PDC World Darts Championship

Last updated

PDC World Darts Championship
William Hill WDC logo.jpg

2009 World Darts Championship.jpg
Tournament information
Venue Circus Tavern (1994–2007)
Alexandra Palace (since 2008)
Location Purfleet (1994–2007)
London (since 2008)
Country England
Established1994
Organisation(s) PDC
Format Sets
Prize fund £2,500,000 (2020)
Month(s) PlayedDecember/January
Current champion(s)
Flag of Scotland.svg Peter Wright

The PDC World Darts Championship, known for sponsorship purposes as the William Hill World Darts Championship, organised by the Professional Darts Corporation (PDC), is one of the two separate World Professional Darts Championships held annually in the sport of darts. The other is the BDO World Darts Championship organised by the British Darts Organisation (BDO). The PDC championship begins in December and ends in January and is held at Alexandra Palace in London. It is the highest profile of the PDC's tournaments, with the winner receiving the Sid Waddell Trophy, named in honour of the darts commentator Sid Waddell, who died in 2012.

Contents

The PDC championship began in 1994 as the WDC World Darts Championship as one of the consequences of the split in darts, which saw the World Darts Council break away from the BDO. As a result of the settlement between the BDO and the WDC in 1997, the WDC became the PDC, and players are now free to choose which world championship to enter (but not both in the same year), as long as they meet certain eligibility criteria.

The current PDC champion is Peter Wright. With 14 wins from 25 appearances, Phil Taylor has dominated the competition, last winning it in 2013. Other than Taylor, there have been eight other champions. The other players to win it more than once are Michael van Gerwen (2014, 2017 & 2019), John Part (2003 & 2008), Adrian Lewis (2011 & 2012) and Gary Anderson (2015 & 2016) . The one-time winners are the inaugural champion Dennis Priestley, the Dutchman Raymond van Barneveld (2007), Rob Cross (2018) and Peter Wright (2020).

History

In 1992, some high-profile players, including all previous winners of the BDO World Darts Championship still active in the game, formed the WDC (now PDC), and in 1994, held their first World Championship. Dennis Priestley won the inaugural competition.

The players who broke away were taking a significant gamble – the tournament was broadcast on satellite television rather than terrestrial, and from 1994 to 2001, the prize fund for the players in the WDC/PDC World Championship was lower than the prize fund in the BDO version, although the 1997 PDC World Champion received £45,000 compared to that year's BDO World Champion receiving £38,000. In 2002, the PDC prize fund overtook that of the BDO for the first time, and the PDC event now boasts the largest prize fund of any darts competition. In 2010, the prize fund reached £1 million for the first time, with the World Champion collecting £200,000.

The 2014 and 2015 PDC World Champions collected £250,000 for their respective wins. In 2018, the prize fund will be increased to £1.8 million, with the World Champion receiving £400,000. [1]

Venue

The PDC World Darts Championship has been held at Alexandra Palace in London since 2008, having previously been held at the Circus Tavern in Purfleet, Essex, from 1994 to 2007. [2]

