FIS Nordic World Ski Championships

Last updated

FIS Nordic World Ski Championships
FIS World Ski Championships Gold Medal.jpg
Gold medal
Statusactive
Genresporting event
Date(s)February–March
Frequencybiennial (since 1985)
Location(s)various
Inaugurated1925 (1925)
Organised by FIS

The FIS Nordic World Ski Championships is a biannial nordic skiing event organized by the International Ski Federation (FIS). The World Championships was started in 1925 for men and opened for women's participation in 1954. World Championship events include nordic skiing's three disciplines: cross-country skiing, ski jumping, and nordic combined (the latter being a combination sport consisting of both cross-country and ski jumping). From 1924 to 1939, the World Championships were held every year, including the Winter Olympics. After World War II, the World Championships were held every four years from 1950 to 1982. Since 1985, the World Championships have been held in odd-numbered years.

Nordic skiing skiing variation

Nordic skiing encompasses the various types of skiing in which the toe of the ski boot is fixed to the binding in a manner that allows the heel to rise off the ski, unlike Alpine skiing, where the boot is attached to the ski from toe to heel. Recreational disciplines include cross-country skiing and Telemark skiing.

International Ski Federation international governing body for ski sports

The Fédération Internationale de Ski is the world's highest governing body for international winter sports. Founded in Chamonix on 2 February 1924, it is responsible for the Olympic disciplines of Alpine skiing, cross-country skiing, ski jumping, Nordic combined, freestyle skiing and snowboarding. The FIS is also responsible for setting the international competition rules. The organization now has a membership of 118 national ski associations and is based in Oberhofen am Thunersee, Switzerland.

Cross-country skiing (sport) competitive winter sport category

The sport of cross-country skiing encompasses a variety of formats for cross-country skiing races over courses of varying lengths according to rules sanctioned by the International Ski Federation and by various national organizations, such as the U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association (USSA) and Cross Country Ski Canada. International competitions include the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships, the FIS Cross-Country World Cup, and at the Winter Olympic Games. Such races occur over homologated, groomed courses designed to support classic (in-track) and freestyle events, where the skiers may employ skate skiing. It also encompasses cross-country ski marathon events, sanctioned by the Worldloppet Ski Federation, and cross-country ski orienteering events, sanctioned by the International Orienteering Federation. Related forms of competition are biathlon, where competitors race on cross-country skis and stop to shoot at targets with rifles, and paralympic cross-country skiing that allows athletes with disabilities to compete at cross-country skiing with adaptive equipment.

Contents

History

The International Ski Federation arranged annual Rendezvous races from 1925 to 1927 and annual FIS races from 1929 to 1935. At the FIS congress in 1936, it was decided that the first World Championships should be held in 1937 and take place in Chamonix, France. [1] All Rendezvous and FIS races were given official World Championship status at FIS' 25th congress in 1965. [2] This decision ment that the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 1925 in Janské Lázně, Czechoslovakia, were given status as the first official World Championships.

Chamonix Commune in Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, France

Chamonix-Mont-Blanc, more commonly known as Chamonix, is a commune in the Haute-Savoie département in the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region in south-eastern France. It was the site of the first Winter Olympics in 1924.

France Republic with mainland in Europe and numerous oversea territories

France, officially the French Republic, is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France in Western Europe and several overseas regions and territories. The metropolitan area of France extends from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea, and from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean. It is bordered by Belgium, Luxembourg and Germany to the northeast, Switzerland and Italy to the east, and Andorra and Spain to the south. The overseas territories include French Guiana in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans. The country's 18 integral regions span a combined area of 643,801 square kilometres (248,573 sq mi) and a total population of 67.3 million. France, a sovereign state, is a unitary semi-presidential republic with its capital in Paris, the country's largest city and main cultural and commercial centre. Other major urban areas include Lyon, Marseille, Toulouse, Bordeaux, Lille and Nice.

The FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 1925 was the 1st official FIS Nordic World Ski Championships and took place between February 4–14, 1925 in Johannisbad, Czechoslovakia.

The FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 1941 were declared a non-World Championship event by FIS at the 16th FIS congress in 1946 [3] and their results have been struck from the official records.

The FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 1941 took place February 1–10, 1941 in Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy. The previous championships of 1940 were scheduled for Norway, but were cancelled in the wake of Germany's invasion of Norway during World War II. At the 1946 meeting in Pau, France, the FIS declared this a non-event because of the limited number of competitors. Medals were awarded in this event, but not counted in the overall FIS Nordic World Ski Championships as a result.

The 1980 and 1984 World Championships consisted of a total of only three events; women's 20 km cross-country (1980), ski jumping team event and nordic combined team event (both 1984). These events were not held in the 1980 and 1984 Winter Olympics and therefore got their own World Championships.

The FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 1980 in cross-country skiing took place in Falun, Sweden on 8 March 1980. This was an extraordinary event because the women's 20 km event was not held at the Winter Olympics in Lake Placid.

The FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 1984 for teams in Ski jumping and Nordic combined took place in Engelberg, Switzerland and Rovaniemi, Finland. These were extraordinary events because both were not held at the 1984 Winter Olympics in Sarajevo.

1984 Winter Olympics 14th edition of Winter Olympics, held in Sarajevo (Yugoslavia) in 1984

The 1984 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIV Olympic Winter Games, was a winter multi-sport event which took place from 8–19 February 1984 in Sarajevo, SFR Yugoslavia, in present-day Bosnia and Herzegovina. Other candidate cities were Sapporo, Japan; and Gothenburg, Sweden.

Historical notes

  1. In the years 1925–1927, the FIS referred to these events as Rendezvous races. During the periods of 1929–1931 and 1933–1935, the FIS referred to these events as FIS races. This event has been officially referred to as the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships since 1937.
  2. The FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 1941 were declared a non-event by the FIS at their 1946 meeting and their results have been struck from the official records.
  3. The FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 1980 consisted of a women's 20 km cross-country event because it was not included in the program of the Winter Olympics at Lake Placid.
  4. The FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 1984 consisted of team events in both ski jumping and Nordic combined held at separate locations because neither event was included in the program of the Winter Olympics in Sarajevo.

The following list shows when new events were added for the first time:

Mass start type of start in some sports

Mass start is a format of starting in some racing sports such as long-distance running in athletics, speed skating, long-distance cross-country skiing and biathlon.

