Winnipeg North

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Winnipeg North
Flag of Manitoba.svg Manitoba electoral district
Winnipeg-North 2013 Riding.png
Winnipeg North in relation to other Manitoba federal electoral districts as of the 2013 Representation Order. Dotted line shows Winnipeg city limits.
Federal electoral district
Legislature House of Commons
MP
 
 
 
Kevin Lamoureux
Liberal
District created1914
First contested 1917
Last contested 2021
District webpage profile, map
Demographics
Population (2011) [1] 88,616
Electors (2015)56,380
Area (km²) [1] 38
Pop. density (per km²)2,332
Census division(s) Division No. 11
Census subdivision(s) Winnipeg

Winnipeg North (French : Winnipeg-Nord) is a federal electoral district in Canada that has been represented in the House of Commons of Canada since 1917. It covers the northern portion of Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Contents

Geography

The riding includes the neighbourhoods of Jefferson North, Mandalay West, Maple Glen, Garden City, Jefferson, St. John's, Inkster Faraday, William Whyte, Dufferin, North End, Burrows Central, Robertson, Selkirk, Mynarski, Northwood, Shaughnessy Heights, Lord, Tyndall Park, Garden Grove, Oak Point, Inkster Gardens, Luxton, the south part of The Maples and the north part of Logan CPR in the Winnipeg.

Demographics

Ethnic groups in Winnipeg North (2016)
Source:
Population %
Ethnic group European 35,645
Filipino 30,740
Aboriginal 15,660
South Asian 10,460
Black 2,085
Southeast Asian 1,835
Chinese 965
Latin American 685
Arab 205
West Asian 115
Korean 105
Japanese 85
Multiple minorities1,420
Visible minority, n.i.e.410
Total population94,700
According to the Canada 2011 Census; 2013 representation [2] [3]

Ethnic groups: 39.2% White, 28.6% Filipino, 18.2% Aboriginal, 1.9% Southeast Asian, 1.9% Black, 1.3% Chinese
Languages: 62.6% English, 16.8% Tagalog, 5.0% Punjabi, 1.9% Portuguese, 1.8% Ukrainian, 1.3% Polish, 1.3% French, 1.0% Chinese
Religions: 68.0% Christian (44.0% Catholic, 3.4% United Church, 2.8% Anglican, 1.8% Baptist, 1.7% Pentecostal, 1.6% Lutheran, 1.2% Christian Orthodox, 11.4% Other), 5.1% Sikh, 1.3% Buddhist, 1.1% Hindu, 22.2% No religion
Median income (2010): $24,695
Average income (2010): $28,984

Winnipeg North is the riding with:

History

This riding was originally created in 1914 from Winnipeg and Selkirk ridings.

In 1997, it was renamed "Winnipeg North—St. Paul".

In 2003, Winnipeg North—St. Paul was abolished with parts transferred to Winnipeg North, Winnipeg Centre and Kildonan—St. Paul ridings. Winnipeg North was re-created from parts of Winnipeg North—St. Paul and Winnipeg North Centre.

Historically a safe seat for the New Democratic Party, in 2011 Winnipeg North was narrowly retained by Liberal incumbent Kevin Lamoureux in an otherwise dismal performance by the party nationwide. [9] Along with Wascana around Regina, Saskatchewan, Winnipeg North was one of only two seats won by the Liberals in the Prairie Provinces.

This riding gained territory from Kildonan—St. Paul during the 2012 Canadian federal electoral redistribution.

Kevin Lamoureux was re-elected to represent Winnipeg North in the 2015 Canadian federal election, as the Liberals formed a majority government. In 2015, he was the only incumbent MP from Winnipeg to be re-elected. He was re-elected in 2019 and 2021.

