World Cup (snooker)

Last updated

World Cup
World Cup (snooker) logo.jpg
Tournament information
Location Wuxi
Country China
Established 1979
Organisation(s) World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association
Format Non-Ranking event
Total prize fund $800,000
Current champion(s) Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Ding Junhui
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Liang Wenbo

The World Cup is an invitational snooker tournament created by Mike Watterson. The annual contests featured teams of three players representing their country against other such teams. Steve Davis has won the event more times than any other player, with four titles for England.

Snooker cue sport

Snooker is a cue sport which originated among British Army officers stationed in India in the later half of the 19th century. It is played on a rectangular table covered with a green cloth, or baize, with pockets at each of the four corners and in the middle of each long side. Using a cue and 22 coloured balls, players must strike the white ball to pot the remaining balls in the correct sequence, accumulating points for each pot. An individual game, or frame, is won by the player scoring the most points. A match is won when a player wins a predetermined number of frames.

Mike Watterson is an English former professional snooker player, businessman, entrepreneur and television commentator. He won a National Amateur Championship, and was an England Amateur international for two years before turning professional in January 1981.

Steve Davis English former professional snooker player, 6-time world champion (last 1989)

Steve Davis, is an English retired professional snooker player from Plumstead, London. Widely regarded as a pivotal figure in the emergence of the modern professional game, Davis dominated snooker during the 1980s, reaching eight World Championship finals in nine years, winning six world titles, and holding the world number one ranking for seven consecutive seasons. His most memorable match came when he faced Dennis Taylor in the 1985 World Championship final, the black-ball conclusion of which still holds the record for the largest after-midnight television audience in British history, with 18.5 million viewers.

Contents

History

The event began in 1979 as the World Challenge Cup with the sponsorship of State Express. It was held at the Haden Hill Leisure Centre, Birmingham, with six teams participating: England, Northern Ireland, Wales, Canada, Australia and Rest of the World. The teams were broken into two round-robin groups and the matches were best of 15 frames. The top teams in the groups met in the final. In 1980 the tournament moved to the New London Theatre and the Northern Ireland team was replaced by an All-Ireland team. [1]

The event was renamed to the World Team Classic in 1981 and moved to the Hexagon Theatre in Reading. The matches were reduced to best of seven and the top two teams from the groups advanced to the semi-finals. This time seven teams competed. Team Rest of the World were replaced by Team Scotland and instead of an All-Ireland team both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland fielded teams. After the 1983 event State Express ended their sponsorship of the event and the tournament's place in the snooker calendar was taken by the Grand Prix. [1]

The Hexagon theatre and arts centre in Reading, Berkshire, England

The Hexagon is a multi-purpose theatre and arts venue in Reading, Berkshire, England. Built in 1977 in the shape of an elongated hexagon, the theatre is operated by Reading Borough Council under the name "Reading Arts and Venues" along with South Street Arts Centre and Reading's concert hall.

Reading, Berkshire Place in England

Reading is a large minster town in Berkshire, England, of which it is now the county town. It is in the Thames Valley at the confluence of the River Thames and River Kennet, and on both the Great Western Main Line railway and the M4 motorway. Reading is 70 miles (110 km) east of Bristol, 24 miles (39 km) south of Oxford, 40 miles (64 km) west of London, 14 miles (23 km) north of Basingstoke, 12 miles (19 km) south-west of Maidenhead and 15 miles (24 km) east of Newbury as the crow flies.

The World Open is a professional ranking snooker tournament. It had previously been known as the Professional Players Tournament, the LG Cup and the Grand Prix. During 2006 and 2007, it was played in a unique round-robin format, more similar to association football and rugby tournaments than the knock-out systems usually played in snooker. The knock-out format returned in 2008 with an FA Cup-style draw. The random draw was abandoned after the 2010 edition. Mark Williams is the defending champion.

The event was moved to spring for the 1984/1985 season and the event was renamed the World Cup. It was held at the International, Bournemouth. The tournament also became a knock-out contest and featured eight teams. Ireland and Northern Ireland fielded a combined team, known as All-Ireland, the Rest of the World team returned and the defending champions, England, had two teams. The event was terminated after the 1990 event. [1]

The snooker season 1984/1985 was a series of snooker tournaments played from July 1984 to May 1985. The following table outlines the results for the ranking and the invitational events.

