Watson Settlement Bridge

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Watson Settlement Bridge
WATSON SETTLEMENT BRIDGE.jpg
USA Maine location map.svg
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Nearest city Littleton, Maine
Coordinates 46°12′36″N67°48′3″W / 46.21000°N 67.80083°W / 46.21000; -67.80083 Coordinates: 46°12′36″N67°48′3″W / 46.21000°N 67.80083°W / 46.21000; -67.80083
Area 0.3 acres (0.12 ha)
Built 1911
Architectural style Howe Truss System
NRHP reference # 70000039 [1]
Added to NRHP February 16, 1970

Watson Settlement Bridge is a historic covered bridge in eastern Littleton, Maine, United States. Built in 1911, it is one of the youngest of Maine's few surviving covered bridges. It formerly carried Framingham Road over the Meduxnekeag River, but is now closed to traffic, the road passing over a modern bridge to its south. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1970. [1]

Covered bridge wooden bridge with protective cover

A covered bridge is a timber-truss bridge with a roof, decking, and siding, which in most covered bridges, create an almost complete enclosure. The purpose of the covering is to protect the wooden structural members from the weather. Uncovered wooden bridges typically have a lifespan of only 20 years because of the effects of rain and sun, but a covered bridge could last 100 years.

Littleton, Maine Town in Maine, United States

Littleton is a town in Aroostook County, Maine, United States. The population was 1,068 at the 2010 census.

The Meduxnekeag River is a tributary of the Saint John River. It is about 35 miles (56 km) long. The North Branch Meduxnekeag River rises from the outlet of a small pond in Maine and runs to its confluence with the Meduxnekeag in Wakefield, New Brunswick. The South Branch Meduxnekeag River rises from the outflow of Johnson Pond in Linneus, and runs to its confluence with the Meduxnekeag River two miles upstream from Houlton, Maine. The Meduxnekeag joins the Saint John in Woodstock, New Brunswick.

Contents

Description and history

The Watson Settlement Bridge is located in southeastern Littleton, a rural community in southern Aroostook County. The Meduxnekeag River flows north from Houlton into southeastern Littleton before turning east and crossing the international border into New Brunswick, Canada. Framingham Road, which the bridge formerly carried, crosses just south of the bridge on a modern structure. The covered bridge is about 150 feet (46 m) long, with two spans resting on stone abutments and a central pier. The bases of these structures are rubblestone that has been reinforced with concrete, with a 5-foot (1.5 m) top section that is contained within a timber cribwork. The structure is about 20 feet (6.1 m) wide and a similar height, with an internal clearance height of 13 feet 2 inches (4.01 m) and width of 18 feet (5.5 m). The support system for the two spans are Howe trusses. The exterior of the bridge is finished in vertical siding, and the roof is shingled. [2]

Aroostook County, Maine County in the United States

Aroostook County is a county in the U.S. state of Maine along the Canada–U.S. border. As of the 2010 census, the population was 71,870. Its seat is Houlton.

Houlton, Maine Town in Maine, United States

Houlton is a town in Aroostook County, Maine, on the Canada–US border, located at 46.1256°N 67.8398°W. As of the 2010 census, the town's population was 6,123. It is perhaps best known for being at the northern terminus of Interstate 95 and as the birthplace of Samantha Smith, a goodwill ambassador as a child during the Cold War. The town hosts the annual Houlton Agricultural Fair.

New Brunswick province in Canada

New Brunswick is one of four Atlantic provinces on the east coast of Canada. According to the Constitution of Canada, New Brunswick is the only bilingual province. About two thirds of the population declare themselves anglophones and a third francophones. One third of the population describes themselves as bilingual. Atypically for Canada, only about half of the population lives in urban areas, mostly in Greater Moncton, Greater Saint John and the capital Fredericton.

The bridge appears to be the first built at this location, no bridges having been marked on earlier maps of the area. It was built in 1911, and was attended by legal action between the county and the town over the cost of building its approaches, which was ultimately borne by the town. [2] The bridge was closed to vehicular traffic with the construction of the adjacent bridge in 1984.

See also

National Register of Historic Places listings in Aroostook County, Maine Wikimedia list article

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Aroostook County, Maine.

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