UCI Track Cycling World Cup

Last updated
UCI Track Cycling World Cup
Cycling current event.svg 2018–19 UCI Track Cycling World Cup
UCI Track Cycling World Cup Logo.jpg
Race details
DateOctober–February
RegionWorldwide
Discipline Track
TypeSeries
History
First edition 1993
Editions27 (as of 2018–19)
Most winsFlag of Germany.svg  Germany (10 titles)
Most recentFlag of Australia.svg  Australia (1st title)

The UCI Track Cycling World Cup (formerly known as the UCI Track Cycling World Cup Classics) is a multi race tournament held over a track cycling season - usually between October and February. Each series is divided into several rounds, each held in a different country.

Track cycling type of sport

Track cycling is a bicycle racing sport usually held on specially built banked tracks or velodromes using track bicycles.

Contents

Format

The UCI Track Cycling World Cup is a key event within the Track Cycling calendar, with only the World Championships and the Olympic Games attracting more World Ranking points. [1]

The UCI Track Cycling World Championships are the set of world championship events for the various disciplines and distances in track cycling. They are regulated by the Union Cycliste Internationale. Before 1900, they were administered by the UCI's predecessor, the International Cycling Association (ICA).

Cycling at the Summer Olympics

Cycling has been contested at every Summer Olympic Games since the birth of the modern Olympic movement at the 1896 Summer Olympics, at which a road race and five track events were held. Mountain bike racing entered the Olympic programme at the Atlanta Olympics, followed by BMX racing in 2008. Prior to the upcoming 2020 Summer Olympics, all events were speed races, but the 2020 programme will feature BMX freestyle for the first time.

The UCI Track Cycling World Ranking is a track cycling ranking system based upon the results in all men's and women's UCI-sanctioned races over a twelve-month period. The ranking includes an individual and a nations ranking and includes the disciplines: individual pursuit, points race, scratch, sprint, time trial, keirin, omnium, team pursuit, team sprint and madison.

The series is open to national teams and registered trade teams who compete over a number of track cycling disciplines. The overall classification is decided on a points system with riders or teams amassing points in each discipline competed during each round of the series. The rider or team that has the greatest number of points in each discipline wears a white jersey in that discipline in the following round to denote their status as leader. The World Cup trophy is presented to the nation with the greatest number of points in each discipline at the end of the final round of the series. [1]

Cycling jersey color-coded jerseys to indicate the posiiton of riders in cycling competitions

A cycling jersey is a specialized jersey for cycling. While the vast majority of cyclists worldwide wear conventional clothing while riding, a jersey offers certain advantages for the sport-oriented cyclist. A cycling jersey is cut long in the back to accommodate the bent-over position used in sport-oriented cycling. Any pockets on the jersey are placed on the back panel as front pockets would tend to spill. The zipper is often made very long so that the cyclist can open up the jersey to allow for ventilation. The cycling jersey is usually worn with a tight fit in order to reduce air resistance. Jerseys are made from a material designed to wick moisture from the skin, keeping the cyclist cooler and more comfortable.

The inaugural round of the UCI Track Cycling World Cup Classics (as it was then known) was held in Copenhagen, Denmark in May 1993. [2] The series is held over a track cycling season which was initially between February and June of each year; however since 2004–05 this has changed to between October and February. The number of rounds within each series has varied each year but has generally been between 3 and 6 rounds.

Copenhagen Capital of Denmark

Copenhagen is the capital and most populous city of Denmark. As of July 2018, the city has a population of 777,218. It forms the core of the wider urban area of Copenhagen and the Copenhagen metropolitan area. Copenhagen is situated on the eastern coast of the island of Zealand; another small portion of the city is located on Amager, and is separated from Malmö, Sweden, by the strait of Øresund. The Øresund Bridge connects the two cities by rail and road.