List of finals

YearChampion (average in final) [3] T.ScoreRunner-up (average in final)Prize moneySponsorVenue
Total [4] ChampionRunner-up
1994 Flag of England.svg Dennis Priestley (94.38)1st6–1 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor (85.62)£64,000£16,000£8,000 Skol Circus Tavern,
Purfleet
1995 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor (94.11)1st6–2 Flag of England.svg Rod Harrington (87.15)£55,000£12,000£6,000 Proton Cars
1996 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor (98.52)2nd6–4 Flag of England.svg Dennis Priestley (101.48)£62,500£14,000£7,000 Vernon's Pools
1997 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor (100.92)3rd6–3 Flag of England.svg Dennis Priestley (96.78)£99,500£45,000£10,000Red Band
1998 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor (103.98)4th6–0 Flag of England.svg Dennis Priestley (90.75)£72,500£20,000 Skol
1999 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor (97.11)5th6–2 Flag of England.svg Peter Manley (93.63)£104,000£30,000£16,000
2000 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor (94.42)6th7–3 Flag of England.svg Dennis Priestley (91.80)£111,000£31,000£16,400
2001 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor (107.46)7th7–0 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg John Part (92.58)£125,000£33,000£18,000
2002 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor (98.47)8th7–0 Flag of England.svg Peter Manley (91.35)£205,000£50,000£25,000
2003 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg John Part (96.87)1st7–6 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor (99.98)£237,000 Ladbrokes
2004 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor (96.03)9th7–6 Flag of England.svg Kevin Painter (90.48)£257,000
2005 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor (96.14)10th7–4 Flag of England.svg Mark Dudbridge (90.66)£300,000£60,000£30,000
2006 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor (106.74)11th7–0 Flag of England.svg Peter Manley (91.72)£500,000£100,000£50,000
2007 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Raymond van Barneveld (100.93)1st7–6 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor (100.86)
2008 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg John Part (92.86)2nd7–2 Flag of England.svg Kirk Shepherd (85.10)£589,000 Alexandra Palace,
London
2009 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor (110.94)12th7–1 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Raymond van Barneveld (101.18)£724,000£125,000£60,000
2010 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor (104.38)13th7–3 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Simon Whitlock (100.51)£1,000,000£200,000£100,000
2011 Flag of England.svg Adrian Lewis (99.40)1st7–5 Flag of Scotland.svg Gary Anderson (99.41)
2012 Flag of England.svg Adrian Lewis (93.06)2nd7–3 Flag of England.svg Andy Hamilton (90.83)
2013 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor (103.04)14th7–4 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Michael van Gerwen (100.66)
2014 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Michael van Gerwen (100.10)1st7–4 Flag of Scotland.svg Peter Wright (95.71)£1,050,000£250,000
2015 Flag of Scotland.svg Gary Anderson (97.68)1st7–6 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor (100.69)£1,250,000£120,000 William Hill
2016 Flag of Scotland.svg Gary Anderson (99.26)2nd7–5 Flag of England.svg Adrian Lewis (100.23)£1,500,000£300,000£150,000
2017 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Michael van Gerwen (107.79)2nd7–3 Flag of Scotland.svg Gary Anderson (104.93)£1,650,000£350,000£160,000
2018 Flag of England.svg Rob Cross (107.67)1st7–2 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor (102.26)£1,800,000£400,000£170,000
2019 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Michael van Gerwen (102.21)3rd7–3 Flag of England.svg Michael Smith (95.29)£2,500,000£500,000£200,000
2020 Flag of Scotland.svg Peter Wright (102.79)1st7–3 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Michael van Gerwen (102.88)
2021

Records and statistics

As of 1 January 2020

Total finalist appearances

RankPlayerWinnerRunner-upFinalsAppearances
1 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor 1451925
2 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Michael van Gerwen 32513
3 Flag of Scotland.svg Gary Anderson 22411
4 Flag of England.svg Adrian Lewis 21315
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg John Part 21318
6 Flag of England.svg Dennis Priestley 14519
7 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Raymond van Barneveld 11214
Flag of Scotland.svg Peter Wright 11211
9 Flag of England.svg Rob Cross 1013
10 Flag of England.svg Peter Manley 03313
11 Flag of England.svg Mark Dudbridge 01110
Flag of England.svg Andy Hamilton 01112
Flag of England.svg Rod Harrington 01110
Flag of England.svg Kevin Painter 01117
Flag of England.svg Kirk Shepherd 0114
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Simon Whitlock 01112
Flag of England.svg Michael Smith 0119

Champions by country

CountryPlayersTotalFirst titleLast title
Flag of England.svg  England 41819942018
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 2420072019
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 2320152020
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 1220032008

Nine-dart finishes

Nine nine-darters have been thrown at the World Championship. The first one was in 2009.

PlayerYear (+ Round)MethodOpponentResult
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Raymond van Barneveld 2009, Quarter-Final 3 x T20; 3 x T20; T20, T19, D12 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Jelle Klaasen Won
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Raymond van Barneveld 2010, 2nd Round 3 x T20; 3 x T20; T20, T19, D12 Ulster Banner.svg Brendan Dolan Won
Flag of England.svg Adrian Lewis 2011, Final 3 x T20; 3 x T20; T20, T19, D12 Flag of Scotland.svg Gary Anderson Won
Flag of England.svg Dean Winstanley 2013, 2nd Round 3 x T20; 3 x T20; T20, T19, D12 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Vincent van der Voort Lost
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Michael van Gerwen 2013, Semi-Final 3 x T20; 2 x T20, T19; 2 x T20, D12 Flag of England.svg James Wade Won
Flag of England.svg Terry Jenkins 2014, 1st Round 3 x T20; 3 x T20; T20, T19, D12 Flag of Denmark.svg Per Laursen Lost
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Kyle Anderson 2014, 1st Round 3 x T20; 3 x T20; T20, T19, D12 Flag of England.svg Ian White Lost
Flag of England.svg Adrian Lewis 2015, 3rd Round 3 x T20; 3 x T20; T20, T19, D12 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Raymond van Barneveld Lost
Flag of Scotland.svg Gary Anderson 2016, Semi-Final 3 x T20; 3 x T20; T20, T19, D12 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Jelle Klaasen Won

