World Orienteering Championships

Last updated
World Orienteering Championships
Statusactive
Genresporting event
Date(s)July–August
Frequencyannual
Location(s)various
Inaugurated 1966
Previous event 2019
Next event 2020
Organised by IOF

The World Orienteering Championships (or WOC for short) is an annual orienteering event organized by the International Orienteering Federation. The first World Championships was held in Fiskars, Finland in 1966. They were held biennially up to 2003 (with the exception of 1978 and 1979). Since 2003, competitions have been held annually. Participating nations have to be members of the International Orienteering Federation (IOF).

Foot orienteering

Foot orienteering is the oldest formal orienteering sport, and the one with the most "starts" per year. Usually, a FootO is a timed race in which participants start at staggered intervals, are individually timed, and are expected to perform all navigation on their own. The control points are shown on the orienteering map and must be visited in the specified order. Standings are determined first by successful completion of the course, then by shortest time on course.

International Orienteering Federation sports governing body

The International Orienteering Federation (IOF) is the international governing body of the sport of orienteering. The IOF head office is located in Karlstad, Sweden.

Fiskars Oyj Abp is a Finnish consumer goods company founded in 1649 in Fiskars, a locality now in the town of Raseborg, Finland, about 100 kilometres (62 mi) west of Helsinki. Fiskars' global headquarters are located in the Arabianranta district of Helsinki.

Contents

Originally, there were only two competitions: an individual race and a relay. In 1991, a short distance race (roughly 20–25 minutes) was added and a sprint race was added in 2001. The middle distance (roughly 30–35 minutes) replaced the short distance in 2003. In 2014, a sprint relay was added with two men and two women participating and with starting order woman-man-man-woman.

History

The IOF was founded on 21 May 1961 at a Congress held in Copenhagen, Denmark by the orienteering national federations of Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, the Federal Republic of Germany, the German Democratic Republic, Finland, Hungary, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland. [1] Their main goal was to standardize the sport and streamline international competition rules. A group of people work with these tasks, and at the 1963 IOF Congress, the work was approved and a technical committee was created. This led to the first international orienteering competition; the 1962 European Championships in Løten, Norway. The first European Orienteering Championships (EOC) consisted of only one competition; individual. In the following EOC, in Le Brassus, Switzerland, the relay event was added to the competition program. These two EOCs are considered forerunners to the first World Orienteering Championships in 1966.

Denmark Constitutional monarchy in Europe

Denmark, officially the Kingdom of Denmark, is a sovereign state in Northern Europe. Denmark proper consists of a peninsula, Jutland, and an archipelago of 443 named islands, with the largest being Zealand, Funen and the North Jutlandic Island. The islands are characterised by flat, arable land and sandy coasts, low elevation and a temperate climate. The southernmost of the Scandinavian nations, Denmark lies southwest of Sweden and south of Norway, and is bordered to the south by Germany. The Kingdom of Denmark also comprises two autonomous constituent countries in the North Atlantic Ocean: the Faroe Islands and Greenland. Denmark has a total area of 42,924 km2 (16,573 sq mi), land area of 42,394 km2 (16,368 sq mi), and the total area including Greenland and the Faroe Islands is 2,210,579 km2 (853,509 sq mi), and a population of 5.8 million.

The Finnish Orienteering Federation is the governing body for the sport of orienteering in Finland. The federation was founded in 1945 and has approximately 60,000 members.

Swiss Orienteering is the national Orienteering Association in Switzerland. It is recognized as the orienteering association for Switzerland by the International Orienteering Federation, of which it is a member.

Change of concept

Starting from 2019, the World Orienteering Championships will be split into two events: Urban WOC in even-numbered years (consisting of sprint events only) and Forest WOC in odd-numbered years (consisting of forest events only).

Format

The competition format has changed several times. From the beginning in 1966, the World Championships consisted of only two competitions: an individual race and a relay. In 1991, a short distance race (roughly 20–25 minutes) was added and a sprint race was added in 2001. The middle distance (roughly 30–35 minutes) replaced the short distance in 2003. On IOF's 23rd congress in Lausanne in 2012, it was decided that a sprint relay event would be added in the 2014 World Championships in Italy. [2] The sprint relay is competed in urban areas and consists of four-orienteer mixed-gender teams with starting order woman-man-man-woman.