Members of Parliament

This riding has elected the following Members of Parliament:

ParliamentYearsMemberParty
Winnipeg North
Riding created from Winnipeg and Selkirk
13th  1917–1921   Matthew Robert Blake Government (Unionist)
14th  1921–1925   Edward James McMurray Liberal
15th  1925–1926   Abraham Albert Heaps Labour
16th  1926–1930
17th  1930–1935
18th  1935–1940   Co-operative Commonwealth
19th  1940–1945   Charles Stephen Booth Liberal
20th  1945–1949   Alistair Stewart Co-operative Commonwealth
21st  1949–1953
22nd  1953–1957
23rd  1957–1958
24th  1958–1962   Murray Smith Progressive Conservative
25th  1962–1963   David Orlikow New Democratic
26th  1963–1965
27th  1965–1968
28th  1968–1972
29th  1972–1974
30th  1974–1979
31st  1979–1980
32nd  1980–1984
33rd  1984–1988
34th  1988–1993   Rey Pagtakhan Liberal
35th  1993–1997
Riding dissolved into Winnipeg North—St. Paul
Riding re-created from Winnipeg North—St. Paul and Winnipeg North Centre
38th  2004–2006   Judy Wasylycia-Leis New Democratic
39th  2006–2008
40th  2008–2010
 2010–2011   Kevin Lamoureux Liberal
41st  2011–2015
42nd  2015–2019
43rd  2019–2021
44th  2021–present

Election results

Winnipeg North, 2004–present

Graph of election results in Winnipeg North (minor parties that never got 2% of the vote or didn't run consistently are omitted)
2021 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%Expenditures
Liberal Kevin Lamoureux 16,44252.3+4.7
New Democratic Melissa Chung-Mowat8,99828.6+2.7
Conservative Anas Kassem4,12613.1-7.7
People's Patrick Neilan1,3154.2+3.2
Green Angela Brydges4181.3-1.5
Communist Robert Crooks1090.3-0.1
Total valid votes31,40899.1
Total rejected ballots2870.9
Turnout31,69550.8
Eligible voters62,419
Liberal hold Swing +1.0
Source: Elections Canada [10]
2019 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%Expenditures
Liberal Kevin Lamoureux 15,58147.60-21.30$58,222.18
New Democratic Kyle Mason8,46925.87+12.50none listed
Conservative Jordyn Ham6,82020.83+5.54$1,264.48
Green Sai Shanthanand Rajagopal9062.77+0.34$503.13
People's Victor Ong3240.99--$0.00
Christian Heritage Henry Hizon2790.85--none listed
Independent Kathy Doyle2310.71--none listed
Communist Andrew Taylor1250.38--none listed
Total valid votes/expense limit32,73599.26
Total rejected ballots2430.74-0.05
Turnout32,97851.79-6.66
Eligible voters63,681
Liberal hold Swing -16.90
Source: Elections Canada [11] [12]
Victor Ong was nominated by the People's Party, but resigned on 8 October. As the deadline had passed, his name remained on the ballot.
2015 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%Expenditures
Liberal Kevin Lamoureux 23,40268.90+33.91$83,435.85
Conservative Harpreet Turka5,19315.29-12.07$35,641.92
New Democratic Levy Abad4,54313.38-22.02$25,774.97
Green John Redekopp8262.43+0.65$833.17
Total valid votes/expense limit33,96499.21 $193,725.29
Total rejected ballots2690.79
Turnout34,23358.45
Eligible voters58,573
Liberal notional gain from New Democratic Swing +27.97
Source: Elections Canada [13] [14]
2011 federal election redistributed results [15]
PartyVote %
  New Democratic 9,44035.40
  Liberal 9,33134.99
  Conservative 7,29527.36
  Green 4751.78
 Others1260.47
2011 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%Expenditures
Liberal Kevin Lamoureux [16] 9,09735.78-10.54$75,214.57
New Democratic Rebecca Blaikie 9,05335.60-5.57$71,243.32
Conservative Ann Matejicka6,70126.35+15.9$40,787.18
Green John Harvie4581.80+1.08$0.00
Communist Frank Komarniski1180.46+0.01$502.42
Total valid votes/expense limit25,427100.00
Total rejected ballots1360.53-0.04
Turnout25,56350.01+19.2
Eligible voters51,115
Liberal hold Swing -4.97
Canadian federal by-election, 29 November 2010
PartyCandidateVotes%±%Expenditures
Liberal Kevin Lamoureux 7,30346.32+37.10$74,020.45
New Democratic Kevin Chief 6,49041.17-21.44$64,585.69
Conservative Julie Javier1,64710.45-11.90$53,166.90
Green John Harvie1140.72-4.03$1,410.65
Pirate Jeff Coleman940.60$62.08
Communist Frank Komarniski710.45-0.22$192.32
Christian Heritage Eric Truijen460.29$1,790
Total valid votes/Expense limit15,765100.00  $77,132
Total rejected ballots 91 0.57+0.07
Turnout 15,856 30.8-12
Eligible votersN/A
Due to the resignation of Judy Wasylycia-Leis on 30 April 2010
Liberal gain from New Democratic Swing +29.27
2008 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%Expenditures
New Democratic Judy Wasylycia-Leis 14,09762.6%+5.4%$55,724
Conservative Ray Larkin5,03322.4%+4.8%$6,136
Liberal Marcelle Marion2,0759.2%−11.9%$13,525
Green Catharine Johannson1,0774.8%+1.9%$491
Communist Frank Komarniski1510.7%+0.2%$622
People's Political Power Roger F. Poisson900.4%N/A$4,416
Total valid votes/expense limit22,523100.0% $75,935
Total rejected ballots
Turnout %
2006 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%Expenditures
New Democratic Judy Wasylycia-Leis 15,58257.18+9.02$53,357.55
Liberal Parmjeet Gill5,75221.11−15.44$64,979.49
Conservative Garreth McDonald4,81017.65+5.38$5,321.33
Green David Carey7792.86+0.82$397.50
Christian Heritage Eric Truijen2070.76+0.22
Communist Darrell Rankin 1230.45+0.02$295.28
Total valid votes27,253 100.00
Rejected ballots137
Turnout27,390 50.91 +3.78
Electors on the lists53,805
Sources: Official Results, Elections Canada and Financial Returns, Elections Canada.
2004 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%Expenditures
New Democratic Judy Wasylycia-Leis 12,50748.16+1.53$34,948.23
Liberal Rey Pagtakhan 9,49136.55+0.04$61,961.93
Conservative Kris Stevenson3,18612.27−2.56$9,148.61
Green Alon Weinberg5312.04$2,287.45
Christian Heritage Eric Truijen1410.54$1,000.00
Communist Darrell Rankin 1110.43$654.58
Total valid votes25,967 100.00
Rejected ballots128
Turnout26,095 47.13
Electors on the lists55,372
Percentage change figures are factored for redistribution. Conservative Party percentages are contrasted with the combined Canadian Alliance and Progressive Conservative percentages from 2000.
Sources: Official Results, Elections Canada and Financial Returns, Elections Canada.

Winnipeg North, 1917–1993

Graph of election results in Winnipeg North (1917-1993, minor parties that never got 2% of the vote or didn't run consistently are omitted)
1993 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Rey Pagtakhan 22,18051.2+12.9
New Democratic Judy Wasylycia-Leis 13,70631.7-2.5
Reform Mike Wiens4,1249.5+7.7
Progressive Conservative Lynn Filbert1,9924.6-20.0
National Anna Polonyi7671.8
Natural Law Federico Papetti2110.5
Independent Mary Stanley1840.4
Canada Party Joe Lynch1350.3
Total valid votes43,299 100.0
1988 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Rey Pagtakhan 16,37538.3+13.5
New Democratic David Orlikow 14,61234.2-9.1
Progressive Conservative Norman Perry Isler10,52724.6-5.6
Reform Ritchie W. Gural7931.9
Independent Stephen Keki2140.5
Communist Frank Goldspink1500.4-0.3
Independent Gurdeep Singh790.2
Total valid votes42,750 100.0
1984 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
New Democratic David Orlikow 18,20943.3-7.2
Progressive Conservative Luba Fedorkiw12,70530.2+7.6
Liberal Chris Lorenc10,42124.8-1.1
Communist Paula Fletcher2830.7+0.1
Independent William Hawryluk2430.6
Independent E.T. Dolski1800.4
Total valid votes42,041 100.0
1980 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
New Democratic David Orlikow 18,56150.5-2.2
Liberal Walter Hlady9,51725.9+7.1
Progressive Conservative Roy Koniuk8,31322.6-5.0
Communist William C. Ross1950.50.0
Marxist–Leninist Brian Ostrow1490.4+0.1
Total valid votes36,735 100.0
1979 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
New Democratic David Orlikow 22,41752.7+11.8
Progressive Conservative Anne Steen11,74927.6-5.5
Liberal Walter Hlady8,00218.8-4.8
Communist William C. Ross2420.6-0.5
Marxist–Leninist Brian Ostrow1410.3+0.1
Total valid votes42,551 100.0
1974 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
New Democratic David Orlikow 15,02640.9-1.9
Progressive Conservative Anne Steen12,19633.2+7.8
Liberal Robert Parashin8,67723.6-6.4
Social Credit William Hawryluk4101.1
Communist William C. Ross3901.1-0.5
Marxist–Leninist Avrum Rosner800.2
Total valid votes36,779 100.0
1972 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
New Democratic David Orlikow 15,93142.8-2.7
Liberal Serge Radchuk11,15030.0-12.7
Progressive Conservative Anne Steen9,44625.4+16.0
Independent W.C. Ross5871.6-1.0
Independent C. Aili Waldman1140.3
Total valid votes37,228 100.0
1968 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
New Democratic David Orlikow 15,60845.5-2.2
Liberal Cecil W. Semchyshyn14,64542.7+14.8
Progressive Conservative Gary Raymond Scherbain3,2069.3-13.5
Communist W.C. Ross8692.5
Total valid votes34,328 100.0
1965 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
New Democratic David Orlikow 22,95047.7+11.2
Liberal Robert Taft13,42027.9-3.8
Progressive Conservative Walter Paschak10,99222.8-5.5
Social Credit Jacob Willms7711.6-1.8
Total valid votes48,133 100.0
1963 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
New Democratic David Orlikow 18,51236.5-0.2
Liberal Paul Parashin16,08131.7+3.0
Progressive Conservative Don Thompson14,39128.4+0.2
Social Credit Nick Halas1,7293.4-0.1
Total valid votes50,713 100.0
1962 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
New Democratic David Orlikow 18,23636.7-5.3
Liberal Paul Parashin14,27028.7+16.4
Progressive Conservative Murray Smith14,00028.1-14.3
Social Credit John De Fehr1,7333.5
Communist W.C. Ross1,5043.0-0.2
Total valid votes49,743 100.0

Note: NDP vote is compared to CCF vote in 1958 election. Communist vote is compared to Labour-Progressive vote in 1958 election.

1958 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Progressive Conservative Murray Smith 19,62942.4+25.9
Co-operative Commonwealth Alistair Stewart19,41442.0-6.7
Liberal Nina Partrick5,70012.3-11.1
Labor–Progressive William Cecil Ross1,5033.3-0.5
Total valid votes46,246 100.0
1957 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Co-operative Commonwealth Alistair Stewart 20,35448.7-0.5
Liberal Peter Taraska9,80623.5-6.4
Progressive Conservative Murray Smith6,90516.5+3.8
Social Credit Nick Halas3,1617.6
Labor–Progressive William Cecil Ross1,5793.8-4.5
Total valid votes41,805 100.0
1953 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Co-operative Commonwealth Alistair Stewart 15,00549.2+9.9
Liberal Frank Chester 9,09429.8-8.0
Progressive Conservative John Kereluk3,87612.7+7.0
Labor–Progressive Joseph Zuken 2,5158.2-8.9
Total valid votes30,490 100.0
1949 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Co-operative Commonwealth Alistair Stewart 12,43239.3+1.4
Liberal Peter Taraska11,96237.8+12.2
Labor–Progressive Joseph Zuken 5,40617.1-9.4
Progressive Conservative John Hunter Restall1,8165.7-1.8
Total valid votes31,616 100.0
1945 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Co-operative Commonwealth Alistair Stewart 13,05537.9+2.6
Labor–Progressive Joseph Zuken 9,11626.5+9.8
Liberal Peter Taraska8,83925.7-15.2
Progressive Conservative William John English2,5847.5+0.4
Social Credit Henry Lambert Yonker8642.5
Total valid votes34,458 100.0

Note: Labour-Progressive vote is compared to Communist vote in 1940 election. Progressive Conservative vote is compared to "National Government" vote in 1940 election.

1940 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Charles Stephen Booth 13,01540.9+11.6
Co-operative Commonwealth Abraham Albert Heaps 11,24935.3-6.8
Communist Leslie Tom Morris 5,31516.7-8.7
National Government Percy Ellor2,2557.1
Total valid votes31,834 100.0
1935 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Co-operative Commonwealth Abraham Albert Heaps 12,09342.2-6.9
Liberal C.S. Booth8,41229.3+14.0
Communist Tim Buck 7,27625.4
Social Credit Fred John Welwood9053.2
Total valid votes28,686 100.0
1930 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Abraham Albert Heaps 6,90749.0-0.1
Conservative Matthew Robert Blake5,01135.6+7.3
Liberal Leslie Morris2,16415.4-7.1
Total valid votes14,082 100.0
1926 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Abraham Albert Heaps 6,17149.2+10.1
Conservative Richard R. Knox3,55528.3-3.4
Liberal George Boyd McTavish2,82122.5-6.7
Total valid votes12,547 100.0
1925 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Abraham Albert Heaps 4,78139.1+6.5
Conservative Matthew Robert Blake3,88231.7
Liberal Edward James McMurray3,57329.2-35.5
Total valid votes12,236 100.0
Canadian federal by-election, 24 October 1923
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Due to McMurray's appointment to an "office of emolument"
Liberal Edward James McMurray 5,62864.7+35.3
Labour Abraham Albert Heaps 2,83532.6+27.2
UnknownPaul Gigejczuc1992.3
UnknownJoseph Martin390.4
Total valid votes8,701 100.0
1921 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Edward James McMurray 3,80936.2+9.8
Socialist Robert Boyd Russell3,09429.4
Conservative Matthew Robert Blake3,04529.0-44.6
Labour Jacob Penner 5655.4
Total valid votes10,513 100.0

Note: Conservative vote is compared to Government vote in 1917 election. Liberal vote is compared to Opposition vote in 1711 election.

1917 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%
Government (Unionist) Matthew Robert Blake 9,65673.6
Opposition (Laurier Liberals) Richard Arthur Rigg 3,47226.4
Total valid votes13,128 100.0

See also

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References

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  2. Government of Canada, Statistics Canada (February 8, 2012). "Statistics Canada: 2011 Census Profile". www12.statcan.gc.ca.
  3. Government of Canada, Statistics Canada (May 8, 2013). "2011 National Household Survey Profile - Federal electoral district (2013 Representation Order)". www12.statcan.gc.ca.
  4. "2Profile of Ethnic Origin and Visible Minorities for Canada, Provinces, Territories and Federal Electoral Districts (2003 Representation Order), 2006 Census". 2.statcan.gc.ca. Archived from the original on October 5, 2013. Retrieved December 2, 2012.
  5. "2006 Census of Canada: Topic-based tabulations | Federal Electoral District (FED) Profile, 2006 Census". 2.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved November 16, 2012.
  6. "2011 Census of Canada: Topic-based tabulations | Detailed Mother Tongue (232), Knowledge of Official Languages (5), Age Groups (17A) and Sex (3) for the Population Excluding Institutional Residents of Canada, Provinces, Territories and Federal Electoral Districts (2003 Representation Order), 2011 Census". 2.statcan.gc.ca. October 24, 2012. Retrieved November 16, 2012.
  7. "Immigrant Status and Place of Birth (38), Sex (3) and Age Groups (10) for the Population of Canada, Provinces, Territories and Federal Electoral Districts (2003 Representation Order), 2006 Census - 20% Sample Data". 2.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved November 23, 2012.
  8. "Appendix J Comparison of places of birth disseminated in 2006, 2001 and 1996". 2.statcan.ca. November 20, 2009. Archived from the original on September 6, 2020. Retrieved November 30, 2012.
  9. Proussalidis, Daniel. "Liberals win seat by 44 votes after recount", Sun News Network, 17 May 2011. (accessed 14 January 2012)
  10. "List of confirmed candidates – September 20, 2021 Federal Election". Elections Canada . Retrieved September 2, 2021.
  11. "List of confirmed candidates". Elections Canada. Retrieved October 4, 2019.
  12. "Candidate Campaign Returns". Elections Canada. Retrieved September 7, 2020.
  13. Elections Canada – Confirmed candidates for Winnipeg North, 30 September 2015
  14. Elections Canada – Preliminary Election Expenses Limits for Candidates
  15. Pundits' Guide to Canadian Elections
  16. Elections Canada accessed May 17, 2011

Sources

Coordinates: 49°55′34″N97°10′26″W / 49.926°N 97.174°W / 49.926; -97.174