Averages

Since the breakaway of the PDC players, there has been much debate about the relative merits of the players within each organisation. The debate often focuses on the three-dart averages of players in matches.

An average over 100 in a match in the PDC World Championship has since been achieved 195 times. [5] This is compared to 21 times in the BDO World Championship, following the 2019 event. In 2010 Phil Taylor became the first player to average over 100 in all six rounds of the tournament. He repeated this feat (though lost the final) in 2015 and Michael van Gerwen achieved it in 2017 and 2019.

An average of over 105 in a match in the PDC World Championship has been achieved 40 times. The highest match average ever in the BDO World Championship is 103.83 by Raymond van Barneveld in his quarter-final victory over John Walton in 2004.

Ten highest PDC World Championship one-match averages [6]
AveragePlayerYear (+Round)OpponentResult
114.05 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Michael van Gerwen 2017, Semi-Final Flag of the Netherlands.svg Raymond van Barneveld 6–2
111.21 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor 2002, 2nd Round Flag of England.svg Shayne Burgess 6–1
110.94 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor 2009, Final Flag of the Netherlands.svg Raymond van Barneveld 7–1
109.34 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Raymond van Barneveld 2017, Semi-Final Flag of the Netherlands.svg Michael van Gerwen 2–6
109.23 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Michael van Gerwen 2016, 2nd Round Flag of England.svg Darren Webster 4–0
109.00 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor 2007, 2nd Round Flag of Ireland.svg Mick McGowan 4–1
108.80 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor 2009, Quarter-Final Flag of the Netherlands.svg Co Stompé 5–0
108.65 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Michael van Gerwen 2018, 2nd Round Flag of England.svg James Wilson 4–0
108.39 Flag of Scotland.svg Gary Anderson 2011, 3rd Round Flag of England.svg Andy Smith 4–0
108.31 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Raymond van Barneveld 2013, 1st Round Flag of England.svg Michael Smith 3–0
Five highest losing averages
AveragePlayerYear (+Round)OpponentResult
109.34 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Raymond van Barneveld 2017, Semi-Final Flag of the Netherlands.svg Michael van Gerwen 2–6
106.09 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Jeffrey de Zwaan 2019, 2nd Round Flag of England.svg Rob Cross 1–3
106.07 Flag of Spain.svg Cristo Reyes 2017, 2nd Round Flag of the Netherlands.svg Michael van Gerwen 2–4
105.78 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Michael van Gerwen 2016, 3rd Round Flag of the Netherlands.svg Raymond van Barneveld 3–4
104.93 Flag of Scotland.svg Gary Anderson 2017, Final Flag of the Netherlands.svg Michael van Gerwen 3–7
Five highest combined match averages
AverageWinnerYear (+Round)LoserResult
223.39 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Michael van Gerwen
114.05
2017, Semi-Final Flag of the Netherlands.svg Raymond van Barneveld
109.34
6–2
212.72 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Michael van Gerwen
107.79
2017, Final Flag of Scotland.svg Gary Anderson
104.93
7–3
212.12 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor
110.94
2009, Final Flag of the Netherlands.svg Raymond van Barneveld
101.18
7–1
211.31 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Michael van Gerwen
105.24
2017, 2nd Round Flag of Spain.svg Cristo Reyes
106.07
4–2
210.82 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor
109.00
2007, 2nd Round Flag of Ireland.svg Mick McGowan
101.82
4–1
Different players with a 100+ match average
PlayerTotalHighest Av.Year (+Round)
Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor 56111.21 2002, 2nd Round
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Michael van Gerwen 30114.05 2017, Semi-Final
Flag of Scotland.svg Gary Anderson 20108.39 2011, 3rd Round
Flag of England.svg Adrian Lewis 15106.51 2010, 1st Round
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Raymond van Barneveld 13109.34 2017, Semi-Final
Flag of Scotland.svg Peter Wright 12105.86 2020, Quarter-Final
Flag of England.svg Michael Smith 7105.22 2019, Semi-Final
Flag of England.svg Rob Cross 6107.67 2018, Final
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Simon Whitlock 6105.37 2010, Quarter-Final
Flag of England.svg Dave Chisnall 4104.63 2017, Quarter-Final
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Dimitri Van den Bergh 3104.45 2019, 2nd Round
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Jelle Klaasen 3102.54 2016, 1st Round
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Jamie Lewis 2107.27 2018, 2nd Round
