ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships

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The ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships (WSSC) are the world championships for the sport of synchronized skating. Held since 2000, the World Synchronized Skating Championships is an annual event organized by the International Skating Union and attracts the most elite senior-level synchronized skating teams from around the world to compete for the World Championship.

A world championship is generally an international competition open to elite competitors from around the world, representing their nations, and winning such an event will be considered the highest or near highest achievement in the sport, game, or ability.

Synchronized skating

Synchronized skating is a sport where between eight and sixteen figure skaters perform together as a team. They move as a flowing unit at high speed over the ice, while completing complicated footwork. Synchronized skating grew rapidly in the late 20th and early 21st centuries and today there are approximately 600 synchro teams in the United States alone.

International Skating Union international sport governing body

The International Skating Union (ISU) is the international governing body for competitive ice skating disciplines, including figure skating, synchronized skating, speed skating, and short track speed skating. It was founded in Scheveningen, Netherlands, in July 1892, making it one of the oldest international sport federations. The ISU was formed to establish standardized international rules and regulations for the skating disciplines it governs, and to organize international competitions in these disciplines. It is now based in Lausanne, Switzerland.

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Since the beginning, the top positions have been mainly dominated by Sweden and Finland: the Swedish Team Surprise have won six World titles, four silver medals and one bronze medal and the Finnish Marigold IceUnity are five-time World Champions with four silver medals and two bronze medals. Rockettes from Finland have earned three World titles, two silver medals and three bronze medals. Other major teams include the Canadian NEXXICE with two World titles, three silvers and two bronzes, the Russian Team Paradise with 2 World titles and 2 bronze, the Finnish Team Unique with one gold and one silver, as well as the American teams, Miami University and the Haydenettes with one silver and four bronze medals, respectively. Other medalists include the (now-discontinued) Canadian black ice with one silver medal and two bronze medals, the Canadian Les Suprêmes with one bronze medal.

Sweden constitutional monarchy in Northern Europe

Sweden, formal name: the Kingdom of Sweden, is a Scandinavian Nordic country in Northern Europe. It borders Norway to the west and north and Finland to the east, and is connected to Denmark in the southwest by a bridge-tunnel across the Öresund, a strait at the Swedish-Danish border. At 450,295 square kilometres (173,860 sq mi), Sweden is the largest country in Northern Europe, the third-largest country in the European Union and the fifth largest country in Europe by area. Sweden has a total population of 10.2 million of which 2.5 million have a foreign background. It has a low population density of 22 inhabitants per square kilometre (57/sq mi). The highest concentration is in the southern half of the country.

Finland Republic in Northern Europe

Finland, officially the Republic of Finland, is a country in Northern Europe bordering the Baltic Sea, Gulf of Bothnia, and Gulf of Finland, between Norway to the north, Sweden to the northwest, and Russia to the east. Finland is a Nordic country and is situated in the geographical region of Fennoscandia. The capital and largest city is Helsinki. Other major cities are Espoo, Vantaa, Tampere, Oulu and Turku.

Team Surprise synchronized skating team from Sweden

Team Surprise were a senior synchronized skating team from Sweden. Established in 1985, they were the world's most successful team with six world championships and 12 medals in total, placing off podium only in 2010, 2011, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, and 2017.

Although initially dominated by just a handful of teams and countries, the sport has arguably become more competitive over time; as supported by an analysis of the point 'gap' between the 1st and 10th placed teams. Starting from the 2005 WSSC (the first year the current ISU Judging System was introduced), the point 'gap' has tended to decrease over time:

The ISU Judging System, occasionally referred to as the Code of Points (COP) system, is the scoring system currently used to judge the figure skating disciplines of men's and ladies' singles, pair skating, ice dance, and synchronized skating. It was designed and implemented by the International Skating Union (ISU), the ruling body of the sport. This system of scoring is used in all international competitions sanctioned by the ISU, including the Olympic Games. The ISU Judging System replaced the previous 6.0 system in 2004. This new system was created in response to the 2002 Winter Olympics figure skating scandal, in an attempt to make the scoring system more objective and less vulnerable to abuse.

