World Trail Orienteering Championships

Last updated
World Trail Orienteering Championships
Status active
Genre sporting event
Date(s) June–August
Frequency annual
Location(s) various
Inaugurated 2004 (2004)
Organised by IOF

The World Trail Orienteering Championships (WTOC) were first held in 2004 and annually since them. The majority of the championships were held in Europe, with 2005 the only exception up to date.

Contents

The current championship events are:

Venues

Year Days Location [1]
2004 (in conjunction with FootO WOC 2004) September 15–18 Flag of Sweden.svg Västerås, Sweden [2]
2005 (in conjunction with FootO WOC 2005) August 9–11 Flag of Japan.svg Aichi, Japan [3]
2006 (in conjunction with WMTBOC 2006) July 9–14 Flag of Finland.svg Joensuu, Finland [4]
2007 (in conjunction with FootO WOC 2007) August 17–26 Flag of Ukraine.svg Kiev, Ukraine [5]
2008 (in conjunction with FootO WOC 2008) July 12–26 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Olomouc, Czech Republic [6]
2009 (in conjunction with FootO WOC 2009) August 18–23 Flag of Hungary.svg Miskolc, Hungary [7]
2010 (in conjunction with FootO WOC 2010) August 4–6 Flag of Norway.svg Trondheim, Norway [8]
2011 (in conjunction with FootO WOC 2011) August 13–20 Flag of France.svg Savoie, France [9]
2012 June 6–9 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Scotland, Great Britain [10]
2013 (in conjunction with FootO WOC 2013) July 6–14 Flag of Finland.svg Vuokatti, Finland [11]
2014 (in conjunction with FootO WOC 2014) July 5–13 Flag of Italy.svg Trentino-Veneto, Italy [12]
2015 June 22–28 Flag of Croatia.svg Zagreb, Croatia [13]
2016 (in conjunction with FootO WOC 2016) August 20–28 Flag of Sweden.svg Strömstad-Tanum, Sweden [14]
2017 July 10–15 Flag of Lithuania.svg Birstonas, Lithuania [15]
2018 (in conjunction with FootO WOC 2018) August 6–10 Flag of Latvia.svg Daugavpils, Latvia [16]
2019 June 23–29 Flag of Portugal.svg Idanha-a-Nova, Portugal
2020 Flag of Hong Kong.svg Hong Kong

PreO

This was called the "individual competition" before 2010.

Open

Year Gold Silver Bronze Number of controls (day 1) Number of controls (day 2)
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010 20 controls, 2 TCs [17] 20 controls, 2 TCs [18]
2011 20 controls, 2 TCs [19] 20 controls, 2 TCs [20]
2012 [21] Flag of Sweden.svg  Stig Gerdtman  (SWE)Flag of Ukraine.svg  Vitaliy Kyrychenko  (UKR)Flag of Ukraine.svg  Sergiy Stoian  (UKR) 20 controls (1 voided), 2 TCs [22] 23 controls, 2 TCs [23]
2013 [24] Flag of Finland.svg  Jari Turto  (FIN)Flag of Sweden.svg  Martin Fredholm  (SWE)Flag of Finland.svg  Antti Rusanen  (FIN) 20 controls, 2 timed stations, 4 TCs [25] 19 controls, 1 timed station, 2 TCs [26]
2014 [27] Flag of Latvia.svg  Guntars Mankus  (LAT)Flag of Sweden.svg  Marit Wiksell  (SWE)Flag of Norway.svg  Geir Myhr Øien  (NOR) 12 controls (1 voided), 1 timed station, 2 TCs [28] 20 controls, 2 timed station, 3 TCs [29]
2015 [30] Flag of Italy.svg  Michele Cera  (ITA)Flag of Finland.svg  Antti Rusanen  (FIN)Flag of Norway.svg  Martin Jullum  (NOR) 26 controls, 2 timed stations, 6 TCs [31] 26 controls, 2 timed stations, 6 TCs [32]
2016 [33] Flag of Sweden.svg  Martin Fredholm  (SWE)Flag of Norway.svg  Martin Jullum  (NOR)Flag of Latvia.svg  Janis Rukšans  (LAT) 21 controls (1 voided), 1 timed station, 3 TCs [34] 28 controls, 1 timed station, 3 TCs [35]
2017 [36] Flag of Norway.svg  Lars Jakob Waaler  (NOR)Flag of Finland.svg  Pinja Mäkinen  (FIN)Flag of Norway.svg  Geir Myhr Øien  (NOR) 21 controls (2 voided), 1 timed station, 3 TCs [37] 28 controls, 3 TCs [38]

