International Orienteering Federation

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International Orienteering Federation
IOF logo.png
International Orienteering Federation members.png
Map of the members of the IOF according to their region.
AbbreviationIOF
FormationMay 21, 1961;59 years ago (1961-05-21)
Type Federation of national sports associations
HeadquartersDrottninggatan 47 3-1/2 tr
Karlstad
Sweden
Region served
Worldwide
Membership
76 national federations
President
Leho Haldna
Secretary General
Tom Hollowell
Affiliations International Olympic Committee
Website www.orienteering.org

The International Orienteering Federation (IOF) is the international governing body of the sport of orienteering. The IOF head office is located in Karlstad, Sweden. [1]

Contents

The IOF governs four orienteering disciplines: foot orienteering, mountain bike orienteering, ski orienteering, and trail orienteering. [2]

History

The IOF was founded on 21 May 1961 at a Congress held in Copenhagen, Denmark by the orienteering national federations of Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, the Federal Republic of Germany, the German Democratic Republic, Finland, Hungary, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland. [3] By 1969, the IOF represented 16 countries, including its first two non-European member federations representing Japan and Canada, [4] and in 1977 the IOF was recognised by the International Olympic Committee. [3]

Membership

As of January 2016, the membership of the IOF comprises 80 national orienteering federations, of which 56 are members, 24 are provisional members, [5] divided into six geographical regions. [6]

Africa

6 Members, 1 Provisional Member

Asia

17 Members, 1 Provisional Member

Europe

40 Members

North America

5 Members

Oceania

2 Members

South America

9 Members

Governance structure

The IOF is governed by an elected Council consisting of a President, a Senior Vice President, two Vice Presidents, and seven other Council members. [8] Day-to-day operations of the IOF are the responsibility of the IOF Secretary General. [1] Several standing commissions of the IOF are responsible for the development of the sport worldwide. These commissions include: Foot Orienteering, MTB Orienteering, Ski Orienteering, Trail Orienteering, Environment, IT, Map, Medical, and Rules.

Presidents [9] [10]

Affiliations

Since 1977, the IOF has been recognised by the International Olympic Committee. [3]

The IOF is also a member of the following organisations: [3]

Publications

The IOF publishes a wide variety of journals and reference works related to the sport. These include Orienteering World, an annual magazine, The Scientific Journal of Orienteering, the OZine, [11] and official editions of the rules of IOF sanctioned orienteering [12] and specifications for orienteering maps. [13]

Related Research Articles

Orienteering Group of sports that requires navigational skills

Orienteering is a group of sports that require navigational skills using a map and compass to navigate from point to point in diverse and usually unfamiliar terrain whilst moving at speed. Participants are given a topographical map, usually a specially prepared orienteering map, which they use to find control points. Originally a training exercise in land navigation for military officers, orienteering has developed many variations. Among these, the oldest and the most popular is foot orienteering. For the purposes of this article, foot orienteering serves as a point of departure for discussion of all other variations, but almost any sport that involves racing against a clock and requires navigation with a map is a type of orienteering.

The World Orienteering Championships is an annual orienteering event organized by the International Orienteering Federation. The first World Championships was held in Fiskars, Finland in 1966. They were held biennially up to 2003. Since 2003, competitions have been held annually. Participating nations have to be members of the International Orienteering Federation (IOF).

Hilde Gjermundshaug Pedersen is a Norwegian cross-country skier. Her first Olympic medal was a silver 4 × 5 km relay at the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City. At the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, she took the bronze medal in the 10 km classical interval start event. Pedersen is the oldest woman ever to win a cross country skiing World Cup race, which she did at age 41 in January 2006 in Otepää, Estonia.

Sinikka Kukkonen is a Finnish orienteering competitor. She is World Champion in both orienteering and ski orienteering. She became the first World Champion in ski orienteering, in 1975.

British Orienteering Federation

The British Orienteering Federation Limited, generally known and branded as British Orienteering, is the national sports governing body for the sport of orienteering in the United Kingdom.

Ski orienteering winter sport combining the events of cross-country skiing and orienteering

Ski orienteering (SkiO) is a cross-country skiing endurance winter racing sport and one of the four orienteering disciplines recognized by the IOF. A successful ski orienteer combines high physical endurance, strength and excellent technical skiing skills with the ability to navigate and make the best route choices while skiing at a high speed.

The World Ski Orienteering Championships (Ski-WOC) is the official event to award the titles of World Champions in ski orienteering. The World Championships is organized every odd year. The programme includes Sprint, Middle and Long Distance competitions, and a Relay for both men and women. The first Ski-WOC was held in 1975.

Trail orienteering type of orienteering

Trail orienteering (TrailO) is an orienteering sport that involves precise reading of an orienteering map and the corresponding terrain. Trail orienteers must identify, in the terrain and in the presence of decoys, control points shown on the map. TrailO involves navigation skills but unlike most other forms of orienteering, it involves no point to point racing and little or no route choice. It is conducted usually on trails and because the objective is accuracy, not the speed of physical movement, the sport is accessible to physically disabled competitors on equal terms as able-bodied.

