IFAF World Championship

Last updated

IFAF World Championship of American Football
Most recent season or competition:
2015 IFAF World Championship
Sport American football
Founded1999
No. of teams7 (tournament)
71 (eligible national teams)
Most recent
champion(s)
Flag of the United States.svg  United States (3rd title)
Most titlesFlag of the United States.svg  United States (3 titles)
Official website ifafworldchampionship.org

The IFAF World Championship of American Football (also known as the IFAF World Cup) is an international gridiron competition held every four years [1] and contested by teams representing member nations. The competition is run by the International Federation of American Football (IFAF), the international governing body for the sport. Seventy-one nations have a national American football team. The most recent tournament in 2015, there were seven teams in the tournament.

American football Team field sport

American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada and also known as gridiron, is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

The International Federation of American Football (IFAF) is the international governing body of gridiron associations. The IFAF oversees the IFAF World Championship of American Football, which is held every four years. The IFAF became a provisionary member of SportAccord in 2003, and became a full SportAccord member in 2005. The organisation's head office is located in the French commune of La Courneuve, in the Île-de-France region.

Contents

The defending champions are the United States, who won the 2015 championship after winning both the 2007 and 2011 editions. The American team did not participate in the World Cup until 2007 and won every tournament ever since. Prior to American participation, Japan won the 1999 and 2003 championships.

United States national American football team

The United States National American football team represents the United States in international men's American football competitions. It was controlled by USA Football, and was recognized by the International Federation of American Football (IFAF) until the 2015 split between IFAF Paris and IFAF New York.

The 2015 IFAF World Championship was the fifth instance of the IFAF World Championship, an international American football tournament. The United States hosted the tournament. Seven teams had confirmed their participation for the tournament in Canton, Ohio.

2007 IFAF World Championship

The 2007 IFAF World Championship was the third instance of the IFAF World Championship, the quadrennial international American football world championship tournament. It was held July 7–15, 2007 in Kawasaki, Kanagawa, Japan.

The championship was held in Italy in 1999, in Germany in 2003, in Kawasaki, Japan in 2007, and in Austria in 2011. The 2015 IFAF World Championship was originally going to be held in Stockholm, Sweden, however local organizers had to cancel the event due to lack of sponsorship. [2] The 2015 tournament was played in Canton, Ohio, United States. [3]

Italy republic in Southern Europe

Italy, officially the Italian Republic, is a country in Europe. Located in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, Italy shares open land borders with France, Switzerland, Austria, Slovenia and the enclaved microstates San Marino and Vatican City. Italy covers an area of 301,340 km2 (116,350 sq mi) and has a largely temperate seasonal and Mediterranean climate. With around 61 million inhabitants, it is the fourth-most populous EU member state and the most populous country in Southern Europe.

Kawasaki, Kanagawa Designated city in Kantō, Japan

Kawasaki is a city in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. It is the 8th most populated city in Japan and one of the main cities forming the Greater Tokyo Area and Keihin Industrial Area.

Japan Constitutional monarchy in East Asia

Japan is an island country in East Asia. Located in the Pacific Ocean, it lies off the eastern coast of the Asian continent and stretches from the Sea of Okhotsk in the north to the East China Sea and the Philippine Sea in the south.

Tournament format

At the 2011 championship, the championship tournament consisted of eight teams divided into two groups of four (there were six teams in 1999 and 2007, four in 2003, and seven in 2015). The opening round featured a round-robin tournament within the groups, with each team playing each other once. However, as opposed to a tournament bracket after the games were completed, the teams with the best record from each group met in the gold medal game, with the second-place teams in each group playing for the bronze medal, the third-place teams playing in the 5th-place game, and the fourth-place teams playing in the 7th-place game, thus guaranteeing each team four games.

A round-robin tournament is a competition in which each contestant meets all other contestants in turn. A round-robin contrasts with an elimination tournament, in which participants are eliminated after a certain number of losses.

Automatic berths included the host nation and the defending champions. Both finalists from the European Federation of American Football tournament received berths. Two teams from the Pan American Federation of American Football received berths, as did one member each from the Asian Federation of American Football and from the Oceania Federation of American Football.