Paralympic

Year Gold Silver Bronze Number of controls (day 1) Number of controls (day 2)
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010 20 controls, 2 TCs [39] 20 controls, 2 TCs [40]
2011 20 controls, 2 TCs [41] 20 controls, 2 TCs [42]
2012 [43] Flag of Sweden.svg  Ola Jansson  (SWE)Flag of Finland.svg  Pekka Seppä  (FIN)Flag of Russia.svg  Dmitry Kucherenko  (RUS) 20 controls (1 voided), 2 TCs [44] 23 controls, 2 TCs [45]
2013 [46] Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Jana Kostova  (CZE)Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Pavel Dudík  (CZE)Flag of Denmark.svg  Søren Saxtorph  (DEN) 20 controls, 2 timed stations, 4 TCs [47] 19 controls, 1 timed station, 2 TCs [48]
2014 [49] Flag of Sweden.svg  Michael Johansson  (SWE)Flag of Sweden.svg  Ola Jansson  (SWE)Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  John Crosby  (GBR) 12 controls (1 voided), 1 timed station, 2 TCs [50] 20 controls, 2 timed station, 3 TCs [51]
2015 [52] Flag of Ukraine.svg  Vladislav Vovk  (UKR)Flag of Croatia.svg  Ivica Bertol  (CRO)Flag of Denmark.svg  Søren Saxtorph  (DEN) 26 controls, 2 timed stations, 6 TCs [53] 26 controls, 2 timed stations, 6 TCs [54]
2016 [55] Flag of Sweden.svg  Michael Johansson  (SWE)Flag of Russia.svg  Pavel Shmatov  (RUS)Flag of Sweden.svg  Ola Jansson  (SWE) 21 controls (1 voided), 1 timed station, 3 TCs [56] 28 controls, 1 timed station, 3 TCs [57]
2017 [58] Flag of Sweden.svg  Ola Jansson  (SWE)Flag of Ukraine.svg  Vladyslav Vovk  (UKR)Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Jana Kostová  (CZE) 21 controls (2 voided), 1 timed station, 3 TCs [59] 28 controls, 3 TCs [60]

TempO (since 2013)

All competitors, regardless of disability, participate in one single class only since there is no physical movement involved in the competition process.

Year Gold Silver Bronze Number of controls (qualification) Number of controls (final)
2010
(World TempO Trophy)
2011
(World TempO Trophy)
2012 [61]
(World TempO Trophy)
Flag of Sweden.svg  Marit Wiksell  (SWE)Flag of Italy.svg  Guido Michelotti  (ITA)Flag of Norway.svg  Martin Jullum  (NOR) 8 timed stations, 24 TCs
2013 [62] Flag of Finland.svg  Pinja Mäkinen  (FIN)Flag of Sweden.svg  Marit Wiksell  (SWE)Flag of Finland.svg  Lauri Kontkanen  (FIN) 8 timed stations, 24 TCs 5 timed stations, 15 TCs
2014 [63] Flag of Norway.svg  Martin Jullum  (NOR)Flag of Finland.svg  Lauri Kontkanen  (FIN)Flag of Finland.svg  Pinja Mäkinen  (FIN) 6 timed stations, 24 TCs [64] 5 timed stations, 25 TCs [65]
2015 [66] Flag of Finland.svg  Antti Rusanen  (FIN)Flag of Slovakia.svg  Ján Furucz  (SVK)Flag of Norway.svg  Sondre Ruud Bråten  (NOR) 7 timed stations, 28 TCs [67] 7 timed stations, 35 TCs [68]
2016 [69] Flag of Norway.svg  Lars Jakob Waaler  (NOR)Flag of Sweden.svg  Marit Wiksell  (SWE)Flag of Finland.svg  Pinja Mäkinen  (FIN) 4 timed stations, 20 TCs [70] 5 timed stations, 30 TCs [71]
2017 [72] Flag of Norway.svg  Vetle Ruud Bråten  (NOR)Flag of Norway.svg  Martin Aarholt Waaler  (NOR)Flag of Slovakia.svg  Ján Furucz  (SVK) 5 timed stations, 25 TCs [73] 6 timed stations, 30 TCs [74]

Team competition (before 2015)

Open

Paralympic

Relay (since 2016)

Open

Paralympic

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References

  1. "Trail Orienteering". International Orienteering Federation . Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  2. "World Trail Orienteering Championships 2004". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  3. "World Trail Orienteering Championships 2005". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  4. "World Trail Orienteering Championships 2006". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  5. "World Trail Orienteering Championships 2007". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  6. "World Trail Orienteering Championships 2008". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  7. "World Trail Orienteering Championships 2009". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  8. "World Trail Orienteering Championships 2010". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  9. "World Trail Orienteering Championships 2011". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  10. "World Orienteering Trail Championships 2012". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  11. "World Trail Orienteering Championships 2013". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  12. "World Trail Orienteering Championships 2014". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  13. "World Trail Orienteering Championships 2015". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  14. "World Trail Orienteering Championships 2016". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  15. "World Trail Orienteering Championships 2017". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  16. "World Trail Orienteering Championships 2018". International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 2017-12-15.

WTOC