Lausanne Capital city of the canton of Vaud, Switzerland

Lausanne is the capital city and biggest town of the canton of Vaud in Romandy, Switzerland. A municipality, it is situated on the shores of Lake Geneva. It faces the French town of Évian-les-Bains, with the Jura Mountains to its north-west. Lausanne is located 62 kilometres northeast of Geneva.

2014 World Orienteering Championships 2014 edition of the World Orienteering Championships

The 31st World Orienteering Championships was held in the Trentino and Veneto regions of Italy, from 5 to 12 July 2014. It was the first time that Mixed Sprint Relay is a part of the program at a World Championships.

Current competition format

The current championship events are:

Forest WOC (odd years)
DistanceWinning TimeNotes
Long distance90–100 minPreviously called classic distance
Middle distance30–35 minReplaced short distance (20–25 min) in 2003
Relay3 × 40 minThree-person teams
Urban WOC (even years)
DistanceWinning TimeNotes
Sprint12–15 min
Knock-out sprint5–8 minFirst held in 2020
Sprint relay4 × 12–15 minFour-person teams, two men and two women.

Event timeline

World Orienteering Championships

Venues

YearDatesLocation [3]
1966 1–2 October Flag of Finland.svg Fiskars, Finland [4]
1968 28–29 September Flag of Sweden.svg Linköping, Sweden [5]
1970 27–29 September Flag of East Germany.svg Friedrichroda, German Democratic Republic [6]
1972 14–16 September Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Staré Splavy, Czechoslovakia [7]
1974 20–22 September Flag of Denmark.svg Viborg, Denmark [8]
1976 24–26 September Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Aviemore, United Kingdom [9]
1978 15–17 September Flag of Norway.svg Kongsberg, Norway [10]
1979 2–4 September Flag of Finland.svg Tampere, Finland [11]
1981 4–6 September Flag of Switzerland.svg Thun, Switzerland [12]
1983 1–4 September Flag of Hungary.svg Zalaegerszeg, Hungary [13]
1985 4–6 September Flag of Australia (converted).svg Bendigo, Australia [14]
1987 3–5 September Flag of France.svg Gérardmer, France [15]
1989 17–20 August Flag of Sweden.svg Skövde, Sweden [16]
1991 21–25 August Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Mariánské Lázně, Czechoslovakia [17]
1993 9–14 October Flag of the United States.svg West Point, United States [18]
1995 15–20 August Flag of Germany.svg Detmold, Germany [19]
1997 11–16 August Flag of Norway.svg Grimstad, Norway [20]
1999 1–8 August Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Inverness, United Kingdom [21]
2001 29 July – 4 August Flag of Finland.svg Tampere, Finland [22]
2003 3–9 August Flag of Switzerland.svg Rapperswil/Jona, Switzerland [23]
2004 11–19 September Flag of Sweden.svg Västerås, Sweden [24]
2005 9–15 August Flag of Japan.svg Aichi, Japan [25]
2006 1–5 August Flag of Denmark.svg Århus, Denmark [26]
2007 18–26 August Flag of Ukraine.svg Kiev, Ukraine [27]
2008 10–20 July Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Olomouc, Czech Republic [28]
2009 16–23 August Flag of Hungary.svg Miskolc, Hungary [29]
2010 8–15 August Flag of Norway.svg Trondheim, Norway [30]
2011 13–20 August Flag of France.svg Savoie, France [31]
2012 14–22 July Flag of Switzerland.svg Lausanne, Switzerland [32]
2013 6–14 July Flag of Finland.svg Vuokatti, Finland [33]
2014 5–13 July Flag of Italy.svg Trentino-Veneto, Italy [34]
2015 1–7 August Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Inverness, United Kingdom [35]
2016 20–28 August Flag of Sweden.svg Strömstad-Tanum, Sweden [36]
2017 1–7 July Flag of Estonia.svg Tartu, Estonia [37]
2018 4–11 August Flag of Latvia.svg Riga, Latvia [38]
2019 13–17 August Flag of Norway.svg Østfold, Norway
2020 7–11 July Flag of Denmark.svg Triangle Region, Denmark
2021 4–9 July Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Doksy, Czech Republic
2022 9–13 July Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Edinburgh, United Kingdom
2023 mid-July Flag of Switzerland.svg Graubünden, Switzerland [39]
2024 TBATBA
2025 early to mid-July Flag of Finland.svg Kuopio, Finland [39]

Multiple winners

Men

Boldface denotes active athletes and highest medal count among all athletes (including these who not included in these tables) per type.

RankAthleteFromToGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 Flag of France.svg Thierry Gueorgiou 20032017145423
2 Flag of Norway.svg Olav Lundanes 20102019104317
3 Flag of Switzerland.svg Daniel Hubmann 20052019811928
4 Flag of Norway.svg Øyvin Thon 197919897108
5 Flag of Russia.svg Andrey Khramov 2005201563312
6 Flag of Norway.svg Petter Thoresen 198919975128
7 Flag of Russia.svg Valentin Novikov 2004201345211
8 Flag of Switzerland.svg Matthias Kyburz 201220184408
9 Flag of Norway.svg Bjørnar Valstad 1991200443310
10 Flag of Norway.svg Tore Sagvolden 197919874318
11 Flag of Sweden.svg Rolf Pettersson 197219794206
12 Flag of Sweden.svg Jonas Leandersson 201220184037
13 Flag of Norway.svg Morten Berglia 198119874015
Flag of Norway.svg Jørgen Rostrup 199920054015
15 Flag of Switzerland.svg Thomas Bührer 199120034004
16 Flag of Norway.svg Magne Dæhli 201220193216
17 Flag of Norway.svg Egil Johansen 197619793205
18 Flag of Sweden.svg Emil Wingstedt 200320073137
19 Flag of Sweden.svg Bernt Frilén 197019743115
20 Flag of Denmark.svg Søren Bobach 201420163104
21 Flag of Norway.svg Åge Hadler 196619723036
22 Flag of Switzerland.svg Christian Aebersold 199119953003
Flag of Sweden.svg Arne Johansson 197219763003
Flag of Sweden.svg Karl Johansson 196619703003
Flag of Norway.svg Eskil Kinneberg 201720183003
26 Flag of Sweden.svg Jörgen Mårtensson 1981199726210
27 Flag of Finland.svg Jani Lakanen 199920132518
28 Flag of Finland.svg Janne Salmi 199520012417
29 Flag of Norway.svg Carl Godager Kaas 201020162406
30 Flag of Switzerland.svg Matthias Merz 200520122349
31 Flag of Sweden.svg Gustav Bergman 201220192248

Women

Boldface denotes active athletes and highest medal count among all athletes (including these who not included in these tables) per type.

RankAthleteFromToGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 Flag of Switzerland.svg Simone Niggli-Luder 20012013232631
2 Flag of Sweden.svg Tove Alexandersson 20112019108321
3 Flag of Finland.svg Minna Kauppi 2004201395317
4 Flag of Denmark.svg Maja Alm 2012201877216
5 Flag of Sweden.svg Marita Skogum 1983199363110
6 Flag of Sweden.svg Annichen Kringstad 198119856006
7 Flag of Switzerland.svg Judith Wyder 2011201853412
8 Flag of Sweden.svg Helena Bergman 2012201846818
9 Flag of Norway.svg Hanne Staff 1997200444412
10 Flag of Finland.svg Liisa Veijalainen 197219814408
11 Flag of Sweden.svg Karin Rabe 197819894329
12 Flag of Sweden.svg Arja Hannus 198119914105
13 Flag of Norway.svg Anne Margrethe Hausken 2005201635311
14 Flag of Sweden.svg Annika Billstam 2007201533814
15 Flag of Finland.svg Heli Jukkola 200320073328
16 Flag of Sweden.svg Ulla Lindkvist 196619723306
17 Flag of Finland.svg Merja Rantanen 200820173148
18 Flag of Switzerland.svg Vroni König-Salmi 199720083137
19 Flag of Sweden.svg Marlena Jansson 199119993126
20 Flag of Sweden.svg Anna Bogren 199319973115
21 Flag of Sweden.svg Karolina A. Højsgaard 200320092518
22 Flag of Denmark.svg Ida Bobach 201120162406
23 Flag of Russia.svg Natalia Gemperle 2016201923510
24 Flag of Sweden.svg Kristin Cullman 197419782305
25 Flag of Sweden.svg Gunilla Svärd 199720042226
26 Flag of Finland.svg Outi Borgenström 197419812215
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Dana Brožková 200620112215
Flag of Norway.svg Ingrid Hadler 196619742215
29 Flag of Finland.svg Kirsi Boström (Tiira) 199319992204
Flag of Denmark.svg Emma Klingenberg 201420152204