WSSC (year)1st vs. 10th place (∆ points)
200585.27 [1]
200677.56 [2]
200777.03 [3]
200863.06 [4]
200948.02 [5]
201056.42 [6]
201152.69 [7]
201238.32 [8]
201355.12 [9]
201456.32 [10]
201550.39 [11]
201653.32 [12]
201753.41 [13]
201840.03 [14]
201963.20 [15]

Medalists

YearLocationGoldTotal SP FS SilverTotal SP FS BronzeTotal SP FS Source(s)
2000 Flag of the United States.svg Minneapolis, United States Flag of Sweden.svg Team Surprise 1.50.51.0 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg black ice 3.01.02.0 Flag of Finland.svg Marigold IceUnity 4.51.53.0 [16] [17]
2001 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland Flag of Sweden.svg Team Surprise 1.50.51.0 Flag of Finland.svg Rockettes 4.02.02.0 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg black ice 4.01.03.0 [17]
2002 Flag of France.svg Rouen, France Flag of Finland.svg Marigold IceUnity 2.01.01.0 Flag of Sweden.svg Team Surprise 2.50.52.0 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg black ice 4.51.53.0 [18]
2003 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Ottawa, Canada Flag of Sweden.svg Team Surprise 2.01.01.0 Flag of Finland.svg Marigold IceUnity 3.51.52.0 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Les Suprêmes 3.50.53.0 [19]
2004 Flag of Croatia.svg Zagreb, Croatia Flag of Finland.svg Marigold IceUnity 1.50.51.0 Flag of Sweden.svg Team Surprise 3.01.02.0 Flag of Finland.svg Rockettes 4.51.53.0 [20]
2005 Flag of Sweden.svg Gothenburg, Sweden Flag of Sweden.svg Team Surprise 207.7571.23136.02 Flag of Finland.svg Rockettes 188.4064.33124.07 Flag of Finland.svg Marigold IceUnity 187.1768.67118.50 [1]
2006 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Prague, Czech Republic Flag of Finland.svg Marigold IceUnity 197.2969.89127.40 Flag of Sweden.svg Team Surprise 188.5769.09119.48 Flag of Finland.svg Rockettes 180.3262.66117.66 [2]
2007 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg London, Canada Flag of Sweden.svg Team Surprise 222.2477.54144.70 Flag of the United States.svg Miami University 198.7169.75128.96 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg NEXXICE 194.0868.54125.54 [3]
2008 Flag of Hungary.svg Budapest, Hungary Flag of Finland.svg Rockettes 210.4872.55137.93 Flag of Sweden.svg Team Surprise 205.7174.72130.99 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg NEXXICE 198.8170.67128.14 [4]
2009 Flag of Croatia.svg Zagreb, Croatia Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg NEXXICE 223.5880.12143.46 Flag of Finland.svg Team Unique 220.2882.36137.92 Flag of Sweden.svg Team Surprise 209.3078.24131.06 [5]
2010 Flag of the United States.svg Colorado Springs, United States Flag of Finland.svg Rockettes 223.9081.40142.50 Flag of Finland.svg Marigold IceUnity 216.9875.34141.64 Flag of the United States.svg Haydenettes 216.4878.62137.86 [6]
2011 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland Flag of Finland.svg Rockettes 215.4374.81140.62 Flag of Finland.svg Marigold IceUnity 213.4873.54139.94 Flag of the United States.svg Haydenettes 205.4071.16134.24 [7]
2012 Flag of Sweden.svg Gothenburg, Sweden Flag of Sweden.svg Team Surprise 194.8764.63130.24 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg NEXXICE 193.6463.76129.88 Flag of the United States.svg Haydenettes 192.7862.14130.64 [8]
2013 Flag of the United States.svg Boston, United States Flag of Finland.svg Team Unique 208.7769.28139.49 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg NEXXICE 208.2572.84135.41 Flag of the United States.svg Haydenettes 202.5371.87130.66 [9]
2014 Flag of Italy.svg Courmayeur, Italy Flag of Finland.svg Marigold IceUnity 223.4576.14147.31 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg NEXXICE 220.8874.85146.03 Flag of Finland.svg Rockettes 220.6674.98145.68 [10]
2015 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Hamilton, Canada Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg NEXXICE 214.7371.06143.67 Flag of Finland.svg Marigold IceUnity 214.0670.39143.67 Flag of Russia.svg Paradise 203.4866.25137.23 [11]
2016 Flag of Hungary.svg Budapest, Hungary Flag of Russia.svg Paradise 212.6973.86138.83 Flag of Finland.svg Rockettes 207.8470.03137.81 Flag of the United States.svg Haydenettes 206.9568.09138.86 [12]
2017 Flag of the United States.svg Colorado Springs, USA Flag of Russia.svg Paradise 208.7072.62136.08 Flag of Finland.svg Marigold IceUnity 208.5870.88137.70 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg NEXXICE 197.5467.17130.37 [13]
2018 Flag of Sweden.svg Stockholm, Sweden Flag of Finland.svg Marigold IceUnity 209.0272.61136.41 Flag of Sweden.svg Team Surprise 207.9972.83135.16 Flag of Russia.svg Paradise 200.9776.05124.92
2019 Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki, Finland Flag of Russia.svg Paradise 234.3887.12147.26 Flag of Finland.svg Marigold IceUnity 228.7085.90142.80 Flag of Finland.svg Rockettes 228.6182.12146.49
2020 Flag of the United States.svg Lake Placid, NY, USA To be held on 3 - 5 April 2020
2021 Flag of Croatia.svg Zagreb, Croatia To be held on 8 - 10 April 2021
2022 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Hamilton, ON, Canada To be held on 7 - 9 April 2022

