (15 Nov 2019)
Women's Tests
First WTestv WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies at the M. Chinnaswamy Stadium, Bangalore; 31 October – 2 November 1976
Last WTestv Flag of England.svg  England at Bristol County Ground, Bristol; 16–19 June 2021
WTestsPlayedWon/Lost
Total [2] 37 5/6
(26 draws)
This year [3] 1 0/0 (1 draw)
Women's One Day Internationals
First WODIv Flag of England.svg  England at Eden Gardens, Calcutta; 1 January 1978
Last WODIv Flag of England.svg  England at New Road, Worcester; 3 July 2021
WODIsPlayedWon/Lost
Total [4] 280 153/122
(1 ties, 4 no result)
This year [5] 8 2/6
(0 ties, 0 no result)
Women's World Cup appearances9 (first in 1978 )
Best resultRunner-Up (2005, 2017)
Women's World Cup Qualifier appearances1 (first in 2017 )
Best resultWinner (2017)
Women's Twenty20 Internationals
First WT20Iv Flag of England.svg  England at the County Cricket Ground, Derby; 5 August 2006
Last WT20Iv Flag of England.svg  England at County Cricket Ground, Chelmsford; 14 July 2021
WT20IsPlayedWon/Lost
Total [6] 129 69/58
(0 ties, 2 no result)
This year [7] 6 2/4
(0 ties, 0 no result)
Women's T20 World Cup appearances6 (first in 2009 )
Best resultRunner-Up (2020)
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body collar.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm.svg
Kit trousers long.png

Test kit

Kit left arm.svg
Kit body lightblueshoulders.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm.svg
Kit trousers long.png

ODI and T20I kit

As of 14 July 2021

The India women's national cricket team, nicknamed the Women in Blue, [8] represents the country of India in international women's cricket.

Contents

India made its Test debut in 1976, [9] against the West Indies, and its One Day International (ODI) debut at the 1978 World Cup, which it hosted. The team has made the World Cup final on three occasions, losing to Australia by 98 runs in 2005 and losing to England by 9 runs in 2017. India has made the semi-finals on three other occasions, in 1997, 2000, and 2009. India has also made the finals of the World Twenty20 on one occasion (2020) and the semi-finals on three occasions (2009, 2010, and 2018).

History

Members of the Indian cricket team before a Women's Cricket World Cup game in Sydney Snehal Pradhan (10 March 2009, Sydney) 2.jpg
Members of the Indian cricket team before a Women's Cricket World Cup game in Sydney

The British brought cricket to India in the early 1700s, with the first documented instance of cricket being played is in 1721. [10] The first Indian cricket club was established by the Parsi community in Bombay, in 1848; the club played their first match against the Europeans in 1877. [11] The first official Indian cricket team was formed in 1911 and toured England, where they played English county teams. [12] The India team made their Test debut against England in 1932. [13] Around the same time (1934), the first women's Test was played between England and Australia. [14] However, women's cricket arrived in India much later; the Women's Cricket Association of India was formed in 1973. [15] The Indian women's team played their first Test match in 1976, against the West Indies. [16] India recorded its first-ever Test win in November 1978 against West Indies under Shantha Rangaswamy's captaincy at the Moin-ul-Haq Stadium in Patna. [17] [18]

Indian Batswoman at Cricket World Cup 2010 Indian Batswoman at Cricket Worlds Cup 2010.jpg
Indian Batswoman at Cricket World Cup 2010
Mithali Raj, Captain of India Women's cricket team Mithali Raj Truro 2012.jpg
Mithali Raj, Captain of India Women's cricket team

As part of the International Cricket Council's initiative to develop women's cricket, the Women's Cricket Association of India was merged with the Board of Control for Cricket in India in 2006. [19]

In 2021, the BCCI announced that Ramesh Powar would become the Head Coach of the Indian Women's Cricket Team. [20] [21]

Governing body

The Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) is the governing body for the Indian cricket team and first-class cricket in India. The Board has been operating since 1929 and represents India at the International Cricket Council. It is amongst the richest sporting organisations in the world. It sold media rights for India's matches from 2006–2010 for US$612,000,000. [22] It manages the Indian team's sponsorships, its future tours and team selection. The International Cricket Council (ICC) determines India's upcoming matches through its future tours program.

