Manganese oxalate

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Manganese oxalate
Names
Other names
Manganese(II) oxalate, Manganese(2+) oxalate, Lindbergite
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.010.335 OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg
EC Number
  • 211-367-3
PubChem CID
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C2H2O4.Mn/c3-1(4)2(5)6;/h(H,3,4)(H,5,6);/q;+2/p-2
    Key: RGVLTEMOWXGQOS-UHFFFAOYSA-L
  • C(=O)(C(=O)[O-])[O-].[Mn+2]
Properties
C2MnO4
Molar mass 142.956 g·mol−1
AppearanceLight pink crystals
Density 2.43
insoluble
1.7×107 [1]
Hazards
GHS labelling:
GHS-pictogram-exclam.svg
Warning
H302, H312
P264, P270, P280, P301+P312, P302+P352, P312, P322, P330, P363, P501
Related compounds
Related compounds
Magnesium oxalate
Strontium oxalate
Barium oxalate
Iron(II) oxalate
Iron(III) oxalate
Praseodymium oxalate
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Manganese oxalate is a chemical compound, a salt of manganese and oxalic acid with the chemical formula MnC
2
O
4
. [2] [3] The compound creates light pink crystals, does not dissolve in water, and forms crystalline hydrates. [4] It occurs naturally as the mineral Lindbergite. [5]

Contents

Synthesis

Exchange reaction between sodium oxalate and manganese chloride:

Physical properties

Manganese oxalate forms light pink crystals.

It does not dissolve in water, p Ksp= 6.8.

Forms crystalline hydrates of the composition MnC2O4n H2O, where n = 2 and 3. [6]

Crystalline hydrate of the composition MnC2O4•2H2O forms light pink crystals of the orthorhombic system, space group P212121, cell parameters a = 0.6262 nm, b = 1.3585 nm, c = 0.6091 nm, Z = 4, melts in its own crystallization water at 100°C. [7] [8]

Chemical properties

Decomposes on heating:

Application

See also

Related Research Articles

Oxalic acid Simplest dicarboxylic acid

Oxalic acid is an organic acid with the IUPAC name ethanedioic acid and formula HO2C−CO2H. It is the simplest dicarboxylic acid. It is a white crystalline solid that forms a colorless solution in water. Its name comes from the fact that early investigators isolated oxalic acid from flowering plants of the genus Oxalis, commonly known as wood-sorrels. It occurs naturally in many foods, but excessive ingestion of oxalic acid or prolonged skin contact can be dangerous.

Permanganic acid (or manganic(VII) acid) is the inorganic compound with the formula HMnO4. This strong oxoacid has been isolated as its dihydrate. It is the conjugate acid of permanganate salts. It is the subject of few publications and its characterization as well as its uses are very limited.

Yttrium oxyfluoride is an inorganic chemical compound with the formula YOF. Under normal conditions, the compound is a colorless solid.

Beryllium oxalate Chemical compound

Beryllium oxalate is an inorganic compound, a salt of beryllium metal and oxalic acid with the chemical formula C
2
BeO
4
. It forms colorless crystals, dissolves in water, and also forms crystalline hydrates. The compound is used to prepare ultra-pure beryllium oxide by thermal decomposition.

Lithium oxalate Chemical compound

Lithium oxalate is an inorganic compound, a salt of lithium metal and oxalic acid with the chemical formula C
2
Li
2
O
4
. Lithium oxalate is soluble in water and converts to the oxide when heated.

Praseodymium(III) oxalate is an inorganic compound, a salt of praseodymium metal and oxalic acid with the chemical formula C6O12Pr2. The compound forms light green crystals, insoluble in water, also forms crystalline hydrates.

Copper oxalate Chemical compound

Copper oxalate is an inorganic compound, a salt of copper metal and oxalic acid with the chemical formula CuC
2
O
4
. The compound is practically insoluble in water, alcohol, ether, and acetic acid but soluble in ammonium hydroxide. Copper oxalate forms a hydrate, which forms acid-blue crystals.

Yttrium oxalate Chemical compound

Yttrium oxalate is an inorganic compound, a salt of yttrium and oxalic acid with the chemical formula Y2(C2O4)3. The compound does not dissolve in water and forms crystalline hydrates—colorless crystals.

The carbonate oxalates are mixed anion compounds that contain both carbonate (CO3) and oxalate (C2O4) anions. Most compounds incorporate large trivalent metal ions, such as the rare earth elements. Some carbonate oxalate compounds of variable composition are formed by heating oxalates.

Tin(II) oxalate Chemical compound

Tin(II) oxalate is an inorganic compound, a salt of tin and oxalic acid with the chemical formula SnC
2
O
4
. The compound looks like colorless crystals, does not dissolve in water, and forms crystalline hydrates.

Neptunium (IV) oxalate is an inorganic compound, a salt of neptunium and oxalic acid with the chemical formula Np(C2O4)2. The compound is slightly soluble in water, forms crystalline hydrates—green crystals.

Samarium(III) oxalate is an inorganic compound, a salt of samarium and oxalic acid with the formula Sm2(C2O4)3. The compound does not dissolve in water, forms a crystalline hydrate with yellow crystals.