List of championships

#YearLocationDateVenueCountryTop NationEventsNotes
1 1925 Janské Lázně 4 – 14 FebFlag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia 4Denoted Rendezvous races
2 1926 Lahti 4 – 6 Feb Salpausselkä Flag of Finland.svg  Finland Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 4Denoted Rendezvous races
3 1927 Cortina d'Ampezzo 2 – 5 Feb Trampolino Olimpico Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Italy Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 4Denoted FIS races
4 1929 Zakopane 5 – 9 FebFlag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 4Denoted FIS races
5 1930 Oslo 27 Feb – 1 Mar Holmenkollen Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 4
6 1931 Oberhof 13 – 15 FebFlag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 4
7 1933 Innsbruck 8 – 12 FebFlag of Austria.svg  Austria Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 5Denoted FIS races. First with cross-country relay
8 1934 Sollefteå 20 – 25 Feb Hallstaberget Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 5Denoted FIS races
9 1935 Vysoké Tatry 13 – 18 FebFlag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia (2)Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 5Denoted FIS races
10 1937 Chamonix 12 – 28 Feb Tremplin Olympique / Stade Olympique Flag of France.svg  France Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 5First official FIS Nordic World Ski Championships
11 1938 Lahti (2)24 – 28 Feb Salpausselkä Flag of Finland.svg  Finland (2)Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 5
12 1939 Zakopane (2)11 – 19 FebFlag of Poland.svg  Poland (2)Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 5
1941 Cortina d'Ampezzo (2)1 – 10 Feb Trampolino Olimpico Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Italy (2)Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 5Declared unofficial in 1946
13 1950 Lake Placid (SJ)
Rumford (XC)
1 – 6 Feb Intervales
Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 5First championship outside Europe
14 1954 Falun 13 – 21 Feb Lugnet Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden (2)Flag of the Soviet Union (1936-1955).svg  Soviet Union 8First championship with women
15 1958 Lahti (3)1 – 9 Mar Salpausselkä Flag of Finland.svg  Finland (3)Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 8
16 1962 Zakopane (3)18 – 25 FebFlag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland (3)Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 10First with normal hill
17 1966 Oslo (2)17 – 27 Feb Holmenkollen Flag of Norway.svg  Norway (2)Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 10
18 1970 Vysoké Tatry (2)14 – 22 Feb Štrbské pleso Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia (3)Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 10
19 1974 Falun (2)16 – 24 Feb Lugnet Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden (3)Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 10
20 1978 Lahti (4)18 – 26 Feb Salpausselkä Flag of Finland.svg  Finland (4)Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 11
21 1980 Falun (3)8 Mar Lugnet Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden (4)Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 1 [4] Non-Olympic event
22 1982 Oslo (3)19 – 28 Feb Holmenkollen Flag of Norway.svg  Norway (3)Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 13First with team large hill/Nordic combined relay
23 1984 Engelberg (SJ)
Rovaniemi (NC)
26 Feb
17 Mar
Gross-Titlis-Schanze
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland (5)
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 2 [5] Non-Olympic events
24 1985 Seefeld 16 – 27 Jan Seefeld Nordic Competence Centre /
Bergiselschanze in Innsbruck
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria (2)Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 13
25 1987 Oberstdorf 12 – 21 Feb Schattenberg Ski Jump / Birgsautal Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany (2)Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 13
26 1989 Lahti (5)17 – 26 Feb Salpausselkä Flag of Finland.svg  Finland (6)Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 15
27 1991 Val di Fiemme 7 – 17 Feb Lago di Tesero / Trampolino dal Ben Flag of Italy.svg  Italy (3)Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 15First with 10 km cross-country (men)
28 1993 Falun (4)19 – 28 Feb Lugnet Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden (5)Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 15First with pursuit
29 1995 Thunder Bay 9 – 19 Mar Big Thunder Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 15
30 1997 Trondheim 21 Feb – 2 Mar Granåsen Ski Centre Flag of Norway.svg  Norway (4)Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 15
31 1999 Ramsau 19 – 28 Feb Ramsau am Dachstein /
Paul-Ausserleitner-Schanze in Bischofshofen
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria (3)Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 16First with 10 km/large hill
32 2001 Lahti (6)15 – 25 Feb Salpausselkä Flag of Finland.svg  Finland (7)Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 19First with team normal hill; first with sprint
33 2003 Val di Fiemme (2)18 Feb – 1 Mar Lago di Tesero / Trampolino dal Ben Flag of Italy.svg  Italy (4)Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 18
34 2005 Oberstdorf (2)16 – 27 Feb Schattenberg Ski Jump / Ried Flag of Germany.svg  Germany (3)Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 19First with team sprint
35 2007 Sapporo 22 Feb – 4 Mar Miyanomori / Okurayama /
Shirahatayama / Sapporo Dome
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 18
36 2009 Liberec 18 Feb – 1 Mar Ještěd / Vesec Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic (4)Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 20First with ski jumping for women; only with Nordic combined mass start
37 2011 Oslo (4)23 Feb – 6 Mar Holmenkollen Flag of Norway.svg  Norway (5)Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 21First with Nordic combined normal hill relay
38 2013 Val di Fiemme (3)20 Feb – 3 Mar Lago di Tesero / Trampolino dal Ben Flag of Italy.svg  Italy (5)Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 21First with mixed team ski jumping

First with Nordic combined large hill Team Sprint

39 2015 Falun (5)18 Feb – 1 Mar Lugnet Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden (6)Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 21
40 2017 Lahti (7)22 Feb – 5 Mar Salpausselkä Flag of Finland.svg  Finland (8)Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 21
41 2019 Seefeld (2)20 Feb – 3 Mar Seefeld Nordic Competence Centre /
Bergiselschanze in Innsbruck
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria (4)Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 22First with women's team ski jumping
42 2021 Oberstdorf (3)23 Feb – 7 Mar Schattenberg Ski Jump / Ried Flag of Germany.svg  Germany (4)TBD
43 2023 Planica TBD Planica Nordic Centre Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia TBD

Medalists by sport

Medal table

Table updated after the 2019 Championships.

