World Para Alpine Skiing Championships

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Alexandr Alyabyev of Russia. 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships at La Molina in Spain. Day 2 of competition. Super-G final. Alexandr Alyabyev.JPG
Alexandr Alyabyev of Russia. 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships at La Molina in Spain. Day 2 of competition. Super-G final.

The World Para Alpine Skiing Championships, known before the 2017 edition as the IPC Alpine Skiing World Championships, along with the Winter Paralympic Games, are the most prestigious level of international competition in Paralympic alpine skiing. First held in 1974, the World Championships have been held every four years (even-numbered non-Paralympic years) from 198? to 2004; beginning in 2009, they have been held every other year, in odd-numbered years.

Paralympic Games major international sport event for people with disabilities

The Paralympics is a major international multi-sport event involving athletes with a range of disabilities, including impaired muscle power, impaired passive range of movement, limb deficiency, leg length difference, short stature, hypertonia, ataxia, athetosis, vision impairment and intellectual impairment. There are Winter and Summer Paralympic Games, which since the 1988 Summer Games in Seoul, South Korea, are held almost immediately following the respective Olympic Games. All Paralympic Games are governed by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC).

Contents

The change from holding the World Championships every four years to every two was originally set to happen in 2007. The 2007 edition was slated for Klosters, Switzerland, but organizers withdrew their bid in early 2006, citing a lack of funding. The International Paralympic Committee initially attempted to find a replacement host for the 2007 Championships but in April decided to cancel the event entirely.

Klosters Place in Grisons, Switzerland

Klosters is a Swiss village in the Prättigau, politically part of the municipality of Klosters-Serneus, which belongs to the political district Prättigau/Davos in the canton of Graubünden. Klosters itself consists of the two main parts Klosters Dorf ('Village') and Kloster Platz ('Place'), and the settlements Selfranga, Äuja, Monbiel. Together with neighbouring Serneus, the two villages form the former municipality of Klosters-Serneus. On 1 January 2016 the former municipality of Saas im Prättigau merged into Klosters-Serneus.

Switzerland federal republic in Western Europe

Switzerland, officially the Swiss Confederation, is a country situated in western, central and southern Europe. It consists of 26 cantons, and the city of Bern is the seat of the federal authorities. The sovereign state is a federal republic bordered by Italy to the south, France to the west, Germany to the north, and Austria and Liechtenstein to the east. Switzerland is a landlocked country geographically divided between the Alps, the Swiss Plateau and the Jura, spanning a total area of 41,285 km2 (15,940 sq mi). While the Alps occupy the greater part of the territory, the Swiss population of approximately 8.5 million people is concentrated mostly on the plateau, where the largest cities are to be found: among them are the two global cities and economic centres Zürich and Geneva.

International Paralympic Committee global governing body for the paralympic movement

The International Paralympic Committee is an international non-profit organisation and the global governing body for the Paralympic Movement. The IPC organizes the Paralympic Games and functions as the international federation for nine sports. Founded on 22 September 1989 in Düsseldorf, Germany, its mission is "To enable Paralympic athletes to achieve sporting excellence and inspire and excite the world". Furthermore, the IPC wants to promote the Paralympic values and to create sport opportunities for all persons with a disability, from beginner to elite level.

On 30 November 2016, the IPC, which serves as the international governing body for Alpine skiing involving competitors with disabilities, adopted the "World Para" branding for the committees that govern all disability sports for which it serves as the international federation. Accordingly, IPC world championship events in Alpine skiing have since been known as "World Para Alpine Skiing Championships". [1]

