Telecommunications equipment

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Telecommunications equipment (also telecoms equipment or communications equipment) is a hardware which is used for the purposes of telecommunications. Since the 1990s the boundary between telecoms equipment and IT hardware has become blurred as a result of the growth of the internet and its increasing role in the transfer of telecoms data. [1] [2]

Contents

Types

Telecommunications equipment can be broadly broken down into the following categories: [3]

Semiconductors

Most of the essential elements of modern telecommunication are built from MOSFETs (metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors), including mobile devices, transceivers, base station modules, routers, RF power amplifiers, [4] microprocessors, memory chips, and telecommunication circuits. [5] As of 2005, telecommunications equipment account for 16.5% of the annual microprocessor market. [6]

Vendors

The world's largest telecommunications equipment vendors by revenues in 2017 are: [7]

Largest vendors by 2017 revenue (billion US dollars)
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Huawei $92.55
Flag of the United States.svg Cisco Systems $48.00
Flag of Japan.svg Fujitsu $38.57
Flag of Finland.svg Nokia $27.73
Flag of Sweden.svg Ericsson $24.16
Flag of Japan.svg NEC Corporation $23.95
Flag of the United States.svg Qualcomm $22.29
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg ZTE $16.71
Flag of the United States.svg Corning $10.12
Flag of the United States.svg Motorola Solutions $6.38
Flag of the United States.svg Juniper Networks $5.03
Flag of the United States.svg Ciena $2.80
Largest by country (2017)
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China$109.26
Flag of the United States.svg United States$94.62
Flag of Japan.svg Japan$62.52
Flag of Finland.svg Finland$27.73
Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden$24.16

See also

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References

  1. "Telecoms equipment - We have the technology". The Economist. 1 October 1998. Retrieved 21 July 2012.
  2. "Twisted pair - Nokia and Siemens pool their network divisions to form a new firm". The Economist. 22 June 2006. Retrieved 21 July 2012.
  3. Ypsilanti, Dimitri; Plantin, Amy (1991). Telecommunications Equipment: Changing Markets and Trade Structures. OECD Publishing. p. 16. ISBN   9789264135536.
  4. Asif, Saad (2018). 5G Mobile Communications: Concepts and Technologies. CRC Press. pp. 128–134. ISBN   9780429881343.
  5. Colinge, Jean-Pierre; Greer, James C. (2016). Nanowire Transistors: Physics of Devices and Materials in One Dimension. Cambridge University Press. p. 2. ISBN   9781107052406.
  6. Asthana, Rajiv; Kumar, Ashok; Dahotre, Narendra B. (2006). Materials Processing and Manufacturing Science. Elsevier. p. 488. ISBN   9780080464886.
  7. "Telecommunication equipment companies ranked by overall revenue in 2017 (in billion U.S. dollars)". Statista.com. Retrieved August 8, 2019.