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Jeffrey de Zwaan 2106.09 2019, 2nd Round
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Gerwyn Price 2104.20 2020, 3rd Round
Flag of England.svg Terry Jenkins 2102.64 2012, 3rd Round
Flag of England.svg Andy Hamilton 2102.04 2012, Quarter-Final
Flag of England.svg Chris Dobey 2101.09 2020, 3rd Round
Ulster Banner.svg Daryl Gurney 2100.51 2018, 1st Round
Flag of Spain.svg Cristo Reyes 1106.07 2017, 2nd Round
Flag of England.svg Darren Webster 1104.64 2017, 2nd Round
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Richie Burnett 1103.38 2001, 1st Round
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Kim Huybrechts 1103.26 2019, 2nd Round
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Corey Cadby 1102.48 2017, Preliminary
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Co Stompé 1102.42 2010, 3rd Round
Flag of England.svg Stephen Bunting 1102.34 2015, 3rd Round
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Benito van de Pas 1102.30 2017, 3rd Round
Flag of Ireland.svg Mick McGowan 1101.82 2007, 2nd Round
Flag of England.svg Ryan Searle 1101.54 2020, 2nd Round
Flag of Scotland.svg Robert Thornton 1101.49 2015, Quarter-Final
Flag of England.svg Dennis Priestley 1101.48 1996, Final
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Vincent van der Voort 1101.17 2018, 2nd Round
Flag of England.svg Joe Cullen 1100.88 2017, 1st Round
Flag of England.svg Nathan Aspinall 1100.53 2019, Semi-Final
Flag of England.svg Ian White 1100.33 2020, 2nd Round
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Christian Kist 1100.23 2018, 1st Round
Ten highest tournament averages (min 3 matches)
AveragePlayerYearRound (+result)Reference
106.32 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Michael van Gerwen 2017 Final (won) [7]
104.68 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Michael van Gerwen 2016 3rd Round [8]
104.63 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor 2010 Final (won) [9]
104.19 Flag of England.svg Adrian Lewis 2010 Quarter-Final [9]
104.08 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor 2009 Final (won) [10]
104.05 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Michael van Gerwen 2018 Semifinal [11]
103.45 Flag of Scotland.svg Gary Anderson 2017 Final (loss) [12]
103.38 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Michael van Gerwen 2019 Final (won) [13]
103.06 Flag of Scotland.svg Gary Anderson 2011 Final (loss) [14]
102.83 Flag of England.svg Phil Taylor 2006 Final (won) [15]

Records

Most titles: 14, Phil Taylor. Taylor's two BDO titles take his total to 16, a record across both organisations. [16] [17]
Most finals: 19, Phil Taylor, 1994–2007, 2009–2010, 2013, 2015 and 2018. [16]
Most match wins: 110, Phil Taylor, 1994–2018. Taylor has only lost 11 matches at the tournament and reached every final from 1994 until 2008, when he was beaten in the quarter-finals by Wayne Mardle. [18] [19] [20]
Longest unbeaten run: 44 matches, Phil Taylor, 1995–2003, between his defeats in the 1994 and 2003 finals.
Most 180s in a tournament (total): 828 in 2018. This was the first tournament to feature a 96 player field. [21]
Most 180s in a tournament (individual): 71, Gary Anderson (2017) [22]
Most 180s in a match: 22, Gary Anderson (2017 final) [23]
Most 180s in a match (both players): 42, Gary Anderson (22) and Michael van Gerwen (20) (2017 final)
Longest streak of 100+ averages: 19 matches, Michael van Gerwen, 2016–2019 [24]
Most appearances: 25, Phil Taylor.
Youngest player: Mitchell Clegg, 16 years and 37 days. Clegg qualified as a 15-year-old in 2007. He was younger than Michael van Gerwen, who set the BDO World Championship youngest player record a few weeks later.
Youngest finalist: Kirk Shepherd, 21 years and 88 days In the 2008 final, [16] Shepherd was two days younger than Jelle Klaasen, who won the BDO title in 2006.
Record TV audience: 1,500,000 (2015 Final). The 2007 final was the first time that Sky Television achieved a viewing figure of over 1 million for a darts match. The 2013 final had a 1.2 million average, with 10 million viewers over the course of the tournament. [25]
Won both World Championships: Four players. Dennis Priestley was the first player to win both versions of the World Championship, [26] [27] winning the 1991 BDO Championship and the 1994 PDC Championship. Phil Taylor, John Part and Raymond van Barneveld have since matched the feat. [26] [27]
Overseas World Champions: Three players. John Part was the first player from outside the UK to win the PDC World Championship with his 2003 title, followed by Raymond van Barneveld in 2007 and Michael van Gerwen in 2014. Part was also the first overseas player to win the BDO title, doing so in 1994.

