List of regions of the Netherlands

Last updated
NUTS-1 regions of the Netherlands Landsdeel.png
NUTS-1 regions of the Netherlands

The regions of the Netherlands provides links to both regions and subregions of the Netherlands.

Netherlands Constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Europe

The Netherlands, also called Holland, is a country located in Northwestern Europe with some overseas territories in the Caribbean. In Europe, it consists of 12 provinces that border Germany to the east, Belgium to the south, and the North Sea to the northwest, with maritime borders in the North Sea with those countries and the United Kingdom. Together with three island territories in the Caribbean Sea—Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba—it forms a constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The official language is Dutch, but a secondary official language in the province of Friesland is West Frisian.

Contents

Regions

The regions of the Netherlands are divided in the North, South, West and East Netherlands. Opposed to common practise in other countries, the Dutch regularly do not define the areas of their country according to position, but on the overall position of the province—the most western tip of Gelderland is clearly positioned south to the centre, yet because the province is considered East this area is too.

Gelderland Province of the Netherlands

Gelderland, also known as Guelders in English, is a province of the Netherlands, located in the central eastern part of the country. With a land area of nearly 5,000 km2, it is the largest province of the Netherlands and shares borders with six other provinces and Germany.

Official regions

Many regions in the Netherlands are officially defined by certain regulations of organizations.

First level NUTS of the European Union

NUTS-1 Regional divisions as used by the European Union: [1]

Unofficial multi-country regions

EUREGIO is a cross-border region between the Netherlands and Germany and the first Euroregion. It was founded in 1958 as a German Eingetragener Verein, and has been converted in 2016 into a Public Body based on the 1991 Anholt treaty. Participating communities are in Niedersachsen and Nordrhein-Westfalen (Münsterland) in Germany and parts of the Dutch provinces Gelderland, Overijssel and Drenthe. Participating cities in the region are Münster, Osnabrück, Enschede, and Hengelo.

Ems Dollart Region INTERREG-IV organisation on the Dutch/German border

The Ems Dollart Region (EDR), established in 1977, is a cross-border organisation located in the northern Dutch-German border area. The region is named after the Ems River and the Dollart estuary. Its aim is to establish and improve contacts and levels of interaction between people, companies and organisations within the border region. The organization is based in the Dutch village of Bad Nieuweschans. Here, the office has developed into a Dutch-German center, where cross-border functions and other activities take place. The office also serves as an administration base and launching point for many cross-border projects.

Frisia coastal region on the North Sea in the Netherlands and Germany formerly a historic region with its own language

Frisia is a coastal region along the southeastern corner of the North Sea in what today is mostly a large part of the Netherlands, including modern Friesland and smaller parts of northern Germany. Frisia is the traditional homeland of the Frisians, Germanic people who speak Frisian languages, which together with Anglic languages form the Anglo-Frisian language group.

Unofficial multi-province regions

Bible Belt (Netherlands) region in the Netherlands with the highest concentration of conservative Calvinist Protestants; stretches from Zeeland, through the West-Betuwe and Veluwe, to northern Overijssel

The Bible Belt is a strip of land in the Netherlands with the highest concentration of conservative orthodox Calvinist Protestants in the country. It was named after the Bible Belt of the United States.

The Groene Hart is a relatively thinly populated area in the Dutch Randstad. The major Dutch cities of Rotterdam, The Hague, Leiden, Haarlem, Amsterdam and Utrecht lie around this area. Cities inside the Groene Hart include Zoetermeer, Alphen aan den Rijn, Gouda, Woerden and the smaller cities of Schoonhoven, Oudewater, Haastrecht, Nieuwkoop, Montfoort, Waddinxveen, Bodegraven and Boskoop.

Holland Region and former province on the western coast of the Netherlands

Holland is a region and former province on the western coast of the Netherlands. The name Holland is also frequently used informally to refer to the whole of the country of the Netherlands. This usage is commonly accepted in other countries, and sometimes employed by the Dutch themselves. However, some in the Netherlands, particularly those from regions outside Holland, may find it undesirable or misrepresentative to use the term for the whole country.

Inter-province metropolitan areas

Subregions

The subregions (Dutch: landstreek (plural: landstreken), literally translating to a combination of 'land/country area/region') are non-administrative area in the Netherlands that can be demarcated on grounds of cohesion with regards to culture or landscape. This means that a landstreek is not bound by provincial or municipal boundaries. Below is a list of all Dutch landstreken with the province(s) in which they are located mentioned between brackets.

