List of cities in the Netherlands by province

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Map of the major cities in the Netherlands Netherlands map large dutch-10-10-10.png
Map of the major cities in the Netherlands

Below are twelve alphabetical lists of cities in the Netherlands ordered by province.

Contents

Distinctions

There are no formal rules in the Netherlands to distinguish cities from other settlements. Smaller settlements are usually called dorp , comparable with villages in English speaking countries. The Dutch word for city is stad (plural: steden). The intermediate category of town does not exist in the Netherlands.

Historically, there existed systems of city rights, granted by the territorial lords, which defined the status of a place: a stad or dorp. Cities were self-governing and had several privileges. In 1851 the granting of city rights and all privileges and special status of cities were abolished. Since then, the only local administrative unit is the municipality. Regardless of this legal change, many people still use the old city rights as a criterion: certain small settlements proudly call themselves a stad because they historically had city rights, while other, newer towns may not get this recognition.

Geographers and policy makers can distinguish between places with respect to the number of inhabitants or the economic and planological functions within a larger area. Hence, settlements can be considered a city if they function as an urban center in a rural area; while larger population centres in densely populated areas are often neither considered a village nor a city and are usually referred to with the generic word plaats (place). Inhabitants may also base their choice of words just on the subjective way they experience life at a certain place.

When discussing cities, the distinction is sometimes made between the cities in two urban network. The largest urban network is known as "Randstad", including the largest 4 cities in the Netherlands (Amsterdam, Rotterdam, The Hague and Utrecht). The 2nd urban network in the Netherlands is known as 'Brabantstad' A partnership of the Brabant "Big 5" "Eindhoven, Tilburg, Breda, s-Hertogenbosch and Helmond. In addition, there are several medium-sized cities in the Netherlands without an urban network. Groningen, for example, is a medium-sized city (6th city in the Netherlands), without an urban network

List

ProvinceCityProvince Map
Drenthe Assen
Drenthe 2018-P03-Drenthe.jpg
Drenthe
Coevorden
Emmen
Hoogeveen
Meppel
Flevoland Almere
Flevoland 2018-P12-Flevoland.jpg
Flevoland
Biddinghuizen
Emmeloord
Lelystad
Friesland Bolsward
Friesland 2018-P02-Friesland.jpg
Friesland
Dokkum
Franeker
Harlingen
Hindeloopen
IJlst
Leeuwarden
Sloten
Sneek
Stavoren
Workum
Gelderland Apeldoorn
Gelderland 2018-P05-Gelderland.jpg
Gelderland
Arnhem
Bredevoort
Buren
Borculo
Culemborg
Dieren
Doetinchem
Ede
Enspijk
Gendt
Groenlo
Harderwijk
Hattem
Heukelum
Huissen
Nijkerk
Nijmegen
Staverden
Tiel
Ulft
Voorst
Wageningen
Wijchen
Winterswijk
Zaltbommel
Zevenaar
Zutphen
Groningen Appingedam
Groningen 2018-P01-Groningen.jpg
Groningen
Delfzijl
Groningen
Hoogezand-Sappemeer
Stadskanaal
Veendam
Winschoten
Limburg Echt
Limburg 2018-P11-Limburg.jpg
Limburg
Geleen
Gennep
Heerlen
Kerkrade
Tegelen
Kessel
Landgraaf
Maastricht
Montfort
Nieuwstadt
Roermond
Schin op Geul
Sittard
Stein
Susteren
Thorn
Vaals
Valkenburg
Venlo
Weert
North Brabant 's-Hertogenbosch (Den Bosch)
North Brabant 2018-P10-Noord-Brabant.jpg
North Brabant
Bergen op Zoom
Boxtel
Breda
Eindhoven
Geertruidenberg
Geldrop
Grave
Helmond
Heusden
Klundert
Oosterhout
Oss
Ravenstein
Roosendaal
Sint-Oedenrode
Tilburg
Valkenswaard
Veldhoven
Waalwijk
Willemstad
Woudrichem
North Holland Alkmaar
North Holland 2018-P07-Noord-Holland.jpg
North Holland
Amstelveen
Amsterdam
Bussum
Den Helder
Diemen
Edam
Enkhuizen
Haarlem
Heerhugowaard
Hilversum
Hoofddorp
Hoorn
Laren
Medemblik
Monnickendam
Muiden
Naarden
Purmerend
Schagen
Velsen
Volendam
Weesp
Zaanstad
Overijssel Almelo
Overijssel 2018-P04-Overijssel.jpg
Overijssel
Blokzijl
Deventer
Enschede
Genemuiden
Hasselt
Hengelo
Kampen
Oldenzaal
Rijssen
Steenwijk
Vollenhove
Zwolle
South Holland Alphen aan den Rijn
South Holland 2018-P08-Zuid-Holland.jpg
South Holland
Capelle aan den IJssel
Delft
Dordrecht
Gorinchem
Gouda
The Hague (Den Haag)
Leiden
Maassluis
Rotterdam
Schiedam
Spijkenisse
Vlaardingen
Voorburg
Zoetermeer
Utrecht Amersfoort
Utrecht 2018-P06-Utrecht.jpg
Utrecht
Baarn
Bunschoten
Eemnes
Hagestein
Houten
Leerdam
Montfoort
Nieuwegein
Oudewater
Rhenen
Utrecht
Veenendaal
Vianen
Wijk bij Duurstede
Woerden
IJsselstein
Zeist
Zeeland Arnemuiden
Zeeland 2018-P09-Zeeland.jpg
Zeeland
Goes
Hulst
Middelburg
Sluis
Terneuzen
Veere
Vlissingen
Zierikzee

See also

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