Media

The stage at the 2009 World Championship. 2009 World Darts Championship.jpg
The stage at the 2009 World Championship.

Domestic broadcaster

The PDC World Championship has been broadcast live and in its entirety by Sky Sports in the UK since its inception. Since 2009 the tournament has been shot in High Definition (HD). Their coverage is currently presented from a studio overlooking the interior of the Alexandra Palace venue.

The current presenting team is as follows:

Presenters

Co-presenters

Commentators:

Former presenters and commentators have been:

Overseas broadcasters

Dutch broadcaster SBS6, having covered the BDO World Darts Championship for many years, also covered the event until RTL7 took over broadcasting. Fox Sports (Australia), TSN (Canada), SuperSport (South Africa), Sky Sport (New Zealand), StarHub (Singapore), Ten Sports (India), CCTV (China), Showtime (Middle East), Ukraine TV, IKO (Poland), NOVA Sport (Czech Republic and Slovakia), Sport1 (Hungary), Meersat (Malaysia), 7TV (Russia), Measat (Indonesia), J Sports (Japan), DAZN (USA, Italy), GOL TV (Spain) Eurosport (Romania) now also broadcast the event.

Viewing figures

Television viewing figures for the final are as follows: [28]

YearBroadcaster
Sky UK NetherlandsGermany SPORT1
20201,006,553 [29] 1,200,000 (RTL 7) [30] 1,590,000 [31]
2019658,3001,540,000 (RTL 7) [32] 1,490,000 [33]
20181,400,000864,000 (RTL 7)2,150,000 [34]
2017607,0002,170,000 (RTL 7) [35] 1,480,000 [36]
2016908,000869,000 (RTL 7) [37] 950,000 [38]
20151.5 million peak [39] 908,000 (RTL 7) [40] 1,360,000 [41]
2014668,0002,054,000 (RTL 7)560,000 [42]
20131,270,000 [43] 1,748,000 (RTL 7)810,000
2012728,000762,000 (RTL 7)
2011920,000435,000 (SBS6)
2010888,000854,000 (SBS6)730,000
2009809,0001,441,000 (SBS6)490,000
2008731,000211,000 (compilation SBS6)340,000
20071,028,0001,339,000 (SBS6)
2006761,000
2005530,000
2004820,000
2003610,000
2002Unavailable
2001420,000
2000240,000
1999200,000

Webcasting

The PDC world championship events are now broadcast on www.livepdc.tv which shows the events live, highlights and also classic matches. This website is a subscription only viewing and is limited to certain territorial restrictions.

The tournament has been sponsored by bookmaker William Hill since 2015. Previous sponsors have been:

Trophy

Following popular darts commentator Sid Waddell's death on 11 August 2012, the decision was made to rename the champion's trophy to the Sid Waddell trophy from the 2013 tournament onwards. [44]

