Preserved counties of Wales

Last updated
The Preserved Counties (Wales)
Preserved Counties Wales.svg
Category Lieutenancy areas
Location Wales
Created byLocal Government (Wales) Act 1994 (c. 19)
Created1 April 1996
Number8 (as of 2008)

The preserved counties of Wales are the current areas used in Wales for the ceremonial purposes of lieutenancy and shrievalty. They are based on the counties created by the Local Government Act 1972 and used for local government and other purposes between 1974 and 1996.

Contents

Usage

The Local Government (Wales) Act 1994 abolished the eight ceremonial counties created by the Local Government Act 1972. However, it created the concept of preserved counties based on their areas, to be used for purposes such as Lieutenancy. This usage was consolidated by the Lieutenancies Act 1997. [1]

Certain statutes already in force were amended to include reference to them — as of 16 February 2011, the only remaining provisions still extant are: [2] [ disputed ]

Boundary changes

The preserved counties were originally almost identical to the 1974–96 counties, but with a few minor changes in line with local government boundary changes: Llanrhaeadr-ym-Mochnant, Llansilin and Llangedwyn were transferred from Clwyd to Powys, and Wick, St Brides Major, Ewenny and Pentyrch were transferred from Mid Glamorgan to South Glamorgan. There were however two local government areas, Caerphilly and Conwy, split between preserved counties.

The Local Government Boundary Commission for Wales were instructed by the National Assembly for Wales on 11 March 2002 to undertake a review of preserved county boundaries. In their final proposals the part of the local government area of Caerphilly which had been in Mid Glamorgan was to be part of Gwent and the part of the local government area of Conwy which had been in Gwynedd was to be part of Clwyd. The boundary between Mid Glamorgan and South Glamorgan was also to be re-aligned to reflect small changes in local government boundaries. [2] The Assembly accepted these proposals such that from 2 April 2003 each preserved county encompassed between one and five whole local government areas. [3]

The boundary between West Glamorgan and Powys was further modified on 1 April 2005 as a result of boundary changes between Ystalyfera and Ystradgynlais. [4]

The boundary between Mid Glamorgan and Powys was further modified on 1 April 2010 to reflect the 2009 local government boundary changes in the area around Vaynor, Merthyr Tydfil. [5]

List

The population figures are mid-year estimates for 2007 from the Office for National Statistics, grouping component unitary authority area figures into their respective preserved counties. [6]

NameComprisesArea (km²)Population
Clwyd Conwy
Denbighshire
Flintshire
Wrexham
2,910491,100
Dyfed Carmarthenshire
Ceredigion
Pembrokeshire
5,780375,200
Gwent Blaenau Gwent
Caerphilly
Monmouthshire
Newport
Torfaen
1,553560,500
Gwynedd Gwynedd
Isle of Anglesey
3,262187,400
Mid Glamorgan Bridgend
Merthyr Tydfil
Rhondda Cynon Taf
781423,200
Powys Powys 5,196132,000
South Glamorgan Cardiff
Vale of Glamorgan
475445,000
West Glamorgan Neath Port Talbot
Swansea
820365,500

See also

Related Research Articles

Gwynedd A county in Wales, adjacent to Powys, Conwy, Anglesey, and Ceredigion

Gwynedd is a county in Wales, sharing borders with Powys, Conwy, Denbighshire, Anglesey over the Menai Strait, and Ceredigion over the River Dyfi. The scenic Llŷn Peninsula and most of Snowdonia National Park are in Gwynedd. Bangor is the home of Bangor University. In the northern part of the county, the other main settlements are Caernarfon, Bethesda, Ffestiniog, Porthmadog and Pwllheli. The largest settlement in the south is Tywyn.

Powys Place in Wales

Powys is a principal area and county, and one of the preserved counties of Wales. It is named after the Kingdom of Powys which was a Welsh successor state, petty kingdom and principality that emerged during the Middle Ages following the end of Roman rule in Britain.

Since 1 April 1996, Wales has been divided into 22 single-tier principal areas for local government purposes. The elected councils of these areas are responsible for the provision of all local government services, including education, social work, environmental protection, and most highways. Below these there are also elected community councils to which responsibility for specific aspects of the application of local policy may be devolved.

Ceremonial counties of England Collective name for areas, in England, to which a Lord Lieutenant is appointed

The counties and areas for the purposes of the lieutenancies, also referred to as the lieutenancy areas of England and informally known as ceremonial counties, are areas of England to which lords-lieutenant are appointed. Legally, the areas in England, as well as in Wales and Scotland, are defined by the Lieutenancies Act 1997 as "counties and areas for the purposes of the lieutenancies in Great Britain", in contrast to the areas used for local government. They are also informally known as "geographic counties", to distinguish them from other types of counties of England.