Denmark constitutional monarchy in Europe

Denmark, officially the Kingdom of Denmark, is a Nordic country and the southernmost of the Scandinavian nations. Denmark lies southwest of Sweden and south of Norway, and is bordered to the south by Germany. The Kingdom of Denmark also comprises two autonomous constituent countries in the North Atlantic Ocean: the Faroe Islands and Greenland. Denmark proper consists of a peninsula, Jutland, and an archipelago of 443 named islands, with the largest being Zealand, Funen and the North Jutlandic Island. The islands are characterised by flat, arable land and sandy coasts, low elevation and a temperate climate. Denmark has a total area of 42,924 km2 (16,573 sq mi), land area of 42,394 km2 (16,368 sq mi), and the total area including Greenland and the Faroe Islands is 2,210,579 km2 (853,509 sq mi), and a population of 5.8 million.

The 2004–2005 UCI Track Cycling World Cup Classics is a multi race tournament over a season of track cycling. The season ran from 5 November 2004 to 20 February 2005. The World Cup is organised by the UCI.

The name UCI Track Cycling World Cup was adopted from the 2011–12 series.

The 2011–12 UCI Track Cycling World Cup was a multi-race tournament over a season of track cycling. The season ran from 4 November 2011 to 19 February 2012. The World Cup is organised by the Union Cycliste Internationale. In this edition the World Cup consisted of four rounds in Astana, Cali, Beijing and London.

Hosts

Times hosted
HostsEditions hosted
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 16
Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 15
Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 11
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 9
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 8
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 7
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 6
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 5
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 4
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark, Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada, Flag of Greece.svg  Greece 3
Flag of Hong Kong.svg  Hong Kong, Flag of France.svg  France, Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand, Flag of Poland.svg  Poland, Flag of Malaysia.svg  Malaysia 2
Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba, Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador, Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands, Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan
Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus, Flag of Chile.svg  Chile, Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa, Flag of Spain.svg  Spain, Flag of Japan.svg  Japan
1

History

The German team (pictured in Glasgow) won the World Cup trophy in 2012-13 Deutsche Mannschaft feiert Sieg.JPG
The German team (pictured in Glasgow) won the World Cup trophy in 2012–13

A summary of the World Cup trophy winning nations by year is shown below: [3] [4]

SeriesRoundsWinning Nation
1993 2Flag of France.svg  France
1994 4Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
1995 6Flag of France.svg  France
1996 5Flag of France.svg  France
1997 6Flag of France.svg  France
1998 4Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
1999 5Flag of France.svg  France
2000 5Flag of France.svg  France
2001 5Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
2002 5Flag of the United States.svg  United States
2003 4Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
2004 4Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
2004–05 4Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands
2005–06 4Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands
2006–07 4Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands
2007–08 4Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands
2008–09 5Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
2009–10 4Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
SeriesRoundsWinning Nation
2010–11 4Flag of France.svg  France
2011–12 4Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
2012–13 3Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
2013–14 3Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
2014–15 3Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
2015–16 3Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
2016–17 4Flag of France.svg  France
2017–18 5Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
2018–19 6Flag of Australia.svg  Australia

Related Research Articles

Manchester Velodrome event arena

Manchester Velodrome is an indoor Olympic-standard cycle-racing track in Manchester, England, which opened in 1994. Part of the National Cycling Centre, the facility has been home to British Cycling since 1994 and the five time Tour de France-winning UCI ProTeam Team Sky since it formed in 2009. The Manchester Velodrome has been cited as the major catalyst for Britain's successes in track and road cycling and has been described by Cycling Weekly as the "beating heart of British Cycling’s ascension to the top of world cycling".

Mountain bike racing

Mountain bike racing is the competitive cycle sport discipline of mountain biking held on off-road terrain. The Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) recognised the discipline relatively late in 1990, when it sanctioned the world championships in Durango, Colorado. The first UCI Mountain Bike World Cup series took place in 1988. Its nine-race circuit covered two continents—Europe and North America—and was sponsored by Grundig. Cross-country racing was the only World Cup sport at this time. In 1993, a six-event downhill World Cup was introduced. In 1996, cross-country mountain biking events were added to the Olympic Games. In 2006, cross-country mountain biking events became part of the World Deaf Cycling Championships for the first time in San Francisco, USA.

The 2008–2009 UCI Track Cycling World Cup Classics was a multi race competition over a season of track cycling. The season ran from 31 October 2008 to 18 February 2009. The World Cup is organised by the Union Cycliste Internationale.

