World Association of Kickboxing Organizations

Last updated
World Association of Kickboxing Organizations
Wako.jpg
WAKO amateur logo
AbbreviationWAKO
Formation1976
Type Federation of national associations
Legal statusActive (as per Swiss Law as founded in Zurich on February 6, 1988)
PurposeGlobal Development and governance of the sport of Kickboxing
Headquarters Italy
Location
Region served
Worldwide
Membership
National association[ clarification needed ]
Official language
English
Affiliations SportAccord
WADA International World Games Association
Website www.wakoweb.com/en/
RemarksWAKO was established as "World All Style Karate Organization".

The World Association of Kickboxing Organizations (W.A.K.O or WAKO) is an international organization of kickboxing. The governing body of amateur kickboxing certified by WAKO is created to develop support and govern at an amateur level In addition to holding world championship events, WAKO sanctions the champions of kickboxing. WAKO is the only organisation worldwide that is recognised by the GAISF (Global Association of Sports Federations) and the IOC (International Olympic Committee).

Contents

History

WAKO originated in Europe in 1976 [1] and formulated the rules and regulations for the new fighting sport de facto, acting as the Kickboxing Federations of the World. It was founded by American Kickboxing promoter Mike Anderson, and his friend, German Kickboxing promoter Georg Brueckner. WAKO's rules are based on democratic principles and are forming the governing body of the sport that is officially registered in Zurich, Switzerland. WAKO is the largest unified kickboxing organization in the world.[ citation needed ] In 2006 the International Amateur Kickboxing Sports Association (I.A.K.S.A) and WAKO merged under the umbrella of WAKO, making its acceptance possible by the General Association of International Sports Federations (G.A.I.S.F) as the governing body for the sport of Kickboxing. [2] WAKO offers 7 different styles: Points Fighting, light-contact, full-contact, kick-light, low-kick, K1-style, and musical forms. Today WAKO can count on 126 affiliated nations in the five continents, with 95 officially recognized by their respective Sports or Olympic Council.[ citation needed ]

WAKO is a member of Sport Accord and is officially recognized as the official Kickboxing governing body by Sport Accord, Olympic Council of Asia, WADA and the International World Games Association. Kickboxing is included in World Combat Games, Asian Indoor Games, and the Martial Arts Games (promoted by OCA) in the 2017 International World Games. WAKO has five continental divisions functioning under the auspices of the WAKO International Federation which are WAKO Europe, WAKO Pan America, WAKO Asia, WAKO Oceania and WAKO Africa.

Styles

WAKO supports 7 different styles: four of them are on the tatami and three of them are in the ring, [3]

Tatami Sports

Musical form

A musical form is a staged or imaginary fight against one or more opponents in which the performer uses techniques from Oriental Martial Arts to personally selected music.

Point Fighting

Also known as semi-contact. Point fighting is a discipline where two contestants fight with the primary goal of scoring defined points and using controlled legal techniques without using full force.

  • Opponents are allowed to hit each other with punches and kicks. striking above the waist.
  • Foot sweeps are allowed.
  • Elbows and knees are forbidden.
  • Clinch fighting and throws are forbidden.

Light Contact

Light Contact in the past was recognised as an intermediate stage between semi contact and full contact Kickboxing. Modern Light Contact has evolved into its own unique style fast and dynamic continuous kickboxing. Unlike Point Fighting, athletes will fight continuously amassing scores over 3x2 minute rounds.

  • Opponents are allowed to hit each other with punches and kicks. striking above the waist and below ankle/mid-calf.
  • Foot sweeps are allowed.
  • Elbows and knees are forbidden.
  • Clinch fighting and throws are forbidden.

Kick-light

Kick-light is an intermediate stage between semi-kick and low-kick kickboxing.

  • Opponents are allowed to hit each other with punches and kicks, striking the thigh (only from outside to inside and vice versa), which can be attacked using the shin.
  • Foot sweeps are allowed.
  • Elbows and knees are forbidden.
  • Clinch fighting and throws forbidden.

Ring sports

Full contact

Full Contact is a discipline of Kickboxing where the intention is to mimic the pressure felt during a real fight.

  • Opponents are allowed to hit each other with punches and kicks, striking above the waist and below the ankle/mid-calf.
  • Foot sweeps are allowed.
  • Elbows and knees are forbidden.
  • Clinch fighting and throws are forbidden.

Low-kick

In low-kick Kickboxing, there is the possibility of attacking the opponent's legs with clean kicks.

  • Opponents are allowed to hit each other with punches and kicks, striking the thigh (only from outside to inside and vice versa) which can be attacked using the shin.
  • Foot sweeps are allowed.
  • Elbows and knees are forbidden.
  • Clinch fighting and throws forbidden.

K1-style

See K-1.