Denbighshire County and Principal area in Wales

Denbighshire is a county in north-east Wales. This part of Wales contains the country's oldest known evidence of inhabitation – Pontnewydd (Bontnewydd-Llanelwy) Palaeolithic site has Neanderthal remains from 225,000 years ago. Castles include Denbigh, Rhuddlan, Ruthin, Castell Dinas Bran and Bodelwyddan. St Asaph, one of Britain's smallest cities, has one of its smallest Anglican cathedrals. Denbighshire is bounded by coastline to the north and hills to the east, south and west. The River Clwyd creates a broad fertile valley with little industry. Crops appear in the Vale of Clwyd and cattle and sheep in the uplands. The coast attracts tourists; hikers frequent the Clwydian Range, forming an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty with the upper Dee Valley. Llangollen hosts the Llangollen International Musical Eisteddfod each July.

Denbighshire (historic)

Historic Denbighshire is one of thirteen traditional counties in Wales, a vice-county and a former administrative county, which covers an area in north east Wales. It is a maritime county, bounded to the north by the Irish Sea, to the east by Flintshire, Cheshire and Shropshire, to the south by Montgomeryshire and Merionethshire, and to the west by Caernarfonshire.

Mid Glamorgan

Mid Glamorgan is a preserved county of Wales. From 1974 until 1996 it was also an administrative county with a county council.

Clwyd Preserved county of Wales

Clwyd is a preserved county of Wales, situated in the north-east corner of the country; it is named after the River Clwyd, which runs through the area. To the north lies the Irish Sea, with the English ceremonial counties of Cheshire to the east and Shropshire to the south-east. Powys and Gwynedd lie to the south and west respectively. Clwyd also shares a maritime boundary with Merseyside along the River Dee. Between 1974 and 1996, a slightly different area had a county council, with local government functions shared with six district councils. In 1996, Clwyd was abolished, and the new unitary authorities of Wrexham, Conwy County Borough, Denbighshire, and Flintshire were created; under this reorganisation, "Clwyd" became a preserved county, with the name being retained for certain ceremonial functions.

Caerphilly County Borough county borough

Caerphilly is a county borough in southern Wales, straddling the ancient county boundary between Glamorgan and Monmouthshire. It is governed by Caerphilly County Borough Council.

North Wales undefined region in Wales

North Wales is the northernmost region of Wales. It is bordered by the principal areas of Ceredigion, Powys, and the rest of Wales to the south, England and its counties of Shropshire, and Cheshire to the east, and the Irish Sea to the north and west. It is highly mountainous and rural, with Snowdonia National Park, known for its mountains, waterfalls and trails, located wholly within the region. North Wales has no official designation; it is mostly used for organising the 6 northern principal areas for the public purposes of health, policing and emergency services, and for statistical, economic and cultural purposes.

Local Government Act 1972 United Kingdom legislation

The Local Government Act 1972 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that reformed local government in England and Wales on 1 April 1974. It was one of the most significant Acts of Parliament to be passed by the Heath Government of 1970–74 and is surpassed only by the European Communities Act 1972 which took the United Kingdom into the European Communities.

Local Government (Wales) Act 1994 United Kingdom legislation

The Local Government (Wales) Act 1994 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom which amended the Local Government Act 1972 to create the current local government structure in Wales of 22 unitary authority areas, referred to as principal areas in the Act, and abolished the previous two-tier structure of counties and districts. It came into effect on 1 April 1996.

Gwent (county)

Gwent is a preserved county and a former local government county in south-east Wales. It was formed on 1 April 1974, under the Local Government Act 1972, and was named after the ancient Kingdom of Gwent. The authority was a successor to both the administrative county of Monmouthshire and the county borough of Newport.

The history of local government Wales in a recognisably modern form emerged during the late 19th century.

Outline of Wales Overview of and topical guide to Wales

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to Wales:

References

  1. "23", Lieutenancies Act, UK: OPSI, 1997.
  2. 1 2 Review of Preserved County Boundaries Final Proposals, UK: Local Government Boundary Commission for Wales, archived from the original on 2016-05-07.
  3. "Preserved Counties (Amendment to Boundaries) (Wales) Order", Legislation, UK: OPSI, 2003.
  4. "The Neath Port Talbot and Powys (Cwmtwrch) Order 2004". 13 October 2004.
  5. "The Preserved Counties of Powys and Mid Glamorgan (Changes in Area) Order 2010". www.opsi.gov.uk. Retrieved February 10, 2019.
  6. Statistics.gov.uk Archived 2011-07-28 at the Wayback Machine