Notes and references

  1. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 28 December 2018. Retrieved 8 July 2015.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. "PDC championship moves to London". BBC Sport. 2 April 2007. Retrieved 2 April 2007.
  3. Each player's average score is based on the average for each 3-dart visit to the board (ie total points scored divided by darts thrown and multiplied by 3)
  4. PDC World Championship prize fund dartsdatabase
  5. http://www.dartsdatabase.co.uk/TournamentPlayerStats.aspx?tournStatKey=6&tournKey=11&pg=1
  6. dartsdatabase.co.uk; best winning averages
  7. "2017 PDC World Championship Tournament averages". Darts Database. Retrieved 24 November 2018.
  8. "2016 PDC World Championship tournament averages". Darts Database. Retrieved 24 November 2018.
  9. 1 2 "2010 PDC World Championship tournament averages" . Retrieved 24 November 2018.
  10. "2009 PDC World Championship tournament averages". Darts Database. Retrieved 24 November 2018.
  11. "2018 PDC World Championship tournament averages". Darts Database. Retrieved 24 November 2018.
  12. "2017 PDC World Championship tournament averages". Darts Database. Retrieved 24 November 2018.
  13. "2019 PDC World Championship tournament averages". Darts Database. Retrieved 16 January 2019.
  14. "2011 PDC World Championship tournament averages". Darts Database. Retrieved 24 November 2018.
  15. "2006 PDC World Championship tournament averages". Darts Database. Retrieved 24 November 2018.
  16. 1 2 3 http://www.dartsdatabase.co.uk/TournamentStats.aspx?tournKey=11
  17. http://www.dartsdatabase.co.uk/TournamentPlayerStats.aspx?tournKey=11
  18. "PDC WC Match wins page 1". Darts Database. Retrieved 14 January 2015.
  19. "PDC WC match wins page 2". Darts Database. Retrieved 14 January 2015.
  20. "PDC WC match wins page 3". Darts Database. Retrieved 14 January 2015.
  21. http://www.dartsdatabase.co.uk/EventStats.aspx?EventKey=8809&pg=1
  22. dartsdatabse.co.uk; Most 180's in a tournament
  23. http://www.dartsdatabase.co.uk/TournamentPlayerStats.aspx?tournStatKey=8&tournKey=11&pg=1
  24. https://www.pdc.tv/news/2019/01/02/van-gerwen-i-handled-pressure
  25. pdc.tv Archived 3 March 2016 at the Wayback Machine ; Record Viewing Figures
  26. 1 2 http://www.dartsdatabase.co.uk/TournamentDetails.aspx?tournKey=11
  27. 1 2 http://www.dartsdatabase.co.uk/TournamentDetails.aspx?TournKey=2
  28. BARB viewing figures Archived 2007-10-16 at the Wayback Machine
  29. "Weekly top programmes on four screens (28 days) – Sky Sport Main Event=511,000 – Sky Sports Darts=495,553". BARB.
  30. "Netherlands viewing figures 1 January 2020". kijkonderzoek.nl (in Dutch). Archived from the original on 3 January 2020. Retrieved 3 January 2020.
  31. SPORT1 (2 January 2020). "Peter Wrights erster Weltmeistertitel beschert SPORT1 zweitbeste Darts-Übertragung seiner Geschichte: 1,59 Millionen Zuschauer im Schnitt und 2,22 Millionen Zuschauer in der Spitze verfolgen Finale der diesjährigen Darts-WM". sport1.de (in German).
  32. BuzzE/NU.nl (2 January 2019). "1,54 miljoen Nederlandse kijkers voor WK-finale darts". nu.nl (in Dutch).
  33. SPORT1 (2 January 2019). "Darts-WM 2019: Rekord-Quote für SPORT1 bei Finale mit van Gerwen". sport1.de (in German).
  34. SPORT1 (2 January 2018). "Darts-WM 2018: Finale mit Phil Taylor beschert SPORT1 Rekordquote". sport1.de (in German).
  35. . Retrieved on 2017-01-03.
  36. Niemaier, Timo (3 January 2017). "Darts-WM: Neuer Quotenrekord für Sport1 zum Finale – DWDL.de". DWDL.de (in German). Retrieved 18 December 2017.
  37. . Retrieved on 2017-12-16.
  38. Sülter, Björn (4 January 2016). "SportCheck: Darts-Rekorde, Insel-Showdown & Schanzenfieber". Quotenmeter (in German). Retrieved 18 December 2017.
  39. http://www.digitalspy.co.uk/tv/news/a619350/gary-andersons-pdc-world-darts-win-pulls-in-viewers-for-sky-sports.html
  40. Kijkonderzoek. Retrieved on 2015-01-05.
  41. http://www.quotenmeter.de/n/75469/der-grosse-wurf-darts-finale-fuehrt-sport1-zu-allzeit-rekord
  42. DWDL: Darts-WM: Sport1 katapultiert sich vor Vox
  43. BARB. BARB. Retrieved on 2013-08-13.
  44. "World Darts Trophy Named After Waddell". Sky News. 13 August 2012. Retrieved 13 August 2013.