Orienteering Australia is the National organisation responsible for the governing, organisation and promotion of orienteering in Australia. It is a Full Member of the International Orienteering Federation. Orienteering Australia has its own publication The Australian Orienteer.

Belarus Orienteering Federation

Belarus Orienteering Federation is the National organisation responsible for the governing, organisation and promotion of orienteering in Belarus. It is a full member of the International Orienteering Federation.

The Danish Orienteering Federation is the national Orienteering Association in Denmark. It is recognized as the orienteering association for Denmark by the International Orienteering Federation, of which it is a member.

Martin Johansson (orienteer, born 1984) Swedish ski orienteer

Martin Johansson is a Swedish orienteering, ski-orienteering and cross-country skiing competitor, medallist from the orienteering world championships, and a 2004 Junior World Champion in relay. He received bronze medals in sprint at the World Orienteering Championships in Kiev in 2007 and in Olomouc in 2008. His brother, Lars, is a member of the Rockford Icehogs

The history of orienteering begins in the late 19th century in Sweden, where it originated as military training. The actual term "orienteering" was first used in 1886 at the Swedish Military Academy Karlberg and meant the crossing of unknown land with the aid of a map and a compass. The competitive sport began when the first competition was held for Swedish military officers on 28 May 1893 at the yearly games of the Stockholm garrison. The first civilian competition, in Norway on 31 October 1897, was sponsored by the Tjalve Sports Club and held near Oslo. The course was long by modern standards, at 19.5 km, on which only three controls were placed. The competition was won by Peder Fossum in a time of 1 hour, 47 minutes, and 7 seconds.

Control point (orienteering)

A control point is a marked waypoint used in orienteering and related sports such as rogaining and adventure racing. It is located in the competition area; marked both on an orienteering map and in the terrain, and described on a control description sheet. The control point must be identifiable on the map and on the ground. A control point has three components: a high visibility item, known as a flag or kite; an identifier, known as a control code; and a recording mechanism for contestants to record proof that they visited the control point. The control point is usually temporary, except on a permanent orienteering course.

The Norwegian Orienteering Federation is the national Orienteering Association in Norway. It is recognized as the orienteering association for Norway by the International Orienteering Federation, of which it is a member. The association was founded 1 October 1945, and is a member of the Norwegian Confederation of Sports (NIF). Its first chairman was Kaare Thuesen. In 1946 NOF had 204 associated clubs, with just above 7,000 members. The number of clubs and associated members increased gradually through the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, and peaked in 1984 with 630 clubs and 34,000 members, and 35,000 members and 620 clubs in 1985. The next twenty years saw a decline in the number of clubs and members. As per December 2007 Norges Orienteringsforbund had 400 associated clubs and just above 24,000 members, distributed over eighteen districts.

Foot orienteering Timed race in which participants start at staggered intervals

Foot orienteering is the oldest formal orienteering sport, and the one with the most "starts" per year. Usually, a FootO is a timed race in which participants start at staggered intervals, are individually timed, and are expected to perform all navigation on their own. The control points are shown on the orienteering map and must be visited in the specified order. Standings are determined first by successful completion of the course, then by shortest time on course.

New Zealand Orienteering Federation is the national Orienteering Association in New Zealand. It is recognized as the orienteering association for New Zealand by the International Orienteering Federation, of which it is a member.

Tove Alexandersson Swedish female orienteer and ski orienteer

Tove Alexandersson is a Swedish orienteering, ski-orienteering competitor and sky runner. She is an ten-time world champion in orienteering, an ten-time world champion in ski-orienteering and a one-time world champion in skyrunning. She runs for Stora Tuna OK in orienteering and Alfta-Ösa OK in ski-orienteering.

International Rogaining Federation organization

International Rogaining Federation (IRF) is the peak international body for the sport of rogaining. The aims of the IRF are to promote rogaining worldwide, maintain the culture and the rules of the sport.

References

  1. 1 2 "Secretariat". International Orienteering Federation. Archived from the original on 2011-06-26. Retrieved 2011-08-02.
  2. "About the IOF". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2011-08-02.
  3. 1 2 3 4 "History". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2011-08-02.
  4. Dandenong Ranges Orienteering Club. "Orienteering History". Momentech Software Services. Archived from the original on 2006-01-08. Retrieved 2006-02-19.
  5. "National Federations". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2011-08-02.
  6. "Regions". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2011-08-02.
  7. "lof.lv". Archived from the original on 2010-04-20. Retrieved 2013-05-13.
  8. "Council". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2011-08-02.
  9. "Past and present Councils". IOF. Retrieved 2013-12-23.
  10. "Leho Haldna from Estonia is the new IOF President". IOF. Retrieved 2017-08-04.
  11. "Publications". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2011-08-02.
  12. "Rules". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2011-08-02.
  13. "Mapping". International Orienteering Federation. Archived from the original on 2011-08-17. Retrieved 2011-08-02.