Bournemouth International Centre

The Bournemouth International Centre in Bournemouth, Dorset, was opened in September 1984. It is one of the largest venues for conferences, exhibitions, entertainment and events in southern England. Additionally, it is well known for hosting national conferences of major British political parties and trade unions. At opening it comprised two halls, the Windsor Hall and the Tregonwell Hall.

Single-elimination tournament knock-out sports competition

A single-elimination, knockout, or sudden death tournament is a type of elimination tournament where the loser of each match-up is immediately eliminated from the tournament. Each winner will play another in the next round, until the final match-up, whose winner becomes the tournament champion. Each match-up may be a single match or several, for example two-legged ties in European football or best-of series in American pro sports. Defeated competitors may play no further part after losing, or may participate in "consolation" or "classification" matches against other losers to determine the lower final rankings; for example, a third place playoff between losing semi-finalists. In a shootout poker tournament, there are more than two players competing at each table, and sometimes more than one progressing to the next round. Some competitions are held with a pure single-elimination tournament system. Others have many phases, with the last being a single-elimination final stage, often called playoffs.

The event was briefly revived for 1996 and it was held at the Amari Watergate Hotel in Bangkok, Thailand. There were many entries and qualification was held. The 20 qualified team were split into four groups of five and the top two teams of the groups advanced to the quarter-finals. [1]

Bangkok Special administrative area in Thailand

Bangkok is the capital and most populous city of Thailand. It is known in Thai as Krung Thep Maha Nakhon or simply Krung Thep. The city occupies 1,568.7 square kilometres (605.7 sq mi) in the Chao Phraya River delta in central Thailand, and has a population of over eight million, or 12.6 percent of the country's population. Over fourteen million people lived within the surrounding Bangkok Metropolitan Region at the 2010 census, making Bangkok the nation's primate city, significantly dwarfing Thailand's other urban centres in terms of importance.

On 22 March 2011 it was revealed that the World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association planned to revive the event with the sponsorship of PTT and EGAT. It was held between 11 and 17 July at the Bangkok Convention Centre, Bangkok and twenty two-men teams participated at the tournament. [2] [3]

World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association

The World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association (WPBSA), founded in 1968 and based in Bristol, the United Kingdom, is the governing body of men's professional snooker and English billiards. It owns and sets the official rules of the two sports and engages in promotional activities on behalf of the sports.

PTT Public Company Limited other organization in Bangkok, Thailand

PTT Public Company Limited or simply PTT is a Thai state-owned SET-listed oil and gas company. Formerly known as the Petroleum Authority of Thailand, it owns extensive submarine gas pipelines in the Gulf of Thailand, a network of LPG terminals throughout the kingdom, and is involved in electricity generation, petrochemical products, oil and gas exploration and production, and gasoline retailing businesses.

Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand

The Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT; is a state enterprise, managed by the Ministry of Energy, responsible for electric power generation and transmission as well as bulk electric energy sales in Thailand. EGAT, established on 1 May 1969, is the largest power producer in Thailand, owning and operating power plants at 45 sites across the country with a total installed capacity of 15,548 MW.

Winners

[1]