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 146109112367
2Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 637068201
3Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 464746139
4Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union (1954–91)36322492
5Flag of Germany.svg  Germany (1925–39, since 1991)33412498
6Flag of Russia.svg  Russia (since 1993)26323189
7Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 24263282
8Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany (1954–89)12151138
9Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 11222457
10Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 10121537
11Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 1071128
12Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia (1925–91)7121130
13Flag of the United States.svg  United States 74617
14Flag of France.svg  France 641222
15Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 45817
16Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany (1954–89)4127
17Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic (since 1993)36615
18Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia (1938, since 1993)35210
19Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan (since 1993)3249
20Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 2136
21Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia (since 1993)1348
22Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 1102
23Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia (1925–91)1001
24Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus (since 1993)0101
Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia (since 1993)0101
26Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine (since 1993)0022
Totals (26 nations)4594594581376

Multiple medalists

Boldface denotes active athletes and highest medal count among all athletes (including these who not included in these tables) per type.

All events

RankAthleteCountryGenderDisciplineFromToGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 Marit Bjørgen Flag of Norway.svg  Norway FCross-country skiing20032017185326
2 Yelena Välbe Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia
FCross-country skiing1989199714317
3 Petter Northug Flag of Norway.svg  Norway MCross-country skiing2007201513316
4 Larisa Lazutina (Ptitsyna) Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia
FCross-country skiing19872001113216
5 Therese Johaug Flag of Norway.svg  Norway FCross-country skiing20072019102315
6 Bjørn Dæhlie Flag of Norway.svg  Norway MCross-country skiing1991199995317
7 Thomas Morgenstern Flag of Austria.svg  Austria MSki jumping2005201382111
8 Eric Frenzel Flag of Germany.svg  Germany MNordic combined2011201976215
9 Gunde Svan Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden MCross-country skiing1985199173111
10 Alevtina Kolchina Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union FCross-country skiing19581966718

Individual events

Men

RankAthleteCountryDisciplineFromToGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 Petter Northug Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Cross-country skiing20092015729
2 Bjørn Dæhlie Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Cross-country skiing1991199954312
3 Gunde Svan Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Cross-country skiing19851991527
4 Vladimir Smirnov Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan
Cross-country skiing1989199543310
5 Mika Myllylä Flag of Finland.svg  Finland Cross-country skiing199519994228
6 Ronny Ackermann Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Nordic combined200120074116
Adam Małysz Flag of Poland.svg  Poland Ski jumping200120114116
8 Eric Frenzel Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Nordic combined201120193115
Johannes Rydzek Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Nordic combined201120173115
10 Birger Ruud Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Ski jumping19311939314
Bjarte Engen Vik Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Nordic combined19972001314

Women

RankAthleteCountryDisciplineFromToGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 Marit Bjørgen Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Cross-country skiing20032017124117
2 Yelena Välbe Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia
Cross-country skiing1989199710212
3 Therese Johaug Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Cross-country skiing2007201971311
4 Larisa Lazutina (Ptitsyna) Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia
Cross-country skiing1987200153210
5 Bente Skari (Martinsen) Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Cross-country skiing1999200355
6 Stefania Belmondo Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Cross-country skiing199119994419
7 Alevtina Kolchina Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union Cross-country skiing19581966415
8 Galina Kulakova Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union Cross-country skiing197019803115
9 Justyna Kowalczyk Flag of Poland.svg  Poland Cross-country skiing200920132327
10 Marjo Matikainen Flag of Finland.svg  Finland Cross-country skiing198719892226

TV broadcasters

Eurosport (75 countries)
Match TV (Russia)
ORF (Austria)
Eesti Media (Estonia)
YLE (Finland)
ARD/ZDF (Germany)
NRK (Norway)
SVT (Sweden)
SRG/SSR (Switzerland)
NBC (USA)

See also

Related Research Articles

Nordic combined winter sport combining the events of cross-country skiing and ski jumping

Nordic combined is a winter sport in which athletes compete in cross-country skiing and ski jumping. Nordic combined at the Winter Olympics and the FIS Nordic Combined World Cup are ongoing.

Ski jumping skiing sport with jumping down a hill

Ski jumping is a winter sport in which competitors aim to achieve the longest jump after descending from a specially designed ramp on their skis. Along with jump length, competitor's style and other factors affect the final score. Ski jumping was first contested in Norway in the late 19th century, and later spread through Europe and North America in the early 20th century. Along with cross-country skiing, it constitutes the traditional group of Nordic skiing disciplines.

United States Ski Team

The U.S. Ski Team, operated under the auspices of the United States Ski and Snowboard Association (USSA), develops and supports men's and women's athletes in the sports of alpine skiing, freestyle skiing, cross-country, ski jumping, and Nordic combined. Since 1974 the team and association have been headquartered in Park City, Utah.