Mixed

Sprint Relay
YearGoldSilverBronze
2014Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark Flag of Russia.svg  Russia
2015Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Flag of Russia.svg  Russia
2016Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
2017Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
2018Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark

All-time medal table

(Updated after WOC 2018)

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden  (SWE)555456165
2Flag of Norway.svg  Norway  (NOR)484642136
3Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland  (SUI)453337115
4Flag of Finland.svg  Finland  (FIN)24423197
5Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)1471031
6Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark  (DEN)1210628
7Flag of Russia.svg  Russia  (RUS)11121336
8Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic  (CZE)34512
9Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain  (GBR)34411
10Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary  (HUN)3126
11Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia  (TCH)25815
12Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine  (UKR)1348
13Flag of Austria.svg  Austria  (AUT)1102
14Flag of Latvia.svg  Latvia  (LAT)1023
15Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia  (AUS)1001
16Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand  (NZL)0101
17Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union  (URS)0022
18Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus  (BLR)0011
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany  (GER)0011
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy  (ITA)0011
Totals (20 nations)224223225672

See also

Related Research Articles

The Junior World Orienteering Championships are an orienteering competition held every year. They were first held in 1990. Entry is open to national teams aged 20 and below as of 31 December in the year of competition. Representative countries must be members of the International Orienteering Federation (IOF).

Daniel Hubmann Swiss orienteer

Daniel Hubmann is a Swiss orienteering competitor, world champion in all three individual disciplines and multiple winner of the overall Orienteering World Cup. He is the brother of Martin Hubmann.

The European Orienteering Championships were first held in 1962. They have been held biennially since 2000. From 2020, the European Orienteering Championships will be held annually, with sprint events and forest events in alternate years

The World Ski Orienteering Championships (Ski-WOC) is the official event to award the titles of World Champions in ski orienteering. The World Championships is organized every odd year. The programme includes Sprint, Middle and Long Distance competitions, and a Relay for both men and women. The first Ski-WOC was held in 1975.

Magne Dæhli Norwegian orienteer

Magne Dæhli is a Norwegian orienteering competitor, ski-orienteer and cross-country skier. His achievements include five medals in the relay at the World Orienteering Championships, of which three are gold medals. His best individual performances include a silver medal in the long distance from the European Orienteering Championships, and a fourth place in both the middle and long distances from the world championships.

Natalia Efimova orienteer

Natalia Korzhova is a Russian orienteering competitor. She was member of the Russian relay team that received a silver medal in the 2008 European Orienteering Championships, together with Yulia Novikova and Tatiana Ryabkina. She competed at the 2008 World Orienteering Championships in Olomouc, where she qualified for the finals in the sprint and in the long distance.

The Canadian Orienteering Federation (COF), better known as Orienteering Canada, is the governing body of orienteering in Canada. It is recognized by the International Orienteering Federation, of which it is a member.

Maja Alm orienteer

Maja Møller Alm is a Danish orienteering and Athletics competitor who has won seven World Championships and two World Games titles. She is especially known for her four gold medals on the sprint distance, where she has won the title four years in a row: 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018. She is also a medalist from the Junior World Championships. Since 2006 she has been coached by Danish national coach Lars Lindstrøm. Alm is remarkable for her dominant running speed, which gives her a great advantage over other competitors at the sprint distance.

Michal Smola Czech orienteerist

Michal Smola is a Czech orienteering competitor, silver medalist from the world championships, and junior world champion. He became Junior World Champion in the short distance in Nove Mesto na Morave in 2000, and with the Czech team in relay in 2000 and in 2001. His best achievement by September 2009 is silver medal in the middle distance at the 2008 World Orienteering Championship in Olomouc.