Revolution is a series of track cycling events primarily held at the Manchester Velodrome in the north west of England. It was solely held in Manchester between 2003 and 2012. From Season 10 (2012-2013) meetings have been held additionally at the new UK velodromes; in the Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome, Glasgow, the Olympic Velodrome, London from Season 11 (2013-2014) and the Derby Arena from 2015-16.

The 2010–2011 UCI Track Cycling World Cup Classics was a multi race tournament over a season of track cycling. The season ran from 2 December 2010 to 20 February 2011. The World Cup is organised by the Union Cycliste Internationale.

The 2012–2013 UCI Track Cycling World Cup is a multi race tournament over a track cycling. It was the twenty-first series of the UCI Track Cycling World Cup organised by the Union Cycliste Internationale. The series ran from 11 October 2012 to 19 January 2013 and consisted of three rounds in Cali, Glasgow and Aguascalientes.

The fifth round of the women's individual pursuit of the 2008–2009 UCI Track Cycling World Cup Classics took place in Copenhagen, Denmark on 13 February 2009. 16 athletes participated in the contest.

The fifth round of the women's team pursuit of the 2008–2009 UCI Track Cycling World Cup Classics took place in Copenhagen, Denmark on 15 February 2009. 10 teams participated in the contest.

The fourth round of the women's team pursuit of the 2007–2008 UCI Track Cycling World Cup Classics took place in Copenhagen, Denmark on 17 February 2008. Six teams of three riders participated in the contest.

The fourth round of the women's points race of the 2007–08 UCI Track Cycling World Cup Classics took place in Copenhagen, Denmark on 16 February 2008. 45 athletes participated in the contest.

The fourth round of the women's scratch race of the 2007–08 UCI Track Cycling World Cup Classics took place in Copenhagen, Denmark on 15 February 2008.

2013–14 UCI Track Cycling World Cup

The 2013–2014 UCI Track Cycling World Cup was a multi race tournament over a track cycling season. It was the twenty-second series of the UCI Track Cycling World Cup organised by the Union Cycliste Internationale. The series ran from 1 November 2013 to 19 January 2014 and consisted of three rounds in Manchester, Aguascalientes and Guadalajara.

2014–15 UCI Track Cycling World Cup

The 2014–2015 UCI Track Cycling World Cup was a multi race tournament over a track cycling season. It was the twenty-third series of the UCI Track Cycling World Cup organised by the Union Cycliste Internationale. The series ran from 8 November 2014 to 18 January 2015 and consisted of three rounds in Guadalajara, London and Cali.

The 2015–16 UCI Track Cycling World Cup was a multi-race tournament over a track cycling season. It was the 24th series of the UCI Track Cycling World Cup organised by the UCI. The series ran from 30 October 2015 to 17 January 2016 and consisted of three rounds in Cali, Cambridge and Hong Kong.

The 2016–17 UCI Track Cycling World Cup was a multi-race series over a track cycling season. It was the 25th edition of the UCI Track Cycling World Cup organised by the UCI. The series ran from 4 November 2016 to 26 February 2017 and consisted of four rounds.

The 2017–18 UCI Track Cycling World Cup was a multi-race tournament over a track cycling season. It was the 26th series of the UCI Track Cycling World Cup organised by the UCI. The series was run from 3 November 2017 to 21 January 2018 and consisted of five rounds.

The 2018–19 UCI Track Cycling World Cup was a multi-race tournament over a track cycling season. It was the 27th series of the UCI Track Cycling World Cup organised by the UCI.

The 2018–19 Six Day Series (also known as the Six Day Cycling Series is a multi six-day track cycling race tournament over a season. It is the 3rd series organised by the Madison Sports Group. This season consists of 7 events across 5 countries.

References

  1. 1 2 "UCI Cycling Regulations - Part 3: Track Races" (PDF). Retrieved 21 October 2013.
  2. "Track World Cup - Facts & Figures" . Retrieved 21 October 2013.
  3. "UCI Track Cycling World Cup - Previous Editions" . Retrieved 21 October 2013.
  4. "Track World Cup - Honour Roll" . Retrieved 21 October 2013.