Related Research Articles

Phil Taylor (darts player) English darts player

Philip Douglas Taylor is a retired English professional darts player, nicknamed The Power. Taylor dominated darts for over two decades and won 214 professional tournaments, including a record 85 major titles and a record 16 World Championships. In 2015, the BBC rated him among the ten greatest British sportsmen of the last 35 years. He is the richest and most successful darts player in history.

Raymond van Barneveld Dutch darts player

Raymond van Barneveld is a retired Dutch professional darts player. Nicknamed Barney, although originally known as The Man, he is one of the most successful darts players in history. Van Barneveld is a five-time World Darts Champion, a two-time UK Open Champion and a former winner of the Las Vegas Desert Classic, the Grand Slam of Darts and the Premier League. He is also a twice-winner of the World Masters and the World Darts Trophy, and a three-time winner of the International Darts League and the WDF World Cup Singles event.

The Professional Darts Corporation (PDC) is a professional darts organisation in the United Kingdom, established in 1992 when a group of leading players split from the British Darts Organisation to form what was initially called the World Darts Council (WDC). Sports promoter Barry Hearn is the PDC chairman.

John Part is a Canadian professional darts player and commentator, nicknamed Darth Maple. Part is a three-times World Champion, having won the 1994 BDO World Darts Championship, and the PDC World Championship in 2003 and 2008. He is statistically North America's greatest darts player to date. He has the distinction of being the first non-UK player to win the World Championship, and the only non-European to date to win the PDC World Darts Championship. His first Championship was the second time a non-seeded player won the BDO World Darts Championship, and one of the few times where a player only lost one set in the entire tournament. His nine year gap between his first and second World Championships is tied with Ted Hankey for the longest gap between World Championships, and his third triumph in 2008 saw him become the first player in history to win a world title in three different venues, and the first to win at the Alexandra Palace. His 2008 win saw him join Phil Taylor, Eric Bristow, Raymond van Barneveld and John Lowe as the only players with three or more World Championships, and become only the second player to win multiple PDC titles. His eleven televised PDC finals is tied with Dennis Priestley for the eighth most all time, and his £874,151 in prize money to date is the sixteenth highest amount in PDC history. Similar with Cliff Thorburn in snooker, Part remains the only darts champion from the Americas.

British Darts Organisation

The British Darts Organisation (BDO) is a darts organisation founded on 7 January 1973 by Olly Croft. The BDO was a founder member of the World Darts Federation which was formed in 1976 but due to a recent WDF ruling they are now considered an associate member. The BDO is made up of 66 member counties in Britain and organises tournaments for semi-professionals and amateurs.

Steve Beaton English darts player

Steve Beaton is an English professional darts player for the Professional Darts Corporation (PDC). He won the BDO World Darts Championship in 1996 and is a former World No. 1.

Mervyn King is an English professional darts player, who plays in Professional Darts Corporation tournaments. His nickname is The King. He has reached 5 PDC major TV finals, and has reached no.4 in the world rankings.

Dennis Priestley English darts player

Dennis Priestley is a retired English professional darts player. He has won two world championships, and was the first player to win both the BDO and WDC world championships, in 1991 and 1994 respectively. He is nicknamed "The Menace", after the cartoon character Dennis the Menace, and reflects this by wearing red and black, and using red and black flights.

The BDO World Darts Championship is a world championship competition in darts, organised by the British Darts Organisation (BDO). It began in 1978, and was, alongside the World Darts Federation's World Cup of Darts, one of two world championship tournaments until 1993. Since 1994, following a dispute with the BDO and the subsequent fallout, a breakaway group stages its own annual PDC World Championship, generally before the BDO version in late December and early January of each year.

Michael van Gerwen Dutch darts player

Michael van Gerwen is a Dutch professional darts player. He is currently ranked number one in the world, having won the PDC World Darts Championship in 2014, 2017, and 2019. He began playing darts at the age of 13. He won the 2006 World Masters and threw a televised nine-dart finish at the 2007 Masters of Darts, becoming the youngest player to do either at age 17. However, after this initial burst onto the darting scene, Van Gerwen struggled for consistent form until his breakthrough year in 2012. Improving from world number 38 at the start of 2012 to number four at the beginning of 2013, he won his first major PDC title at the World Grand Prix and reached the final at the 2013 World Championship. In 2014, at the age of 24, Van Gerwen became the youngest winner of the PDC World Championship, a record he still holds today. He also holds the record for the highest three-dart average in a televised darts match, with 123.40.