Martin Johansson (orienteer, born 1984) Swedish ski orienteer

Martin Johansson is a Swedish orienteering, ski-orienteering and cross-country skiing competitor, medallist from the orienteering world championships, and a 2004 Junior World Champion in relay. He received bronze medals in sprint at the World Orienteering Championships in Kiev in 2007 and in Olomouc in 2008. His brother, Lars, is a member of the Rockford Icehogs

The World Mountain Bike Orienteering Championships is the official event for awarding World Champion titles in mountain bike orienteering. The World Championships, also known as WMTBOC, were first held in 2002, and since 2004 they have been organized annually. The programme includes Long distance, Middle distance, Sprint, and a Relay for both men and women.

Ida Bobach Danish orienteer

Ida Bobach is a Danish orienteering competitor who was Junior World Champion in 2009, and became triple Junior World Champion from 2010, when she won the sprint, long distance and the relay. She represents the club OK Pan Århus, and since 2007, has received training from Danish national coach Lars Lindstrøm. In 2015 she won gold medals at the World Championships in the long and Relay.

Tove Alexandersson Swedish female orienteer and ski orienteer

Tove Alexandersson is a Swedish orienteering, ski-orienteering competitor and sky runner. She is an eight-time world champion in orienteering, an eight-time world champion in ski-orienteering and a one-time world champion in skyrunning. She runs for Stora Tuna OK in orienteering and Alfta-Ösa OK in ski-orienteering.

Matthias Kyburz Swiss orienteer

Matthias Kyburz is a Swiss orienteering competitor, junior world champion, European champion and world champion.

Gustav Bergman (orienteer) Swedish orienteer

Gustav Bergman is a Swedish orienteering competitor. He won a bronze medal in the middle distance at the 2013 World Orienteering Championships.

Julia Jakob, formerly Julia Gross is a Swiss orienteer. She was born in Richterswil and resides in Zürich.

The 2018 Orienteering World Cup was the 24th edition of the Orienteering World Cup. The 2018 Orienteering World Cup consisted of 11 individual events and 9 relay events. The events were located in Switzerland, Latvia, Norway and Czech Republic. The European Orienteering Championships in Ticino, Switzerland and the 2018 World Orienteering Championships in Riga, Latvia were included in the World Cup.

The 2015 Orienteering World Cup was the 21st edition of the Orienteering World Cup. The 2015 Orienteering World Cup consisted of 11 events, all individual competitions. The events were located in Australia, Norway, Sweden, United Kingdom and Switzerland. The 2015 World Orienteering Championships in Inverness, Scotland, United Kingdom was included in the World Cup.

References

  1. "History". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2011-08-02.
  2. "Sprint Relay in the World Orienteering Championships from 2014". International Orienteering Federation. 19 November 2012. Retrieved 7 February 2019.
  3. "World Orienteering Championships". International Orienteering Federation . Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  4. "World Orienteering Championships 1966". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  5. "World Orienteering Championships 1968". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  6. "World Orienteering Championships 1970". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  7. "World Orienteering Championships 1972". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  8. "World Orienteering Championships 1974". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  9. "World Orienteering Championships 1976". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  10. "World Orienteering Championships 1978". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  11. "World Orienteering Championships 1979". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  12. "World Orienteering Championships 1981". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  13. "World Orienteering Championships 1983". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  14. "World Orienteering Championships 1985". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  15. "World Orienteering Championships 1987". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  16. "World Orienteering Championships 1989". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  17. "World Orienteering Championships 1991". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  18. "World Orienteering Championships 1993". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  19. "World Orienteering Championships 1995". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  20. "World Orienteering Championships 1997". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  21. "World Orienteering Championships 1999". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  22. "World Orienteering Championships 2001". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  23. "World Orienteering Championships 2003". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  24. "World Orienteering Championships 2004". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  25. "World Orienteering Championships 2005". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  26. "World Orienteering Championships 2006". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  27. "World Orienteering Championships 2007". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  28. "World Orienteering Championships 2008". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  29. "World Orienteering Championships 2009". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  30. "World Orienteering Championships 2010". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  31. "World Orienteering Championships 2011". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  32. "World Orienteering Championships 2012". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  33. "World Orienteering Championships 2013". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  34. "World Orienteering Championships 2014". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  35. "World Orienteering Championships 2015". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  36. "World Orienteering Championships 2016". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  37. "World Orienteering Championships 2017". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  38. "World Orienteering Championships 2018". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  39. 1 2 "World Orienteering Championships 2023 awarded to Switzerland and WOC 2025 to Finland". International Orienteering Federation. 2019-08-08.
WOC