Selection Committee

On 26 September 2020, the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) announced the appointment of All-India Women's Selection Committee. [23] Neetu David, former left-arm spinner, heads the five-member selection committee. [24]

Team colours

Sponsorship for ICC tournaments
TournamentKit manufacturerSleeve sponsor
1973 Women's Cricket World Cup
1978 Women's Cricket World Cup
1982 Hansells Vita Fresh World Cup
1988 Shell Bicentennial Women's World Cup
1993 Women's Cricket World Cup
1997 Hero Honda Women's World Cup Wills
2000 CricInfo Women's Cricket World Cup
2005 Women's Cricket World Cup Sahara
2009 Women's Cricket World Cup Nike
2009 ICC Women's World Twenty20
2010 ICC Women's World Twenty20
2012 ICC Women's World Twenty20
2013 Women's Cricket World Cup
2014 ICC Women's World Twenty20 Star India
2016 ICC Women's World Twenty20
2017 Women's Cricket World Cup Oppo
2018 ICC Women's World Twenty20
2020 ICC Women's T20 World Cup BYJU'S
2022 Women's Cricket World CupMPL Sports
2022 ICC Women's T20 World Cup
Kit sponsorship history
PeriodKit manufacturerShirt sponsor
1993-1996 Wills
1999-2001
2001-2002
2002-2003 Sahara
2003-2005
2005-2013 Nike
2014-2017 Star India
2017-2019 Oppo
2019-2020 BYJU'S
2020-2023MPL Sports

Sponsorship

Current Sponsors & Partners
Team Sponsor BYJU'S
Title Sponsor Paytm
Kit SponsorMPL Sports
Official Partners Dream11
LafargeHolcim
(Ambuja Cements and ACC)
Hyundai Motor India Limited
Official Broadcaster Star Sports

The current sponsor of the team is BYJU's. [25] OPPO's sponsorship was to run from 2017 until 2022, but was handed over to BYJU's on 5 September 2019. [26] Previously, the Indian team was sponsored by Star India from 2014 to 2017, [27] Sahara India Pariwar from 2002 to 2013.

Nike had been a long time kit supplier to team India having acquired the contract in 2005, [28] with two extensions for a period of five years each time; in 2011 [29] and 2016 [30] respectively. Nike ended its contract in September 2020 [31] and MPL Sports Apparel & Accessories, a subsidiary of online gaming platform Mobile Premier League replaced Nike as the kit manufacturer in October 2020. [32] [33] [34]

On 30 August 2019, following the conclusion of the Expression of Interest process for Official Partners’ Rights, the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) announced that Sporta Technologies Pvt. Ltd. (Dream11), LafargeHolcim (ACC Cement and Ambuja Cement) and Hyundai Motor India Ltd. have acquired the Official Partners' Rights for the BCCI International and Domestic matches during 2019-23. [35]

Paytm acquired the title sponsorship for all matches played by the team within India in 2015 [36] and extended the same in 2019 [37] until 2023. Star India and Airtel have been title sponsors previously.

International grounds

Fourteen grounds in India have hosted women's international Test cricket matches. The first women's international Test cricket match hosted in India was held at the M. Chinnaswamy Stadium in Bangalore on 31 October 1976.

Six grounds in India have hosted women's T20I matches. The first women's T20I match hosted in India was held at the Bandra Kurla Complex Ground in Mumbai on 4 March 2010.