Paul Lim Leong Hwa known simply as Paul Lim is a Singaporean professional darts player. He was the first player to hit a perfect 9-dart finish during the Embassy World Darts Championship, which he achieved in 1990 during his second round match against Jack McKenna. Lim won £52,000 for his 9-darter, which was £28,000 more than Phil Taylor won for winning the tournament. John Lowe achieved the first 9-dart finish on television in a match against Keith Deller at the 1984 World Matchplay, for which Lowe won £102,000. Lim's 9-darter remained the only 9-dart game to have been achieved in either version of the world championships, until Raymond van Barneveld hit one against Jelle Klaasen in the quarter-final of the 2009 PDC World Darts Championship. To date, it remains the only 9-dart finish ever achieved at the BDO World Darts Championship.

The 1994 Skol World Darts Championship was held following 18 months of controversy within the sport of darts. After the 1993 Embassy World Championships, several players decided it was time to part company with the British Darts Organisation and form their own organisation. The new organisation was known as the World Darts Council (WDC). The WDC would later become the Professional Darts Corporation (PDC).

Gary Anderson (darts player) Scottish darts player

Gary Anderson is a Scottish professional darts player, currently playing in the Professional Darts Corporation, and a former BDO and WDF world number one. He is a two-time PDC World Champion, having won the title in 2015 and 2016. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest darts players of all time. His nickname is The Flying Scotsman.

The split in darts refers to an acrimonious dispute between top professional darts players and the game's governing body, the British Darts Organisation (BDO), in 1993. The players were discontented by the game's big decline in television coverage in 1989 and the early 1990s, and by what they saw as the BDO's inability to reverse that decline, culminating in 16 top ranked players, including every previous world champion who was still active, breaking away from the BDO to form their own organisation, the World Darts Council (WDC).

Dave Chisnall English darts player

David Chisnall is an English professional darts player from St Helens who plays in Professional Darts Corporation (PDC) events. He began his career participating in the British Darts Organisation (BDO) and was the runner-up in their World Championship in 2010. He switched to the PDC a year later. He has won 15 Pro Tour events. Since his switch to the PDC, Chisnall is probably best known for defeating Phil Taylor in the 2012 World Championship, for reaching the final of the 2013 World Grand Prix where he was beaten 6–0 by Taylor and for reaching the final of the 2014 Grand Slam of Darts, losing a much closer match 16–13, again to Phil Taylor. He is yet to win a major title. He hit his only televised nine-dart finish in the 2015 Grand Slam of Darts against Peter Wright. He has won 15 PDC ranking events. Chisnall's manager is Roger Schena, who often tours with him during tournaments.

Peter Wright (darts player) Scottish darts player

Peter Wright is a Scottish darts player who plays in PDC tournaments. Wright is the reigning PDC World Champion after winning the 2020 PDC World Darts Championship. Wright currently resides in Mendham, Suffolk, England and although he was largely brought up in England he chooses to represent the country of his birth. Before becoming a professional darts player, Wright was a tyre fitter.

The 2013 Ladbrokes World Darts Championship was the 20th World Championship organised by the Professional Darts Corporation since it separated from the British Darts Organisation. The event took place at the Alexandra Palace, London between 14 December 2012 and 1 January 2013.

The 2017 William Hill World Darts Championship was the 24th World Championship organised by the Professional Darts Corporation since it separated from the British Darts Organisation. The event took place at Alexandra Palace in London from 15 December 2016 to 2 January 2017.

The three dart average in darts is the average score achieved with three darts thrown. Averages are the most cited statistics in matches as they give a rough estimate how well the player played. The longer a match game lasts, the harder it is to maintain a high average as low scoring legs or missed darts at a double bring the average down.

Rob Cross (darts player) English professional darts player

Robert Cross is an English professional darts player who plays in Professional Darts Corporation events, and was the 2018 PDC World Darts Champion, following his victory over Phil Taylor. Cross won the World Championship on his debut, having turned professional just 11 months prior to the event. He is currently ranked No. 4 on the PDC world rankings.