World Para Ice Hockey Championships

Last updated
World Para Ice Hockey Championships
Sport Para ice hockey
Founded1996
Country IPC members
Continent IPC (International)
Most recent
champion(s)
Flag of the United States.svg  United States (4th title)
Most titlesFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
(4 titles)

The World Para Ice Hockey Championships, known before 30 November 2016 as the IPC Ice Sledge Hockey World Championships, are the world championships for sledge hockey. They are organised by the International Paralympic Committee through its World Para Ice Hockey subcommittee.

Sledge hockey form of ice hockey mainly practiced by people with disabilities

Sledge hockey is an adaptation of ice hockey designed for players who have a physical disability. Invented in the early 1960's at a rehabilitation centre in Stockholm, Sweden, and played under similar rules to standard ice hockey, players are seated on sleds and use special hockey sticks with metal "teeth" on the tips of their handles to navigate the ice.

International Paralympic Committee global governing body for the paralympic movement

The International Paralympic Committee is an international non-profit organisation and the global governing body for the Paralympic Movement. The IPC organizes the Paralympic Games and functions as the international federation for nine sports. Founded on 22 September 1989 in Düsseldorf, Germany, its mission is to "enable Paralympic athletes to achieve sporting excellence and inspire and excite the world". Furthermore, the IPC wants to promote the Paralympic values and to create sport opportunities for all persons with a disability, from beginner to elite level.

Contents

The first sanctioned World Para Ice Hockey Championships were held in Nynäshamn, Sweden in 1996. [1]

On 30 November 2016, the IPC, which serves as the international governing body for 10 disability sports, adopted the "World Para" branding across all of those sports. At the same time, it changed the official name of the sport from "sledge hockey" to "Para Ice hockey". The name of the world championships was immediately changed to "World Para Ice Hockey Championships" (WPIHC). [2]

Pool A

Results

YearHostGold medal gameBronze medal game
GoldScoreSilverBronzeScoreFourth place
1996 Flag of Sweden.svg
Nynäshamn
Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
3–2Flag of Norway.svg
Norway
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
3–1Flag of Estonia.svg
Estonia
2000 Flag of the United States.svg
Utah
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
2–1Flag of Norway.svg
Norway
Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
5–1Flag of Japan.svg
Japan
2004 Flag of Sweden.svg
Örnsköldsvik
Flag of Norway.svg
Norway
2–1Flag of the United States.svg
United States
Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
3–0Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
2008 Flag of the United States.svg
Marlborough
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
3–2Flag of Norway.svg
Norway
Flag of the United States.svg
United States
3–1Flag of Japan.svg
Japan
2009 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg
Ostrava
Flag of the United States.svg
United States
1–0Flag of Norway.svg
Norway
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
2–0Flag of Japan.svg
Japan
2012 Flag of Norway.svg
Hamar
Flag of the United States.svg
United States
5–1Flag of South Korea.svg
South Korea
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
2–0Flag of the Czech Republic.svg
Czech Republic
2013 Flag of South Korea.svg
Goyang
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
1–0Flag of the United States.svg
United States
Flag of Russia.svg
Russia
3–0Flag of the Czech Republic.svg
Czech Republic
2015 Flag of the United States.svg
Buffalo
Flag of the United States.svg
United States
3–0Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
Flag of Russia.svg
Russia
2–1
OT
Flag of Norway.svg
Norway
2017 Flag of South Korea.svg
Gangneung
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
4–1Flag of the United States.svg
United States
Flag of South Korea.svg
South Korea
3–1Flag of Norway.svg
Norway
2019 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg
Ostrava
Flag of the United States.svg
United States
3–2
OT
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
Flag of South Korea.svg
South Korea
4–1Flag of the Czech Republic.svg
Czech Republic

Medal table

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1Flag of the United States.svg  United States  (USA)4318
2Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada  (CAN)4239
3Flag of Norway.svg  Norway  (NOR)1405
4Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden  (SWE)1023
5Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea  (KOR)0123
6Flag of Russia.svg  Russia  (RUS)0022
Totals (6 nations)10101030

Participating nations

Team Flag of Sweden.svg
1996
Flag of the United States.svg
2000
Flag of Sweden.svg
2004
Flag of the United States.svg
2008
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg
2009
Flag of Norway.svg
2012
Flag of South Korea.svg
2013
Flag of the United States.svg
2015
Flag of South Korea.svg
2017
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg
2019
Total
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 3rd1st4th1st3rd3rd1st2nd1st2nd10
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic 5th4th4th7th4th5
Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia 4th5th8th8th4
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 7th5th8th6th7th5
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 5th1
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 6th6th6th5th5th5th6th7
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 6th4th6th4th4th7th8th8th8
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 2nd2nd1st2nd2nd5th6th4th4th5th10
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 3rd3rd2
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea 7th7th2nd7th3rd3rd6
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 1st3rd3rd8th6th7th6
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 5th6th2nd3rd1st1st2nd1st2nd1st10

Pool B

YearHostGold medal gameBronze medal game
GoldScoreSilverBronzeScoreFourth place
2008 Flag of the United States.svg
Marlborough
Flag of South Korea.svg
South Korea
2–0Flag of the Czech Republic.svg
Czech Republic
Flag of Estonia.svg
Estonia
8–2Flag of Poland.svg
Poland
2009 Flag of the Netherlands.svg
Eindhoven
Flag of Estonia.svg
Estonia
1–0Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
Flag of Poland.svg
Poland
5–1Flag of the United Kingdom.svg
Great Britain
2012 Flag of Serbia.svg
Novi Sad
Flag of Russia.svg
Russia
1–0Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
8–1Flag of Poland.svg
Poland
2013 Flag of Japan.svg
Nagano
Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
3–2Flag of Japan.svg
Japan
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg
Great Britain
3–2Flag of Estonia.svg
Estonia
2015 Flag of the Netherlands.svg
Eindhoven
Flag of South Korea.svg
South Korea
Robin roundFlag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
Flag of Slovakia.svg
Slovakia
Robin roundFlag of Poland.svg
Poland
2016 Flag of Japan.svg
Tomakomai
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg
Czech Republic
6–0Flag of Japan.svg
Japan
Flag of Slovakia.svg
Slovakia
5–1Flag of the United Kingdom.svg
Great Britain
2019

Pool C

YearHostGoldSilverBronze
2016 Flag of Serbia.svg
Novi Sad
Flag of Austria.svg
Austria
Flag of Finland.svg
Finland
Netherlands and Belgium hybrid.png
Belgium/Netherlands
2018 Flag of Finland.svg
Vierumäki
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg
China
Flag of Finland.svg
Finland
Flag of Australia (converted).svg
Australia

See also

Sledge hockey tournaments have been staged at the Paralympic Games since 1994 in Lillehammer.

The IPC Ice Sledge Hockey European Championships is the name commonly used to refer to the European ice sledge hockey championships. The European Championship is also a qualifying tournament for the IPC Ice Sledge Hockey World Championships and the Paralympic Games.

Ice Hockey World Championships recurring international ice hockey tournament for mens national teams

The Ice Hockey World Championships are an annual international men's ice hockey tournament organized by the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF). First officially held at the 1920 Summer Olympics, it is the sport's highest profile annual international tournament.

Related Research Articles

1994 Winter Paralympics

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World Para Alpine Skiing Championships

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The 2nd IPC Ice Sledge Hockey European Championships was held between November 18, 2007 and November 24, 2007 at Palaghiaccio Ice Rink in Pinerolo, Turin, Italy. Participating 100 athletes from seven nations: Czech Republic, Estonia, Germany, Norway, Italy, Poland, Sweden. Pinerolo, a town of 35,000, located 50 km (31 mi) from Turin, was the host of 2006 Winter Olympics curling events. The Ice Sledge Hockey European Championships tournament was organised under the aegis of the EPC and the IPC by a Committee made up of Turin Olympic Park, operators of the Palaghiaccio, the Municipality of Pinerolo and the Alioth Sports Society, affiliated to the C.I.P. under its president Paolo Covato and vice president Tiziana Nasi.

Winter Paralympic Games international multi-sport event where athletes with physical disabilities compete in snow & ice sports

The Winter Paralympic Games is an international multi-sport event where athletes with physical disabilities compete in snow & ice sports. This includes athletes with mobility disabilities, amputations, blindness, and cerebral palsy. The Winter Paralympic Games are held every four years directly following the Winter Olympic Games. The Winter Paralympics are also hosted by the city that hosted the Winter Olympics. The International Paralympic Committee (IPC) oversees the Winter Paralympics. Medals are awarded in each event: with gold medals for first place, silver for second and bronze for third, following the tradition that the Olympic Games started in 1904.

The World Para Swimming Championships, known before 30 November 2016 as the IPC Swimming World Championships, are the world championships for swimming where athletes with a disability compete. They are organised by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC). Previously on a four-year rotation, the championships are now held biennially, a year after the regional championships and year prior to the Paralympic Games.

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Brad Bowden Canadian ice sledge hockey player

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Billy Bridges Canadian ice sledge hockey player

Billy Bridges is a Canadian ice sledge hockey and wheelchair basketball player. Born in Summerside, he has spina bifida. On July 1, 2011, Bridges married former Olympic women's ice hockey player Sami Jo Small.

Sledge hockey classification is the classification process for people who play ice sledge hockey. The classification system is governed by the International Paralympic Committee Ice Sledge Hockey.

The World Para Powerlifting Championships, known before 30 November 2016 as the IPC Powerlifting World Championships, is an event organized by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC). Competitors with a physical disability compete, and in a few events athletes with an intellectual disability compete. First held in 1994, the competition is held every four years.

The World Shooting Para Sport Championships, originally known as the IPC Shooting World Championships, are the world championships for shooting where athletes with a disability compete. They are organised by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) on a four year rotation with the Paralympic Games.

Australian mens national para ice hockey team

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References

  1. Important Dates, Hockey Canada
  2. "The IPC to rebrand the 10 sports it acts as International Federation for" (Press release). International Paralympic Committee. 30 November 2016. Retrieved 13 December 2016.