Hosts

YearPlaceCountryEventNotes
1972 Courchevel Flag of France.svg  France World Winter Gamesnot an official World Championships
1974 Le Grand-Bornand Flag of France.svg  France Skiing World Championships1st, featured alpine (downhill) and Nordic (cross-country) skiing, [2] [3] held by the International Sports Organisation for Disabled (ISOD) [4] [5]
1978Flag placeholder.svg [[|]] [6]
1982 Alpes Vaudoise Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 1982 Disabled Alpine World Championships [4] [7]
1986 Sälen Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 1986 World Disabled Ski Championships [5] 3rd
1990 Winter Park, Colorado Flag of the United States.svg  USA 1990 Disabled Alpine World Championships [5] [8]
1996 Lech Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 1996 Disabled Alpine World Championships [5]
2000 Anzère Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 2000 World Ski Championships for Disabled 6th [9] first time the world championships for alpine and Nordic skiing were held at the same time and hosted by the same Organizing Committee, 23 nations, 500+ athletes [10] [11] [12]
2004 Wildschönau Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 2004 IPC Alpine Skiing World Championships
2007 Klosters Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland Cancelled
2009[Pyeongchang]]Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea 2009 IPC Alpine Skiing World Championships
2011 Sestriere Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 2011 IPC Alpine Skiing World Championships
2013 La Molina Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 2013 IPC Alpine Skiing World Championships [13]
2015 Panorama Mountain Village Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 2015 IPC Alpine Skiing World Championships [14]
2017 Tarvisio Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 2017 World Para Alpine Skiing Championships [15]
2019 Sella Nevea/Kranjska Gora Flag of Italy.svg  Italy/Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia 2019 World Para Alpine Skiing Championships [16]

See also

Related Research Articles

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The World Para Alpine Skiing World Cup previously called the IPC Alpine Skiing World Cup is an annual circuit of elite disabled alpine skiing competitions, regulated by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) and the International Ski Federation (FIS).

Paralympic sports

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Winter Paralympic Games international multi-sport event where athletes with physical disabilities compete in snow & ice sports

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The World Para Nordic Skiing Championships, known before 30 November 2016 as the IPC Biathlon and Cross-Country Skiing World Championships, along with the Winter Paralympic Games, are the most prestigious level of international competition in Paralympic nordic skiing.

Para-snowboarding classification competition classification for Paralympic snowboarding

Para-snowboarding classification is the classification system for para-snowboarding. The sport originally called Adaptive Snowboard is now practiced by hundreds of athletes around the world. The International Paralympic Committee (IPC) defines three classes: SB-LL for athletes with a physical impairment affecting one or both legs, and SB-UL for athletes with a physical impairment affecting one or both arms who compete standing. The sport made its official Winter Paralympic debut in the 2014 Winter Paralympics in Sochi, Russia.

LW12 is a para-Alpine and para-Nordic sit skiing sport class defined by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC). An LW12 skier needs to meet a minimum of one of several conditions including a single below knee but above ankle amputation, monoplegia that exhibits similar to below knee amputation, legs of different length where there is at least a 7 centimetres difference, combined muscle strength in the lower extremities less than 71. For international competitions, classification is done through IPC Alpine Skiing or IPC Nordic Skiing. For sub-international competitions, classification is done by a national federation such as Alpine Canada. For para-Alpine, this class is subdivided into two subclasses.: LW12.1 and LW12.2. A new sit-skier competitor with only national classification will compete as LW12.2 in international competitions until they have been internationally classified.

LW11

LW11 is a para-Alpine and para-Nordic sit skiing sport class, a classification defined by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC for people with paralysis in the lower extremities and people with cerebral palsy that affects the lower half of the body. Outside of skiing, the competitor in this class is unable to walk. For international competitions, classification is done through IPC Alpine Skiing or IPC Nordic Skiing. For sub-international competitions, classification is done by a national federation such as Alpine Canada.

LW10 sit-skiing classification for disabled skiers

LW10 is a para-Alpine and para-Nordic sit-skiing classification for skiers who cannot sit up without support. For international skiing competitions, classification is conducted by International Paralympic Committee (IPC) Alpine Skiing and IPC Nordic Skiing, while national federations such as Alpine Canada handle classification for domestic competitions.

LW1 (classification)

LW1 is a para-Alpine standing skiing classification for people with severe lower extreme disabilities in both extremities. It includes both skiers with amputations and cerebral palsy. International classification is done through International Paralympic Committee Alpine Skiing, and national classification through local national sport federations. LW1 classified skiers use outriggers, and two skis or one ski with a prosthesis. Other equipment is used during training such as ski-tips, ski-bras, and short skis.

LW2 (classification)

LW2 is a para-Alpine and para-Nordic standing ski sport class defined by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC). Competitors in this class have severe disability in a lower limb, which may be a result of an amputation, or arthrodesis in the leg and hip. Depending on the type of skiing, the international classification process for LW2 skiers is handled by the IPC Alpine Skiing Technical Committee and IPC Nordic Skiing Technical Committee. National sport federations handle classification on the lower levels.