YearWinnersRunners-upFinal scoreHost citySeason
TeamPlayersTeamPlayers
World Challenge Cup (team event)
1979 Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Wales Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Ray Reardon
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Terry Griffiths
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Doug Mountjoy
Flag of England.svg England Flag of England.svg Fred Davis
Flag of England.svg John Spencer
Flag of England.svg Graham Miles
14–3 Flag of England.svg Birmingham 1979/80
1980 Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Wales Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Ray Reardon
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Terry Griffiths
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Doug Mountjoy
Flag of Canada.svg Canada Flag of Canada.svg Cliff Thorburn
Flag of Canada.svg Kirk Stevens
Flag of Canada.svg Bill Werbeniuk
8–5 Flag of England.svg London 1980/81
World Team Classic (team event)
1981 [4] Flag of England.svg England Flag of England.svg Steve Davis
Flag of England.svg John Spencer
Flag of England.svg David Taylor
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Wales Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Ray Reardon
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Terry Griffiths
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Doug Mountjoy
4–3 Flag of England.svg Reading 1981/82
1982 [5] Flag of Canada.svg Canada Flag of Canada.svg Cliff Thorburn
Flag of Canada.svg Kirk Stevens
Flag of Canada.svg Bill Werbeniuk
Flag of England.svg England Flag of England.svg Steve Davis
Flag of England.svg Tony Knowles
Flag of England.svg Jimmy White
4–2 Flag of England.svg Reading 1982/83
1983 [6] Flag of England.svg England Flag of England.svg Steve Davis
Flag of England.svg Tony Knowles
Flag of England.svg Tony Meo
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Wales Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Ray Reardon
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Terry Griffiths
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Doug Mountjoy
4–2 Flag of England.svg Reading 1983/84
World Cup (team event)
1985 [7]  All-Ireland Flag of Northern Ireland.svg Alex Higgins
Flag of Northern Ireland.svg Dennis Taylor
Flag of Ireland.svg Eugene Hughes
Flag of England.svg England "A" Flag of England.svg Steve Davis
Flag of England.svg Tony Knowles
Flag of England.svg Tony Meo
9–7 Flag of England.svg Bournemouth 1984/85
1986 [8]   Ireland A Flag of Northern Ireland.svg Alex Higgins
Flag of Northern Ireland.svg Dennis Taylor
Flag of Ireland.svg Eugene Hughes
Flag of Canada.svg Canada Flag of Canada.svg Cliff Thorburn
Flag of Canada.svg Kirk Stevens
Flag of Canada.svg Bill Werbeniuk
9–7 Flag of England.svg Bournemouth 1985/86
1987 [8]  Ireland A Flag of Northern Ireland.svg Alex Higgins
Flag of Northern Ireland.svg Dennis Taylor
Flag of Ireland.svg Eugene Hughes
Flag of Canada.svg Canada Flag of Canada.svg Cliff Thorburn
Flag of Canada.svg Kirk Stevens
Flag of Canada.svg Bill Werbeniuk
9–2 Flag of England.svg Bournemouth 1986/87
1988 [9] Flag of England.svg England Flag of England.svg Steve Davis
Flag of England.svg Jimmy White
Flag of England.svg Neal Foulds
Flag of Australia.svg Australia Flag of Australia.svg Eddie Charlton
Flag of Australia.svg John Campbell
Flag of Australia.svg Warren King
9–7 Flag of England.svg Bournemouth 1987/88
1989 [8] Flag of England.svg England Flag of England.svg Steve Davis
Flag of England.svg Jimmy White
Flag of England.svg Neal Foulds
Rest of the World Flag of South Africa (1928-1982).svg Silvino Francisco
Flag of New Zealand.svg Dene O'Kane
Flag of Malta.svg Tony Drago
9–8 Flag of England.svg Bournemouth 1988/89
1990 [8] Flag of Canada.svg Canada Flag of Canada.svg Cliff Thorburn
Flag of Canada.svg Alain Robidoux
Flag of Canada.svg Bob Chaperon
Flag of Northern Ireland.svg Northern Ireland Flag of Northern Ireland.svg Alex Higgins
Flag of Northern Ireland.svg Dennis Taylor
Flag of Northern Ireland.svg Tommy Murphy
9–5 Flag of England.svg Bournemouth 1989/90
World Cup (team event)
1996 [10] Flag of Scotland.svg Scotland Flag of Scotland.svg Stephen Hendry
Flag of Scotland.svg John Higgins
Flag of Scotland.svg Alan McManus
Flag of Ireland.svg Republic of Ireland Flag of Ireland.svg Ken Doherty
Flag of Ireland.svg Fergal O'Brien
Flag of Ireland.svg Stephen Murphy
10–7 Flag of Thailand.svg Bangkok 1996/97
World Cup (team event)
2011 [3] Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Ding Junhui
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Liang Wenbo
Flag of Northern Ireland.svg Northern Ireland Flag of Northern Ireland.svg Mark Allen
Flag of Northern Ireland.svg Gerard Greene
4–2 Flag of Thailand.svg Bangkok 2011/12
2015 [11] Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China B Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Yan Bingtao
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Zhou Yuelong
Flag of Scotland.svg Scotland Flag of Scotland.svg John Higgins
Flag of Scotland.svg Stephen Maguire
4–1 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Wuxi 2015/16
2017 [12] Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China A Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Ding Junhui
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Liang Wenbo
Flag of England.svg England Flag of England.svg Judd Trump
Flag of England.svg Barry Hawkins
4–3 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Wuxi 2017/18

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

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