Actinium(III) nitrate Chemical compound

Actinium (III) nitrate is an inorganic compound, actinium salt of nitric acid with the chemical formula Ac(NO3)3. The compound looks like white substance, readily soluble in water.

Dysprosium(III) nitrate Chemical compound

Dysprosium(III) nitrate is an inorganic compound, a salt of dysprosium and nitric acid with the chemical formula Dy(NO3)3. The compound forms yellowish crystals, dissolves in water, forms a crystalline hydrate.

Holmium(III) nitrate Chemical compound

Holmium (III) nitrate is an inorganic compound, a salt of holmium and nitric acid with the chemical formula Ho(NO3)3. The compound forms yellowish crystals, dissolves in water, also forms crystalline hydrates.

Ytterbium(III) nitrate Chemical compound

Ytterbium (III) nitrate is an inorganic compound, a salt of ytterbium and nitric acid with the chemical formula Yb(NO3)3. The compound forms colorless crystals, dissolves in water, and also forms crystalline hydrates.

Lutetium(III) nitrate is an inorganic compound, a salt of lutetium and nitric acid with the chemical formula Lu(NO3)3. The compound forms colorless crystals, dissolves in water, and also forms crystalline hydrates. The compound is poisonous.

Erbium(III) nitrate is an inorganic compound, a salt of erbium and nitric acid with the chemical formula Er(NO3)3. The compound forms pink crystals, readily soluble in water, also forms crystalline hydrates.

Manganese lactate Chemical compound

Manganese lactate is an organic chemical compound, a salt of manganese and lactic acid with the formula Mn(C3H5O3)2. The compound forms light pink crystals, soluble in water, forming crystalline hydrates.

Praseodymium(III) acetate Compound of praseodymium

Praseodymium(III) acetate is an inorganic salt composed of a Praseodymium atom trication and three acetate groups as anions. This compound commonly forms the dihydrate, Pr(O2C2H3)3·2H2O.

References

  1. John Rumble (June 18, 2018). CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (99 ed.). CRC Press. pp. 5–188. ISBN   978-1138561632.
  2. Lunge, Georg (1924). Lunge and Keane's Technical Methods of Chemical Analysis. 2d Ed., Edited by Charles A. Keane ...and P.C.L. Thorne. Gurney and Jackson. p. 61. Retrieved 5 August 2021.
  3. Young, Philena Anne (1928). The Volumetric Determination of Vanadium and Chromium in Special Alloy Steels: Ceric Sulfate as a Volumetric Oxidizing Agent. Mack Printing Company. p. 74. Retrieved 5 August 2021.
  4. Donkova, B.; Mehandjiev, D. (2004). "Mechanism of decomposition of manganese(II) oxalate dihydrate and manganese(II) oxalate trihydrate". Thermochimica Acta. 421 (1–2): 141–149. doi:10.1016/j.tca.2004.04.001. ISSN   0040-6031 . Retrieved 5 August 2021.
  5. Atencio, Daniel; Coutinho, José M.V.; Graeser, Stefan; Matioli, Paulo A.; Menezes Filho, Luiz A.D. (2004). "Lindbergite, a new Mn oxalate dihydrate from Boca Rica mine, Galiléia, Minas Gerais, Brazil, and other occurrences". American Mineralogist. 89 (7): 1087–1091. doi:10.2138/am-2004-0721. ISSN   1945-3027. S2CID   100604132 . Retrieved 1 December 2021.
  6. Nedyalkova, Miroslava; Antonov, Vladislav (1 January 2018). "Manganese oxalates - structure-based Insights". Open Chemistry. 16 (1): 1176–1183. doi: 10.1515/chem-2018-0123 . ISSN   2391-5420. S2CID   104343447.
  7. Puzan, Anna N.; Baumer, Vyacheslav N.; Lisovytskiy, Dmytro V.; Mateychenko, Pavel V. (1 April 2018). "Structure disordering and thermal decomposition of manganese oxalate dihydrate, MnC2O4·2H2O". Journal of Solid State Chemistry . 260: 87–94. Bibcode:2018JSSCh.260...87P. doi:10.1016/j.jssc.2018.01.022. ISSN   0022-4596 . Retrieved 5 August 2021.
  8. Donkova, Borjana; Avdeev, Georgi (1 August 2015). "Synthesis and decomposition mechanism of γ-MnC2O4·2H2O rods under non-isothermal and isothermal conditions". Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry . 121 (2): 567–577. doi:10.1007/s10973-015-4590-4. ISSN   1588-2926. S2CID   97032400 . Retrieved 5 August 2021.
  9. Ahmad, Tokeer; Ramanujachary, Kandalam V.; Lofland, Samuel E.; Ganguli, Ashok K. (24 November 2004). "Nanorods of manganese oxalate: a single source precursor to different manganese oxide nanoparticles (MnO, Mn2O3, Mn3O4)". Journal of Materials Chemistry . 14 (23): 3406–3410. doi:10.1039/B409010A. ISSN   1364-5501 . Retrieved 5 August 2021.