For the 2019 championship, the tournament will expand to 12 teams. [4] Teams will be divided into four groups, each consisting of three teams. Teams will play the other two teams in their group once each, for a total of two group-stage games. Teams will then advance to the second round, and from there to the placement and medal games. [5]

Because American football is far more dominant in the United States than anywhere else in the world, the United States did not field a team in the tournament for its first two editions. The United States has fielded a squad for the last three iterations, but with extremely restrictive criteria that make most American football players ineligible for the team. Despite the restrictions, the United States has won all three world championships in which they have competed. Similarly, Canada (where Canadian football, a related sport, has widespread popularity) did not participate until the 2011 competition, when the Canadian team finished second to the United States.

Results

Summaries

YearHostFinalThird-place matchNumber of teams
WinnerScoreRunner-up3rd placeScore4th place
1999 Flag of Italy.svg
Italy
Flag of Japan.svg
Japan
[6]
6–0 (OT)Flag of Mexico.svg
Mexico
Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden [6]
38–13Flag of Italy.svg
Italy
6
2003 Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
Flag of Japan.svg
Japan
[7]
34–14Flag of Mexico.svg
Mexico
Flag of Germany.svg
Germany [7]
36–7Flag of France.svg
France
4
2007 Flag of Japan.svg
Japan
Flag of the United States.svg
United States
[8]
23–20 (2 OT)Flag of Japan.svg
Japan
Flag of Germany.svg
Germany [9]
7–0Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
6
2011 Flag of Austria.svg
Austria
Flag of the United States.svg
United States
[10]
50–7Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
Flag of Japan.svg
Japan [11]
17–14Flag of Mexico.svg
Mexico
8
2015 Flag of the United States.svg
United States
Flag of the United States.svg
United States
[12]
59–12Flag of Japan.svg
Japan
Flag of Mexico.svg
Mexico [13]
20–7Flag of France.svg
France
7
2019 Postponed to 2023 [14]
2023 Flag of Australia (converted).svg
Australia

Results

Cody Hawkins, quarterback of the United States 2011 World Championship team. Cody Hawkins Colorado.jpg
Cody Hawkins, quarterback of the United States 2011 World Championship team.
Team 1999
(6)
2003
(4)
2007
(6)
2011
(8)
2015
(7)
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 5th8th5th
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 7th
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 7th
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 2nd
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 6th
Flag of France.svg  France 4th6th6th4th
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 3rd3rd5th
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 4th
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 1st1st2nd3rd2nd
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 2nd2nd4th3rd
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea 5th6th
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 3rd4th
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 1st1st1st

Rankings

Pos.TeamChampionRunner-upThirdFourth
1stFlag of the United States.svg  United States 3 (2007, 2011, 2015)---
2ndFlag of Japan.svg  Japan 2 (1999, 2003)2 (2007, 2015)1 (2011)-
3rdFlag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 2 (1999, 2003)1 (2015)1 (2011)
4thFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 1 (2011)
5thFlag of Germany.svg  Germany 2 (2003, 2007)
6thFlag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 1 (1999)1 (2007)
7thFlag of France.svg  France 2 (2003, 2015)
8thFlag of Italy.svg  Italy 1 (1999)

IFAF World Championship Records

Rushing Yards

Tournament

447 - Lars Gustafsson, Sweden 1999 [15]

Game

232 - Lars Gustafsson, Sweden vs Italy 3 July 1999

Rushing Touchdowns

Tournament

5 - DeShawn Thomas, USA 2011

Game

3 - Mario Nerad, Australia vs Austria 15 July 2011

Passing Yards

Tournament

881 - Joachim Ullrich, Germany 2011

Game

281 - Kiernan Dorney, Australia vs Germany 12 July 2011

Touchdown Passes

Tournament

6 - Michael Faulds, Canada 2011
6 - Joachim Ullrich, Germany 2011

Game

4 Jared Stegman, Australia vs South Korea 9 July 2015

Interceptions Thrown

Tournament

7 - Jarkko Nieminen, Finland 1999

Game

3 - Kiernan Dorney, Austria vs Australia 15 July 2011
3 - Carlos Altimirano, Mexico vs Germany 10 July 2003
3 - Joachim Ullrich, Germany vs Mexico, 10 July 2003
3 - David Ward, Austria vs Japan 1 July 1999

Receiving Yards

Tournament

433 - Niklas Roemer, Germany 2011

Game

180 - Niklas Roemer, Germany vs France 16 July 2011

Receptions

Tournament

26 - Nate Kmic, USA 2011

Game

8 - Niklas Roemer, Germany vs Austria 12 July 2011
8 - Nate Kmic, USA vs Germany 12 July 2011
8 - Boti Bramer, Germany vs Mexico 10 July 2003