A

Some of the windmills of Kinderdijk in the northwest of the Alblasserwaard KinderdijkMolens01.jpg
Some of the windmills of Kinderdijk in the northwest of the Alblasserwaard
Hollandse Biesbosch near Dordrecht Biesbosch 1.jpg
Hollandse Biesbosch near Dordrecht

B

D

E

F

G

H

Quintessential landscape of the Holland region: Benthuizen polder, as viewed from a dike Benthuizen dijk polder.jpg
Quintessential landscape of the Holland region: Benthuizen polder, as viewed from a dike

I

K

Dunes of Kennemerland Kennemerland zuid.jpg
Dunes of Kennemerland

L

M

Farmhouse in Veghel, Meierij van 's-Hertogenbosch, North Brabant Brabantsveghel.jpg
Farmhouse in Veghel, Meierij van 's-Hertogenbosch, North Brabant

N

O

Town of Anloo in the Oostermoer landstreek, Drenthe Zicht op Anloo.jpg
Town of Anloo in the Oostermoer landstreek, Drenthe

P

R

Canal in the City of Utrecht, part of the Randstad conurbation Nieuwegracht 2.JPG
Canal in the City of Utrecht, part of the Randstad conurbation

S

Hilly landscape and the town of Eys in South Limburg illustrating the a-typical Dutch landscape of the far-south of the Netherlands Eys.jpg
Hilly landscape and the town of Eys in South Limburg illustrating the a-typical Dutch landscape of the far-south of the Netherlands

T

The Boschplaat nature area on the island of Terschelling, Wadden Islands, Friesland Bosplaat.JPG
The Boschplaat nature area on the island of Terschelling, Wadden Islands, Friesland

U

V

A forest in the geographically diverse Veluwe landstreek, Gelderland Veluweforest.jpg
A forest in the geographically diverse Veluwe landstreek, Gelderland
Town of Harlingen in the Westergo landstreek of Friesland Nordholland Harlingen 2004 003a.jpg
Town of Harlingen in the Westergo landstreek of Friesland

W

Z

Windmills and the river Zaan, Zaanstreek, North Holland River Zaan.jpg
Windmills and the river Zaan, Zaanstreek, North Holland

Related Research Articles

West Low German Group of Low German dialects

West Low German, also known as Low Saxon is a group of Low German dialects spoken in parts of the Netherlands, northwestern Germany and southern Denmark. It is one of two groups of mutually intelligible dialects, the other being East Low German dialects. A 2005 study found that there were approximately 1.8 million "daily speakers" of Low Saxon in the Netherlands.

Provinces of the Netherlands first-level administrative division in the Netherlands

There are currently twelve provinces of the Netherlands, representing the administrative layer between the national government and the local municipalities, with responsibility for matters of subnational or regional importance.

Seventeen Provinces Union of states in the Netherlands in the 15th and 16th centuries

The Seventeen Provinces were the Imperial states of the Habsburg Netherlands in the 16th century. They roughly covered the Low Countries, i.e. what is now the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, and most of the French departments of Nord and Pas-de-Calais (Artois). Also within this area were semi-independent fiefdoms, mainly ecclesiastical ones, such as Liège, Cambrai and Stavelot-Malmedy.

The National Reserve Corps is a part of the Royal Netherlands Army. NATRES is a corps in the sense that it is a regiment which recruits nationally. The part-time reservist is, like all Dutch military personnel, a military volunteer.

The Estates or the States was the assembly of the representatives of the estates of the realm, the divisions of society in feudal times, called together for purposes of deliberation, legislation or taxation. A meeting of the estates that covered an entire kingdom was called an estates general.

Armorial of the Netherlands Wikimedia list article

The coats of arms of the twelve provinces of the Netherlands are shown here.

Water board (Netherlands) Dutch water management authority

Dutch water boards are regional government bodies charged with managing water barriers, waterways, water levels, water quality and sewage treatment in their respective regions. These regional water authorities are among the oldest forms of local government in the Netherlands, some of them having been founded in the 13th century.

States-provincial

A states-provincial is the provincial parliament and legislative assembly in each of the provinces of the Netherlands. It is elected for each province simultaneously once every four years and has the responsibility for matters of sub-national or regional importance. Each states-provincial is directly elected by the voters within the relevant province, and the number of seats in each states-provincial is proportional to its population.

De Hoop is a name used for mills in Belgium and the Netherlands.

Radio Gelderland

Radio Gelderland is a regional public radio station for the Dutch province of Gelderland. Its history started in 1965 when Gelderland joined the RONO. The RONO was already broadcasting for the north and east of the Netherlands. In 1977 RONO split into Radio Noord for Groningen and Drenthe, Radio Fryslân for Friesland and Radio Oost for Overijssel and Gelderland. Since 1985 Radio Gelderland is an independent broadcaster.

The Dutch Amateur Radio Emergency Service (DARES), which was founded on 12 May 2004, is a non-profit organization made out of licensed radio amateurs in the Netherlands. DARES participants are able to set up a national, continental or international radio network in case of an emergency situation, like a power outage on a large scale, a flooding, a cyber attack causing severe damage to communication networks, or other emergency situations, where the safety of a large group of people are in danger.

2019 Dutch provincial elections Dutch provincial elections held in 2019

Provincial elections were held in the Netherlands on 20 March 2019. Eligible voters elected the members of the Provincial States in the twelve provinces of the Netherlands. The elections were held on the same day as the 2019 Dutch water boards elections and, in the Caribbean Netherlands, island council elections.

References

  1. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-05-20. Retrieved 2010-08-22.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)