  • Opponents are allowed to hit each other with punches and kicks. Legs and any other part of the body can be attacked using the shin.
  • Foot sweeps are allowed.
  • Elbows on the head are forbidden.
  • Throws are forbidden.
  • Clinching must be less than 5 seconds. Kickboxers are allowed to hold the opponent's neck with both hands in order to attack only with the knee. You are only allowed one knee strike per clinch exchange.

Competitions

WAKO holds a world championship every two years, with youth (18 and under) and adult (18–45) championships in separate years; only national teams are accepted. Each member country can present only one competitor in each weight class. Competitors are commonly the national champion of their weight class in that particular Kickboxing style and many are also officially recognized by their National Olympic Committees or Ministry of Sports.

WAKO Kickboxing was one of thirteen combat sports participating in the first Combat Games being held in Beijing, China under the patronage of the IOC and SportAccord. WAKO participated in the World Combat Games in St. Petersburg, Russia in September 2013, under the patronage of the IOC and SportAccord. There were three styles at the Combat Games: Low Kick, Points Fighting (formally called Semi Contact), and Full Contact.

World Champions

Men's divisions

Style52.7 kg54.5 kg56.4 kg58.2 kg
Low Kick Flag of Italy.svg Gianpietro MarcedduVacant Flag of Poland.svg Michał Królik Flag of Russia.svg Yury Trogiyanov
Full Contact Flag of Italy.svg Ivan Sciolla Flag of Russia.svg Alexey Trifonov Flag of Russia.svg Ilnaz Sayfullin Flag of Germany.svg Johannes Wolf
K1 RulesVacantVacant Flag of France.svg Franck Gross Flag of Russia.svg Astemir Borsov
Style60 kg62.2 kg64.5 kg66.8 kg
Low Kick Flag of Russia.svg Ruslan Tozlyan Flag of Serbia.svg Miloš Anić Flag of Serbia.svg Aleksandar Konovalov Flag of Russia.svg Kenan Gunaydin
Full Contact Flag of France.svg Kamel Bacha Flag of Italy.svg Giuseppe Di Cuia Flag of Russia.svg Sergey Lipinets Flag of France.svg Dieter Leclercq
K1 Rules Flag of Hungary.svg Antoine Habash Flag of Portugal.svg Ruben Almeida Flag of France.svg Eddy Nait Slimani Flag of France.svg Mohamed Galaoui
Style69.1 kg71.8 kg75 kg78.1 kg
Low Kick Flag of Russia.svg Evgeni Grychishkin Flag of Turkey.svg Husnu Sari Flag of Kosovo.svg Shpejtim Ahmetaj Flag of Greece.svg Giannis Sofokleous
Full Contact Flag of France.svg Edouard Bernadou Flag of Slovenia.svg Gregor Stračanek Flag of Germany.svg Artur Reis Flag of Germany.svg Artur Reis
K1 Rules Flag of Italy.svg Georgian Cimpeanu Flag of Bulgaria.svg Atanas Bojilov Flag of Russia.svg Aleksandr Zakharov Flag of Serbia.svg Aleksandar Menković
Style81.4 kg85.1 kg88.6 kg94.1 kg
Low Kick Flag of Serbia.svg Nikola Stošić Flag of Russia.svg Andrei Chechkonin Flag of Serbia.svg Bojan Džepina Flag of Brazil.svg Felipe Micheletti
Full Contact Flag of Germany.svg Viktor Fröhlich Flag of Croatia.svg Bojan Mišković Flag of Norway.svg Robert Paulsbyen Flag of Germany.svg Eugen Waigel
K1 Rules Flag of Serbia.svg Aleksandar Menkovic Flag of Italy.svg Gabriele Casella Flag of France.svg Gregory Grosi Flag of Lithuania.svg Sergej Maslobojev

As of July 14, 2020

Women's divisions

Style50 kg52 kg55 kg59 kg62 kg
Low Kick Flag of Italy.svg Valeria Imbrogno Flag of Spain.svg Eva Maria Naranjo Flag of Poland.svg Iwona NeirodaVacant Flag of Spain.svg Loli Munoz
Full ContactVacantVacant Flag of Hungary.svg Renata Rakoczi Flag of Norway.svg Thea Næss Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg Olja Zerajić
K1 Rules Flag of Italy.svg Silvia La Notte Flag of France.svg Anissa Meksen Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Veronika Petrikova Flag of Spain.svg Loli Munoz Flag of France.svg Mallaury Kalachnikoff
Style65 kg68 kg71 kg74 kg74+ kg
Low KickVacantVacantVacantVacantVacant
Full Contact Flag of Austria.svg Nicole Trimmel Flag of Italy.svg Cristina Caruso Flag of France.svg Cathy LeMee Flag of France.svg Cathy LeMeeVacant
K1 Rules Flag of Italy.svg Cristina CarusoVacant Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Trix MarchVacantVacant

As of July 14, 2020

Notable WAKO Pro world champions

See also

Related Research Articles

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Kickboxing is a stand-up combat sport based on kicking and punching, historically developed from karate mixed with boxing. Kickboxing is practiced for self-defence, general fitness, or as a contact sport.