LW3 is a para-Alpine and para-Nordic standing skiing sport class defined by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) for skiers with a disability affecting both legs, with double below knee amputation or a combined strength total for both legs of 60, with 80 as the baseline for people without disabilities. For international skiing competitions, classification is done through IPC Alpine Skiing or IPC Nordic Skiing. The classification has two subclasses for para-Alpine skiing: LW3.1 which is for people with double below the knee amputations or similar disabilities, and LW3.2 which is for people with cerebral palsy that involves moderate athetoid, moderate ataxic impairment or slight diplegic involvement.

LW4 is a para-Alpine and para-Nordic standing skiing sport class defined by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) for skiers who may have a disability in one lower extremity, which may be a result of a leg amputation below the knee, knee arthrodesis or a hip arthrodesis. For international skiing competitions, classification is done through IPC Alpine Skiing or IPC Nordic Skiing. A national federation such as Alpine Canada handles classification for domestic competitions.

LW5/7 is a standing para-Alpine and para-Nordic skiing classification for skiers with upper extremity issues in both limbs that may include double amputation of both arms and hands or dysmelia of the upper limbs. The class has three subclasses defined by the location of the disability on the upper extremities. International classification is done by IPC Alpine Skiing and IPC Nordic Skiing. On the national level, classification is handled by national sports federation such as Cross-Country Canada.

LW6/8

LW6/8 is a para-Alpine and para-Nordic standing skiing sport class, a classification defined by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) for people with an upper extremity issue who have paralysis, motor paresis affecting one arm, a single upper arm amputation or CP8 classified cerebral palsy. LW6/8 skiers use two skis and one pole in both para-Alpine and para-Nordic skiing.

LW9 is a para-Alpine and para-Nordic standing skiing sport class, a classification defined by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) for people with upper and lower limb function problems, and includes cerebral palsy skiers classified CP5, CP6 and CP7, along with people with hemiplegia or amputations. For international skiing competitions, classification is done through IPC Alpine Skiing or IPC Nordic Skiing. A national federation such as Alpine Canada handles classification for domestic competitions. This classification is separated into two subclasses including LW9.1 and LW9.2.

Mitchell Gourley Australian Paralympic alpine skier

Mitchell Gourley is an Australian Paralympic alpine skier who competed for Australia in the downhill, super-G, giant slalom, slalom and super combined events at the 2010 Winter Paralympics in Vancouver and 2014 Winter Paralympics in Sochi, but did not win a medal. At the 2017 IPC Alpine Skiing World Championships in Tarvisio, Italy he won the gold medal in the Men's Super Combined Standing. He was Australian team co-captain at the 2018 Winter Paralympics.

References

  1. "The IPC to rebrand the 10 sports it acts as International Federation for" (Press release). International Paralympic Committee. 30 November 2016. Retrieved 13 December 2016.
  2. Athens Education Material - Paralympic Games - From 1960 to 2004, Malaysian Paralympic Council
  3. Winter Paralympic History, HockeyCanada.ca
  4. 1 2 Paralympic Winter Sports Programme Build-up Archived 2010-07-07 at the Wayback Machine , The Paralympian 1/2002, International Paralympic Committee (IPC)
  5. 1 2 3 4 History of the New Zealand Disabled Ski Team, disabledsnowsports.org.nz
  6. Blind Skier Gets His Kicks On The Slopes., The Leader-Post - Apr 12, 1977
  7. Canadian disabled team shines at winter games, The Vancouver Sun - Mar 15, 1982]
  8. Record-Journal - Apr 14, 1989, Google News Archive Search
  9. Winter Sports Celebrate New World Champions, The Paralympian 2/2000, International Paralympic Committee (IPC)
  10. 6th World Ski Championships for the Disabled, amputee-online.com
  11. Results Alpine Skiing (Anzère), International Paralympic Committee (IPC), (archived, Wayback Machine)
  12. Disabled 2000 The Will to Win [ dead link ], highbeam.com, Ski - November 1, 1999
  13. Panorama 2015
  14. "Sella Nevea/Kranjska Gora - 2019 World Para Alpine Skiing Championships".