Summary

Medals by country
RankTeamGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 Flag of Finland.svg Finland910625
2 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden65112
3 Flag of Russia.svg Russia3025
4 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Canada24612
5 Flag of the United States.svg United States0156
Medals by team
RankTeamGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 Flag of Sweden.svg Team Surprise65112
2 Flag of Finland.svg Marigold IceUnity56213
3 Flag of Finland.svg Rockettes33410
4 Flag of Russia.svg Paradise3025
5 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg NEXXICE2338
6 Flag of Finland.svg Team Unique1102
7 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg black ice0123
8 Flag of the United States.svg Miami University0101
9 Flag of the United States.svg Haydenettes0055
10 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Les Suprêmes0011

See also

The ISU World Junior Synchronized Skating Championships (WJSSC) are the junior world championships for the sport of synchronized skating. Held first time in 2013 and originally planned to be held biennially, the WJSSC is now an annual event sanctioned by the International Skating Union.

Related Research Articles

Laura Lepistö Finnish figure skater

Laura Anneli Lepistö is a Finnish former competitive figure skater. She is the 2010 world bronze medalist, the 2009 European champion, and a two-time Finnish national champion.

NEXXICE synchronized skating team

NEXXICE is the name for synchronized skating teams representing Burlington Skating Centre from Burlington, Ontario, Canada. Their senior team are ten-time Canadian national champions (2007–17), the first Canadian team to win the World Championships (2009), and again in 2015. They are 2012–14 World silver medalists and 2007–08 & 2016-17 World bronze medalists.

Marigold IceUnity senior-level synchronized skating team

Marigold IceUnity are a senior-level synchronized skating team from Helsinki, Finland, representing the figure skating club Helsingin Luistelijat. Coached by Anu Oksanen and Tiina Turunen, they are four-time World Champions and currently ranked first in the world by the International Skating Union. They are the current world champions (2018).

black ice were a synchronized skating team from Canada. Their senior team were three-time medalists at the World Championships and eight-time Canadian national champions. The team was founded by Cathy Dalton and Susan Pettes. On October 20, 2010, black ice announced they were retiring. Their junior team won the 2006 French Cup and was 5th at Junior World Challenge Cup that same year. black ice also appeared on the Canadian reality show Say Yes & Marry Me! in 2003, where they helped a man propose to his girlfriend.

Haydenettes senior-level synchronized skating team

The Haydenettes are a senior-level synchronized skating team representing Hayden Figure Skating Club. They are five-time bronze medalists at the World Synchronized Skating Championships, earning the title in 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2016. Formed in 1979 by Lynn Benson, the Haydenettes are the most successful synchronized skating team in U.S. history, with 26 U.S. National titles.

Rockettes (synchronized skating team) senior-level synchronized skating team

Helsinki Rockettes are a senior-level synchronized skating team from Helsinki, Finland, representing the figure skating club Helsingin Taitoluisteluklubi. They are one of the most successful teams in the world with three World Championships and they are ten-time Finnish champions.

Team Unique senior-level synchronized skating team

Team Unique are a senior-level synchronized skating team from Helsinki, Finland, representing the figure skating club Helsingfors Skridskoklubb (HSK). Established in 1993 and competing at the senior level since 1996, Team Unique are the 2013 world champions, 2009 world silver medalists and the 2013 and 2016 Finnish champions. Currently, they are ranked seventh in the world by the International Skating Union. The team's home club, HSK, is also the home club to the junior team Team Mystique.

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Musketeers are a junior-level synchronized skating team representing the figure skating club Helsingin Luistelijat, based in Helsinki, Finland.