Kick Physical strike using the leg, foot or knee

A kick is a physical strike using the leg, in unison usually with an area of the knee or lower using the foot, heel, tibia (shin), ball of the foot, blade of the foot, toes or knee. This type of attack is used frequently by hooved animals as well as humans in the context of stand-up fighting. Kicks play a significant role in many forms of martial arts, such as savate, taekwondo, MMA, sikaran, karate, Pankration, Kung Fu, Vovinam, kickboxing, Muay Thai, Yaw-Yan, capoeira, silat and kalaripayattu. Kicks are a universal act of aggression among humans.

Muay Thai Combat sport of Thailand (lit. "Thai boxing")

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Full contact karate is any format of karate where competitors spar full-contact and allow a knockout as winning criterion

Strike (attack) Directed physical attack

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Sanda (sport) Chinese self-defense system and combat sport

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Lethwei Unarmed Burmese martial art

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Combat sport type of sport

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Roundhouse kick a kick in which the practitioner lifts their knee while turning the supporting foot and body in a semicircular motion

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Clinch fighting Grappling position in boxing or wrestling, a stand-up embrace

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W.A.K.O. World Championships 2007 (Belgrade)

W.A.K.O. World Championships 2007 in Belgrade were the joint 16th edition of the W.A.K.O. world championships - the second event would be held later that year in Coimbra, Portugal. They were for amateur male and female kickboxers and covered the following categories; K-1, Low-Kick and Light-Contact. Weight classes for men ranged from light bantamweight to super heavyweight, while the women's ranged from featherweight to super heavyweight. More information on the categories, weight classes and rules is provided in the various sections below. In total there were 1085 athletes at the championships, representing sixty countries including China, fighting in 49 tournaments. The Belgrade championships were held at the Pionir Hall in Belgrade, Serbia from Monday, September 24 to Monday, October 1, 2007.

W.A.K.O. World Championships 2007 (Coimbra)

W.A.K.O. World Championships 2007 in Coimbra were the joint 16th edition of the W.A.K.O. world championships and was the second event. The championships were for amateur male and female kickboxers and martial artists, covering the following categories; Full-Contact, Semi-Contact, Musical Forms and Aero Kickboxing. In the contact kickboxing categories, weight classes ranged from light bantamweight to super heavyweight. The Musical Forms and Aero Kickboxing categories did not have weight classes but had different forms. More information on the categories, weight classes and rules is provided in the various sections below. In total there were around 600 competitors at the event, representing fifty countries from five continents, competing in forty-three competitions. The Coimbra championships were held at the Pavilhão Multiusos de Coimbra in Coimbra, Portugal from Monday, November 26 to Sunday, December 2, 2007.

W.A.K.O. World Championships 2001 (Belgrade)

W.A.K.O. World Championships 2001 were the joint thirteenth world kickboxing championships hosted by the W.A.K.O. organization. It was the second championships to be held in Serbia and Montenegro and was open to amateur men and women across the world.

W.A.K.O. European Championships 2002

W.A.K.O. European Championships 2002 in Jesolo was the sixteenth European championships to be held by the W.A.K.O.. It was the second championship to be held in Jesolo and the seventh to be held in Italy. W.A.K.O. had originally hoped to have a joint event that year like they had with the last world championships, with an event in Greece in October and another in Hungary in November, but due to the difficulties involved they scrapped the idea and resorted to Jesolo which had held a successful event two years previously.

W.A.K.O. European Championships 2004 (Budva)

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W.A.K.O. World Championships 2005 (Agadir)

W.A.K.O. World Championships 2005 in Agadir were the joint fifteenth world championships held by the W.A.K.O. organization and the first ever to be held in Morocco and the continent of Africa - with the other event to be held later that year in Szeged, Hungary. The championships were open to amateur men and women from across the world, with about roughly 48 countries providing around 350 athletes, who all attended despite initial fears about potential terrorist attacks.

W.A.K.O. European Championships 2006 (Skopje)

W.A.K.O. European Championships 2006 in Skopje were the joint eighteenth European kickboxing championships held by the W.A.K.O. organization. It was the first event to be held in the country of Republic of Macedonia and was organized by the nation's kickboxing president Ljupčo Nedelkovski, involving (mainly) amateur men and women from 31 countries across Europe.

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References

  1. "About W.A.K.O".
  2. "SportAccord Members".
  3. "WAKO rules and regulations" . Retrieved 2016-09-03.