Touchdown Receptions

Tournament

4 - Niklas Roemer, Germany 2011
4 - Matteo Soresini, Italy 1999

Game

2 - by several players, most recent: Trent Steelman, USA vs France 15 July 2015

Longest Plays

Rushing

88 - N.Khandar France vs Australia 12 July 2015

Passing

89 - Ullrich to Roemer, Germany vs France 16 July 2011

Punt Return

85 - Marcel Duft, Germany vs Sweden 14 July 2007

Kickoff Return

102 - Anthony Dablé, France vs Brazil 8 July 2015

Interception Return

95 - Marcus Weil, Germany vs USA 12 July 2007

Fumble Return

10 Terrence Jackson, USA vs Germany 7 July 2011

Field Goal

56 - Jose Maltos, Mexico vs Austria 10 July 2011

Blocked Punt Return Touchdown

26 Diezeas Calbert, USA vs. Australia 8 July 2011

Blocked Field Goal Return Touchdown

75 Johnny Dingle, USA vs Germany 10 July 2011

See also

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References

  1. "IFAF Senior World Championship". International Federation of American Football. Retrieved October 21, 2011. The IFAF Senior World Championship is held every four years having first been contested in 1999.
  2. http://stockholm2015.org/world-championship-moves/%5B%5D
  3. "EIGHT TEAMS TO BATTLE FOR THE IFAF WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP IN CANTON, OHIO". International Federation of American Football. Retrieved February 16, 2015. The 2015 IFAF World Championship will be contested in Canton, Ohio between the 8th and 19th of July with all games staged at Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium.
  4. "SWEDEN TO HOST 2015 INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF AMERICAN FOOTBALL SENIOR WORLD". International Federation of American Football. October 12, 2011. Retrieved October 21, 2011. Sweden will host the 2015 International Federation of American Football Senior World Championship when the national teams of 12 countries from four continents converge on the capital city of Stockholm.
  5. "SWEDEN TO HOST 2015 INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF AMERICAN FOOTBALL SENIOR WORLD". International Federation of American Football. October 12, 2011. Retrieved October 21, 2011. At the 2015 tournament the 12 teams will be split into four groups of three for a round robin stage leading to the second round and then placement and medal games that will take place during 10 playing days with rest days in between.
  6. 1 2 "STATISTICS". Federazione Italiana American Football. Archived from the original on June 2, 2002. Retrieved October 21, 2011.
  7. 1 2 "SCHEDULE". German Football Partners. Archived from the original on February 18, 2013. Retrieved October 21, 2011.
  8. "Japan(20)-USA(23)". Japan American Football Association. Retrieved October 21, 2011. Kicker/punter Craig Coffin nailed a 23-yard game-winning field goal in the second series of overtime to help the tournament debutant U.S. team grab the first championship with the 23-20 victory over the host Japan in the 3rd IFAF World Championships at Todoroki Stadium on Sunday afternoon.
  9. "Sweden(0)-Germany(7)". Japan American Football Association. Retrieved October 21, 2011. Marcel Duft returned a punt for 85 yards for the game’s only touchdown with 2:26 remaining in the third quarter and Germany defeated Sweden 7-0 to win the bronze medal of the third IFAF World Championship on Saturday at Kawasaki Stadium.
  10. "USA defends SWC title". American Football Bund Österreich. July 16, 2011. Archived from the original on June 18, 2014. Retrieved August 17, 2014. USA won the gold medal at the IFAF World Championship against Canada with a score of 50:7 in front of 20.000 fans in Vienna, Austria.
  11. "Japan earns bronze medal". American Football Bund Österreich. July 15, 2011. Archived from the original on November 13, 2011. Retrieved October 21, 2011. A blocked field goal in the final seconds of the game for the 3rd place at the IFAF World Championship saved the bronze medal for Team Japan.
  12. "United States 59, Japan 12". USA Football. Retrieved July 18, 2015. By the time the gold medal game of the International Federation of American Football World Championship was over, the United States was looking at its third straight title.
  13. "Bronze Medal Game: Mexico 20, France 7". USA Football. Retrieved July 18, 2015. For Mexico, there was much more at stake than a 20-7 win over France in the bronze medal match in the International Federation of American Football World Championships.
  14. "IFAF postpones World Championships until 2023". American Football International. 2018-12-07. Retrieved 2019-01-07.
  15. http://ifaf.org/media/download/819