The 2009–10 synchronized skating season began on July 1, 2009, and ended on June 30, 2010. During this season, which was concurrent with the season for the other four disciplines, elite synchronized skating teams competed on the International Skating Union (ISU) Championship level at the 2010 Senior World Championships and Junior World Challenge Cup. They also competed at various other international as well as national synchronized skating competitions.

Team Fintastic are a junior-level synchronized skating team from Helsinki, Finland, representing the figure skating club Helsingin Taitoluisteluklubi. They are one of the most successful junior teams in the world, with the silver medal at the 2013 World Junior Championships and eight victories at the Junior World Challenge Cup, with seven consecutive victories from 2007 to 2014.

The 2006–07 synchronized skating season began on July 1, 2006, and ended on June 30, 2007. During this season, which was concurrent with the season for the other four disciplines, elite synchronized skating teams competed on the International Skating Union (ISU) Championship level at the 2007 World Championships and Junior World Challenge Cup. They also competed at various other international as well as national synchronized skating competitions.

Team Mystique are a junior-level synchronized skating team from Helsinki, Finland, representing the figure skating club Helsingfors Skridskoklubb. The club is also home to the senior team, Team Unique. They have placed second twice at the Junior World Challenge Cup.

Les Suprêmes is the senior-level synchronized skating team representing the figure skating club Club de Patinage Artistique de Saint-Léonard in Montréal, Quebec, Canada. CPA St-Léonard fields teams, all named Les Suprêmes, at five levels: elementary, juvenile, novice, junior and senior.

Paradise (synchronized skating team) synchronized skating team from Russia

Paradise are a senior-level synchronized skating team representing Russia. Currently, they are ranked first in the world by the International Skating Union. They are three-times World Champions, they claimed the 2015 World Championships bronze medals, and they are the 1999-2017 Russian National Champions.

The 2004–05 synchronized skating season began on July 1, 2004, and ended on June 30, 2005. During this season, which was concurrent with the season for the other four disciplines, elite synchronized skating teams competed on the International Skating Union (ISU) Championship level at the 2005 World Championships and Junior World Challenge Cup. They also competed at various other international as well as national synchronized skating competitions.

References

  1. 1 2 The first two sites show the official 2005 WSSC results, the third is an Yle news article:
    • "Senior Teams - Short Program". International Skating Union. 2005-04-22. Retrieved 2014-04-07.
    • "Senior Teams - Free Skating". International Skating Union. 2005-04-23. Retrieved 2014-04-07.
    • "MM-muodostelmaluistelusta hopea ja pronssi" [Silver and bronze at Synchro Worlds] (in Finnish). Yle. Suomen Tietotoimisto. 2005-04-23. Retrieved 2014-04-07.
  2. 1 2 The first two sites show the official 2006 WSSC results, the third is an Yle news article:
  3. 1 2 The first two sites show the official 2007 WSSC results, the third is a Helsingin Sanomat news article:
  4. 1 2 The first two sites show the official 2008 WSSC results, the third is a Savon Sanomat news article:
  5. 1 2 The first two sites show the official 2009 WSSC results, the third is a Helsingin Sanomat news article:
  6. 1 2 The first two sites show the official 2010 WSSC results, the third is a Helsingin Sanomat news article and the fourth is a U.S. Figure Skating news article:
  7. 1 2 The first two sites show the official 2011 WSSC results, the third is an Iltalehti news article:
  8. 1 2 The first two sites show the official 2012 WSSC results, the third is an Yle news article:
  9. 1 2 The first two sites show the official 2013 WSSC results, the third is an Ice Network news article:
  10. 1 2 The first three sites show the official 2014 WSSC results, the fourth is an article by the Finnish Figure Skating Association about the competition:
  11. 1 2 The first two sites show the official 2015 WSSC results, the third is an ISU news article:
  12. 1 2 "2016 ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships". International Skating Union. Retrieved 2016-04-10.
  13. 1 2 "2017 ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships". International Skating Union. Retrieved 2017-04-12.
  14. "2018 ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships". International Skating Union. Retrieved 2018-04-09.
  15. "2000 World Synchronized Skating Championships". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2014-04-07.
  16. 1 2 The first two sites show the official 2001 WSSC results, the third is an Yle news article:
  17. The first two sites show the official 2002 WSSC results, the third is an Yle news article:
  18. The first two sites show the official 2003 WSSC results, the third is a Kaleva news article:
  19. The first two sites show the official 2004 WSSC results, the third is a Kaleva news article: