World Para Nordic Skiing Championships

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The World Para Nordic Skiing Championships, known before 30 November 2016 as the IPC Biathlon and Cross-Country Skiing World Championships, along with the Winter Paralympic Games, are the most prestigious level of international competition in Paralympic nordic skiing.

Paralympic Games major international sport event for people with disabilities

The Paralympics is a major international multi-sport event involving athletes with a range of disabilities, including impaired muscle power, impaired passive range of movement, limb deficiency, leg length difference, short stature, hypertonia, ataxia, athetosis, vision impairment and intellectual impairment. There are Winter and Summer Paralympic Games, which since the 1988 Summer Games in Seoul, South Korea, are held almost immediately following the respective Olympic Games. All Paralympic Games are governed by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC).

Contents

On 30 November 2016, the International Paralympic Committee, which serves as the international federation for 10 disability sports, including Nordic skiing, adopted the "World Para" brand for all 10 sports. The world championship events in all of these sports were immediately rebranded as "World Para" championships. [1]

International Paralympic Committee global governing body for the paralympic movement

The International Paralympic Committee is an international non-profit organisation and the global governing body for the Paralympic Movement. The IPC organizes the Paralympic Games and functions as the international federation for nine sports. Founded on 22 September 1989 in Düsseldorf, Germany, its mission is "To enable Paralympic athletes to achieve sporting excellence and inspire and excite the world". Furthermore, the IPC wants to promote the Paralympic values and to create sport opportunities for all persons with a disability, from beginner to elite level.

Championships

[2]

EditionYearCityCountryDateNotes
1st1974 ( details ) Grand Bornand Flag of France.svg  France Skiing World Championships - featured alpine (downhill) and Nordic (cross-country) skiing, [3] [4] held by the International Sports Organisation for Disabled (ISOD) [5]
2nd1982 ( details ) Alpes Vaudoise Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland Winter World Championships [5] [6] [7]
3rd1986 ( details ) Sälen Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
4th1990 ( details )JacksonFlag of the United States.svg  United States 5th World Nordic Disabled Championships [8]
5th1996 ( details ) Sunne Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
6th2000 ( details ) Crans Montana Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
7th [9] 2003 ( details ) Mitteltal-Obertal Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
8th2005 ( details ) Fort Kent Flag of the United States.svg  United States 12 Mar – 20 Mar [10]
9th2009 ( details ) Vuokatti Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 23 Jan – 1 Feb [11]
10th2011 ( details ) Khanty-Mansiysk Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 31 Mar – 10 Apr
11th2013 ( details ) Sollefteå Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 25 February - 5 March
12th2015 ( details ) Cable, Wisconsin Flag of the United States.svg  United States 22 Jan – 1 Feb [12]
13th2017 ( details ) Finsterau Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 10 – 19 Feb [13] First World Championships under "World Para" branding.

See also

Biathlon has been contested at the Winter Paralympic Games since the Winter Games in 1988, in Innsbruck, Austria.

Cross-country skiing has been contested at the Winter Paralympic Games since the first Winter Games in 1976.

The first Biathlon World Championships (BWCH) was held in 1958, with individual and team contests for men. The number of events has grown significantly over the years. Beginning in 1984, women biathletes had their own World Championships, and finally, from 1989, both genders have been participating in joint BWCHs. In 1978 the development was enhanced by the change from the large army rifle calibre to a small bore rifle, while the range to the target was reduced from 150 to 50 meters.

Related Research Articles

World Para Alpine Skiing Championships

The World Para Alpine Skiing Championships, known before the 2017 edition as the IPC Alpine Skiing World Championships, along with the Winter Paralympic Games, are the most prestigious level of international competition in Paralympic alpine skiing. First held in 1974, the World Championships have been held every four years from 198? to 2004; beginning in 2009, they have been held every other year, in odd-numbered years.

Winter Paralympic Games international multi-sport event where athletes with physical disabilities compete in snow & ice sports

The Winter Paralympic Games is an international multi-sport event where athletes with physical disabilities compete in snow & ice sports. This includes athletes with mobility disabilities, amputations, blindness, and cerebral palsy. The Winter Paralympic Games are held every four years directly following the Winter Olympic Games. The Winter Paralympics are also hosted by the city that hosted the Winter Olympics. The International Paralympic Committee (IPC) oversees the Winter Paralympics. Medals are awarded in each event: with gold medals for first place, silver for second and bronze for third, following the tradition that the Olympic Games started in 1904.

2010 Winter Paralympics medal table medal table

The 2010 Winter Paralympics, officially known as the X Paralympic Winter Games, were held in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, from March 12 to March 21, 2010. A total of 506 athletes from 44 nations participated in 64 events from five different sport disciplines.

Robin McKeever Canadian biathlete

Robin McKeever is a Canadian cross country skier, sighted guide, Paralympian and Olympian.

2011 IPC Biathlon and Cross-Country Skiing World Championships

The 2011 IPC Biathlon and Cross-Country Skiing World Championships took place 2–11 April 2011 in Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia. IPC stands for International Paralympic Committee. This was the first time these championships were hosted in Russia, and the first time the championships were hosted in the same city as the IBU Biathlon World Championships which was held in Khanty-Mansiysk from March 3 to March 13, 2011.

Para-Nordic skiing classification

Para-Nordic skiing classification is the classification system for para-Nordic skiing which includes the biathlon and cross country events. The classifications for Para-Nordic skiing mirrors the classifications for Para-Alpine skiing with some exceptions. A functional mobility and medical classification is in use, with skiers being divided into three groups: standing skiers, sit skiers and visually impaired skiers. International classification is governed by International Paralympic Committee, Nordic Skiing (IPC-NS). Other classification is handled by national bodies. Before the IPC-NS took over classification, a number of organizations handled classification based on the type of disability.

LW12 is a para-Alpine and para-Nordic sit skiing sport class defined by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC). An LW12 skier needs to meet a minimum of one of several conditions including a single below knee but above ankle amputation, monoplegia that exhibits similar to below knee amputation, legs of different length where there is at least a 7 centimetres difference, combined muscle strength in the lower extremities less than 71. For international competitions, classification is done through IPC Alpine Skiing or IPC Nordic Skiing. For sub-international competitions, classification is done by a national federation such as Alpine Canada. For para-Alpine, this class is subdivided into two subclasses.: LW12.1 and LW12.2. A new sit-skier competitor with only national classification will compete as LW12.2 in international competitions until they have been internationally classified.

LW11

LW11 is a para-Alpine and para-Nordic sit skiing sport class, a classification defined by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC for people with paralysis in the lower extremities and people with cerebral palsy that affects the lower half of the body. Outside of skiing, the competitor in this class is unable to walk. For international competitions, classification is done through IPC Alpine Skiing or IPC Nordic Skiing. For sub-international competitions, classification is done by a national federation such as Alpine Canada.

LW10 sit-skiing classification for disabled skiers

LW10 is a para-Alpine and para-Nordic sit-skiing classification for skiers who cannot sit up without support. For international skiing competitions, classification is conducted by International Paralympic Committee (IPC) Alpine Skiing and IPC Nordic Skiing, while national federations such as Alpine Canada handle classification for domestic competitions.

LW1 (classification)

LW1 is a para-Alpine standing skiing classification for people with severe lower extreme disabilities in both extremities. It includes both skiers with amputations and cerebral palsy. International classification is done through International Paralympic Committee Alpine Skiing, and national classification through local national sport federations. LW1 classified skiers use outriggers, and two skis or one ski with a prosthesis. Other equipment is used during training such as ski-tips, ski-bras, and short skis.

LW2 (classification)

LW2 is a para-Alpine and para-Nordic standing ski sport class defined by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC). Competitors in this class have severe disability in a lower limb, which may be a result of an amputation, or arthrodesis in the leg and hip. Depending on the type of skiing, the international classification process for LW2 skiers is handled by the IPC Alpine Skiing Technical Committee and IPC Nordic Skiing Technical Committee. National sport federations handle classification on the lower levels.