Anssi Koivuranta Finnish ski jumper and Nordic combined athlete

Anssi Einar Koivuranta is a retired Finnish ski jumper and former Nordic combined skier, best known for winning the 2008–09 FIS Nordic Combined World Cup. He won the gold medal in the 4 × 5 km team event and a bronze medal in the 15 km Gundersen race at the 2007 FIS Nordic World Ski Championships in Sapporo. After winning a Ski Jumping World Cup competition in Innsbruck on 4 January 2014, Koivuranta became the first ever athlete in history of ski jumping to win an event in both Nordic combined and the ski jumping World Cup.

Nordic combined at the Winter Olympics

The Nordic combined events have been contested at the Winter Olympic Games since 1924. The first competition involved 18 km cross-country skiing, followed by ski jumping.

FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 1982 1982 edition of the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships

The FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 1982 took place 19–28 February 1982 in Oslo, Norway at the Holmenkollen ski arena. This was Oslo's record-tying fourth time hosting the event after previously doing so in 1930, the 1952 Winter Olympics, and 1966. The Nordic combined 3 × 10 km team event and the ski jumping team large hill events were added to these championships. It was also the year in which cross country competitions had the freestyle technique debuted and that electronic timing returned to scoring the results in tenths of a second after Sweden's Thomas Wassberg edged out Finland's Juha Mieto by 0.01 seconds in the men's 15 km event at the 1980 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid. The timing of the event in tenths of a second has continued as of 2011 in all Nordic skiing events.

FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 2001 2001 edition of the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships

The FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 2001 took place February 15–25, 2001 in Lahti, Finland for a record sixth time, previous events being held in 1926, 1938, 1958, 1978 and 1989. These championships also saw the most event changes since the 1950s with the 5 km women and 10 km men's events being discontinued, the 10 km women and 15 km men's events return to their normal status for the first time since the 1991 championships, the debut of a combined pursuit as a separate category, the addition of the individual sprint race for both genders, and the debut of the ski jumping team normal hill event. Extremely cold weather cancelled the women's 30 km event. The biggest controversy occurred when a doping scandal hit the host nation of Finland, resulting in six disqualifications. This would serve as a prelude to further doping cases in cross country skiing at the Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City the following year.

The FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 2005 took place 16–27 February 2005 in Oberstdorf, Germany, for the second time after hosting it previously in 1987. The ski jumping team normal hill event returned after not being held in 2003. The double pursuit distances of 10 km women and 20 km men were lengthened to 15 km for women and 30 km for men. Team sprint was also added as well. The Nordic combined 4 × 5 km team event had its change between ski jumping points and cross-country skiing start time changed from 1 point equals to 1.5 seconds to 1 point equals 1 second at this championship.

FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 2007 2007 edition of the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships

The FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 2007 took place 22 February – 4 March 2007 in Sapporo, Japan. It was the second time this city has hosted these championships, having previously done so in the 1972 Winter Olympics. Sapporo was selected as venue by vote at the 43rd FIS World Congress in Portorož, Slovenia, on 6 June 2002. It also marked the third time the championships were hosted outside Europe in a year that did not coincide with the Winter Olympics; it was the first championship held in Asia. The ski jumping team normal hill event was not held, as it had been in 2005.

FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 2009 2009 edition of the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships

The FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 2009 took place 18 February – 1 March 2009 in Liberec, Czech Republic. This was the fourth time these championships were hosted either in the Czech Republic or in Czechoslovakia, having done so at Janské Lázně (1925) and Vysoké Tatry.

The FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 2015 took place between 18 February and 1 March 2015 in Falun, Sweden. This was the fourth time the event is held there, having previously been held there in 1954, 1974 and 1993. In 1980, one World Ski Championship race was held there as well, to make up for its exclusion from the Olympic Games the same year.

At the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 2009 in Liberec, Czech Republic, four Nordic combined were held. It also showed the biggest format changes since the introduction of the Gundersen method at the 1985 World Championships in Seefeld, Austria. In addition to the 10 km mass start event, there were changes in the Gundersen-based individual events. The 7.5 km sprint event was changed to a 10 km individual large hill event while the 15 km individual event was changed to a 10 km individual normal hill event with both being approved in September 2008. These changes also affected the Nordic combined program for the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver though the mass start was excluded. The United States, which had two medals in Nordic combined prior to this championships, won a total of four medals with three golds and a bronze. Todd Lodwick, whose previous best individual finish at the world championships was 13th in the 7.5 km sprint at Oberstdorf in 2005, won golds in the 10 km mass start and 10 km individual normal hill events. His teammate Bill Demong won a gold in the 10 km individual large hill and bronze in the 10 km individual normal hill events. Germans Tino Edelmann and Björn Kircheisen each won a silver in the 4 x 5 km freestyle team event, then won individual silver medals in the 10 km mass start and 10 km individual large hills events, respectively. France's Jason Lamy Chappuis earned two bronze medals, earning them in the 10 km individual large hill and 10 km mass start. Norway's Jan Schmid won a silver in the 10 km mass start and a bronze in the 4 x 5 km freestyle event. A fourth American medal was prevented when Demong was disqualified in the ski jumping part of the 4 x 5 km freestyle team event for failing to wear his bib during competition, dropping the US to 12th and forcing their withdrawal from the cross country portion of the event. The Japanese won their first gold medal at the championships in the team event since 1995 when they edged the Germans in a photo finish. Current World Cup leader Anssi Koivuranta of Finland has a disappointing world championships, earning his best finish of fourth both in the 10 km individual normal hill and 10 km mass start events. Norway's Magnus Moan, second in the World Cup standings, also had a disappointing championships as well, with a best place finish of fifth in the 10 km individual large hill events even though he set the fastest cross-country skiing portion time in both the 10 km individual large hill and the 10 km individual normal hill events.

The men's individual large hill/10 km Nordic combined competition for the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, Canada was held at Whistler Olympic Park in Whistler, British Columbia on 25 February.

For the 1924 Winter Olympics in Chamonix, France, a total of three sports venues were used. The main stadium was used for all but two sports and part of a third. It was the first ski jump used for the Winter Olympics. A bobsleigh track was prepared for use.

Venues of the 1998 Winter Olympics

For the 1998 Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan, a total of fifteen sports venues were used. Nagano had attempted twice to host the Winter Olympics, losing out to Sapporo, host of the 1972 Winter Olympics. The third time, in 1991, Nagano edged out Salt Lake City to host the 1998 Games. The biathlon venue was adjusted in accordance with the Washington Convention over endangered species. The biggest venue controversy was at Happo'one resort on the length of the men's downhill and the battle that ensued to the point where skiing officials threatened to pull the event entirely before a compromise was reached three months before the Olympics. M-Wave has hosted three World Speed Skating Championships since the Olympics while the Spiral has hosted a couple of World championships in bobsleigh, luge, and skeleton.

The Men's Individual normal hill/10 km at the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 2011 was held on 26 February 2011. The ski jumping part of the event took place at 10:00 CET with the cross-country part took place at 13:00 CET. Todd Lodwick of the United States was the defending world champion while France's Jason Lamy Chappuis was the defending Olympic champion.

Tremplin du Praz

Tremplin du Praz is a ski jumping hill at Le Praz in Courchevel, France. The complex consists of four hills: a large hill with construction point of K125 (HS137), a normal hill at K90 (HS96), and two training hills at K60 and K25. The complex also has a cross-country skiing stadium used for Nordic combined. Jörg Ritzerfeld holds the large hill winter record of 134.0 metres and Nicolas Mayer the normal hill record of 100.5 metres.

FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 2019 2019 edition of the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships

The 41st FIS Nordic World Ski Championships were held from 20 February to 3 March 2019 in Seefeld in Tirol, Tyrol, Austria. It was the second time Seefeld in Tirol hosted the world championships, the event having been hosted there previously in 1985.

References

  1. "14th Garmisch-Partenkirchen (GER) 1936". www.fis-ski.com. International Ski Federation (FIS) . Retrieved 11 January 2019.
  2. "25th Mamaia (ROM) 1965". www.fis-ski.com. International Ski Federation (FIS) . Retrieved 11 January 2019.
  3. "16th Pau (FRA) 1946". www.fis-ski.com. International Ski Federetion (FIS) . Retrieved 11 January 2019.
  4. Non-Olympic event: women's 20 km cross-country skiing.
  5. Non-Olympic events: FIN: 3 x 10 km team Nordic combined; SUI: Non-Olympic event: team large hill ski jumping.