Captains

Results and fixtures

The recent results and forthcoming fixtures of India in international cricket:

Bilateral series and tours
DateAgainstH/A/NResults [Matches]
Test WODI WT20I
March 2021 Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa Home1-4 [5]1-2 [3]
June 2021Flag of England.svg  England Away0–0 [1]1–2 [3][3]
September 2021Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Away[1][3][3]
Multiteam series and tournaments
DateSeriesFormatPositionResults [Matches]
March–April 2022 Flag of New Zealand.svg 2022 Women's Cricket World Cup WODI

Players

Former players

Squad

Updated as of 14 Jul 2021.

Uncapped players listed in italics.

Key
SymbolMeaning
C/GContract grade with the BCCI [38]
S/NShirt number of the player in all formats
FormatDenotes the player's playing format
NameAgeBatting styleBowling styleDomestic teamC/GFormsS/N
ODI Captain and Batter
Mithali Raj 38Right-handedRight-arm leg break Railways BTest, ODI3
T20I Captain and All-rounder
Harmanpreet Kaur 32Right-handedRight-arm off break Punjab ATest, ODI, T20I7
Batters
Smriti Mandhana 25Left-handedRight-arm medium Maharashtra ATest, ODI, T20I18
Shafali Verma 17Right-handedRight-arm off break Haryana BTest, ODI, T20I17
Punam Raut 31Right-handedRight-arm off break Railways BTest, ODI14
Jemimah Rodrigues 21Right-handedRight-arm off break Mumbai BODI, T20I5
Priya Punia 25Right-handedRight-arm medium Rajasthan CODI16
All-rounders
Deepti Sharma 24Left-handedRight-arm off break Bengal BTest, ODI, T20I6
Pooja Vastrakar 21Right-handedRight-arm medium-fast Madhya Pradesh CTest, ODI11
Harleen Deol 23Right-handedRight-arm leg break Himachal Pradesh CT20I98
Wicket-keeper
Taniya Bhatia 23Right-handedN/A Punjab BTest, ODI, T20I28
Sushma Verma 28Right-handedN/A Himachal Pradesh -ODI5
Richa Ghosh 17Right-handedN/A Bengal CT20I13
Nuzhat Parween 25Right-handedN/A Railways -T20I7
Indrani Roy 24Right-handedN/A Jharkhand --
Spin Bowlers
Sneh Rana 27Right-handedRight-arm off break Railways -Test, ODI, T20I2
Poonam Yadav 30Right-handedRight-arm leg break Railways AODI, T20I24
Rajeshwari Gayakwad 30Right-handedLeft-arm orthodox Railways BODI, T20I1
Radha Yadav 21Right-handedLeft-arm orthodox Baroda BODI, T20I23
Ekta Bisht 35Right-handedLeft-arm orthodox Railways -ODI8
Pace Bowlers
Jhulan Goswami 38Right-handedRight-arm medium-fast Bengal BTest, ODI25
Shikha Pandey 32Right-handedRight-arm medium-fast Goa BTest, ODI, T20I12
Arundhati Reddy 23Right-handedRight-arm medium-fast Railways CT20I20
Mansi Joshi 28Right-handedRight-arm medium-fast Haryana CODI10
Monica Patel 22Left-handedLeft-arm medium Karnataka -ODI2
Simran Bahadur 21Left-handedRight-arm medium Delhi -T20I

Players' salaries are as follows:

Personnel

Tournament history

World Cup

World Cup record
YearRoundPositionPlayedWonLostTieNR
Flag of England.svg 1973 Did Not Compete
Flag of India.svg 1978 Group Stage4/430300
Flag of New Zealand.svg 1982 Group Stage4/5124800
Flag of Australia (converted).svg 1988 Did Not Compete
Flag of England.svg 1993 Group Stage4/874300
Flag of India.svg 1997 Semi-finals4/1163111
Flag of New Zealand.svg 2000 Semi-finals3/885300
Flag of South Africa.svg 2005 Runners-up2/895202
Flag of Australia (converted).svg 2009 Super 6s3/675200
Flag of India.svg 2013 Group Stage7/842200
Flag of England.svg 2017 Runners-up2/896300
Flag of New Zealand.svg 2022
TOTALRunners-up (2 times)10/1265342713

World Cup Qualifier

World Twenty20 record
YearRoundPositionGPWLTNR
Flag of South Africa.svg 2017 Champions 1/1088000
TOTAL1 Title1/1088000

Women's Championship

Women's Championship record
YearRoundPositionGPWLDTNR
2014-16 Group Stage [lower-alpha 1] 5/821911001
2017-20 Group Stage [lower-alpha 2] 4/821108003
TOTALAdvanced3/8421919004

Twenty20 World Cup

World Twenty20 record
YearPlayedWonLostTieNRPosition
2009 Flag of England.svg 42200Semi-finalists
2010 WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg 42200Semi-finalists
2012 Flag of Sri Lanka.svg 30300Group Stage [40]
2014 Flag of Bangladesh.svg 53200Group Stage
2016 Flag of India.svg 51400Group Stage
2018 WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg 54100Semi-finalists
2020 Flag of Australia (converted).svg 6411Runners-up
2023 Flag of South Africa.svg To Be Decided
Total32161501Runners-up (1 time)

Asia Cup

Asia Cup record
YearPlayedWonLostTieNRPosition
2004 Flag of Sri Lanka.svg 55000Champions
2005–06 Flag of Pakistan.svg 55000Champions
2006 Flag of India.svg 55000Champions
2008 Flag of Sri Lanka.svg 77000Champions
2012 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 44000Champions
2016 Flag of Thailand.svg 66000Champions
2018 Flag of Malaysia.svg 64200Runners-up
Total3836200Champions (6 times)

Individual records

Statistics

One-Day Internationals

Opponent Matches Won Lost Tied No Result % Won FirstLast
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 469370019.5619782018
Flag of Bangladesh.svg  Bangladesh 44000100.0020132017
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 11000100.0019931993
Flag of England.svg  England 7231390244.2819782021
  International XI 33000100.0020132013
Cricket Ireland flag.svg  Ireland 1212000100.0019932017
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 33000100.0019932000
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 4819281038.8819782019
Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan 1010000100.0020052017
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 2715110157.6919972021
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka 292620192.8520002018
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies 252050080.0019932019
Total2801531221455.6119782021
Statistics are correct as of Flag of England.svg  England v Flag of India.svg  India at Worcester, 3rd ODI, 3 July 2021. [41] [42]

Players in bold text are still active with India.

Twenty20 Internationals

Opponent Matches Won Lost Tied No Result % Won FirstLast
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 206140030.0020082020
Flag of Bangladesh.svg  Bangladesh 121020083.3320132020
Flag of England.svg  England 194150021.0520062020
Cricket Ireland flag.svg  Ireland 1100010020182018
Flag of Malaysia.svg  Malaysia 11000100.0020182018
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 12480033.3320092020
Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan 11920081.8120092018
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 13840166.6620142021
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka 181430182.3520092020
Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 11000100.0020182018
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies 181080055.5520112019
Total12668560254.8320062021
Statistics are correct as of Flag of India.svg  India v Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa at Lucknow, 3rd T20I, March 23, 2021. [47] [48]

Test cricket

Test record versus other nations

Opponent Matches Won Lost Draw W/L ratio % Won% Lost% DrawFirstLast
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 90450.000.0044.4455.5519772006
Flag of England.svg  England 1421112.0014.287.1478.5719862021
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 60060.000.000.00100.0019772003
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 2200100.000.000.0020022014
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies 61141.0016.6616.6666.6619762014
Total3756260.8313.5116.2170.2719762021
Statistics are correct as of Flag of England.svg  England v Flag of India.svg  India at Bristol, June 16-19, 2021. [51] [52]

See also

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Notes

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Bibliography

  • Keshav, Karunya; Patnaik, Sidhanta (2018). The Fire Burns Blue: A History of Women's Cricket in India. Chennai: Westland Sport. ISBN   9789387894433.