LW3 is a para-Alpine and para-Nordic standing skiing sport class defined by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) for skiers with a disability affecting both legs, with double below knee amputation or a combined strength total for both legs of 60, with 80 as the baseline for people without disabilities. For international skiing competitions, classification is done through IPC Alpine Skiing or IPC Nordic Skiing. The classification has two subclasses for para-Alpine skiing: LW3.1 which is for people with double below the knee amputations or similar disabilities, and LW3.2 which is for people with cerebral palsy that involves moderate athetoid, moderate ataxic impairment or slight diplegic involvement.

LW4 is a para-Alpine and para-Nordic standing skiing sport class defined by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) for skiers who may have a disability in one lower extremity, which may be a result of a leg amputation below the knee, knee arthrodesis or a hip arthrodesis. For international skiing competitions, classification is done through IPC Alpine Skiing or IPC Nordic Skiing. A national federation such as Alpine Canada handles classification for domestic competitions.

LW5/7 is a standing para-Alpine and para-Nordic skiing classification for skiers with upper extremity issues in both limbs that may include double amputation of both arms and hands or dysmelia of the upper limbs. The class has three subclasses defined by the location of the disability on the upper extremities. International classification is done by IPC Alpine Skiing and IPC Nordic Skiing. On the national level, classification is handled by national sports federation such as Cross-Country Canada.

LW6/8

LW6/8 is a para-Alpine and para-Nordic standing skiing sport class, a classification defined by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) for people with an upper extremity issue who have paralysis, motor paresis affecting one arm, a single upper arm amputation or CP8 classified cerebral palsy. LW6/8 skiers use two skis and one pole in both para-Alpine and para-Nordic skiing.

LW9 is a para-Alpine and para-Nordic standing skiing sport class, a classification defined by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) for people with upper and lower limb function problems, and includes cerebral palsy skiers classified CP5, CP6 and CP7, along with people with hemiplegia or amputations. For international skiing competitions, classification is done through IPC Alpine Skiing or IPC Nordic Skiing. A national federation such as Alpine Canada handles classification for domestic competitions. This classification is separated into two subclasses including LW9.1 and LW9.2.

Christopher "Chris" Klebl is an American-Canadian cross-country skier who represented the United States at the 2006 and 2010 Winter Paralympics before winning a gold medal for Canada at the 2014 Winter Paralympics.

Mark Arendz is a Canadian biathlon and Para-Nordic skier. He was disabled at the age of seven when his arm got caught in the blades of a grain auger. He participated in the 2010, 2014 and 2018 Winter Paralympics and won 8 medals in total, including gold in the men's 15km biathlon standing at the 2018 games.

References

  1. "The IPC to rebrand the 10 sports it acts as International Federation for" (Press release). International Paralympic Committee. 30 November 2016. Retrieved 13 December 2016.
  2. The IPC, Official site of the 2009 IPC Biathlon and Cross-Country Skiing World Championships and the 2009 IPC Biathlon and Cross-Country Skiing World Cup
  3. Athens Education Material - Paralympic Games - From 1960 to 2004, Malaysian Paralympic Council
  4. Winter Paralympic History, HockeyCanada.ca
  5. 1 2 Paralympic Winter Sports Programme Build-up Archived 2010-07-07 at the Wayback Machine , The Paralympian 1/2002, International Paralympic Committee (IPC)
  6. Canadian disabled team shines at winter games, The Vancouver Sun - Mar 15, 1982
  7. Important Dates in Sledge Hockey History, hockeycanada.ca
  8. 5th World Nordic Disabled Championships, prall-statistik.de
  9. Nordic Skiing, The Paralympian Newsletter 4/2002, International Paralympic Committee (IPC)
  10. Nordic Skiing World Championships To Begin in Maine, International Paralympic Committee (IPC), March 11, 2005
  11. Vuokatti Prepares for IPC Biathlon & Cross-Country Skiing World Champs, International Paralympic Committee (IPC), January 19, 2009
  12. Cable 2015
  13. Finsterau 2017