Clarksfield (microprocessor)

Last updated
Clarksfield
General Info
Launched2009
Discontinued2012
Designed by Intel
CPUID code106Ex
Product code80607
Performance
Max. CPU clock rate 1.60 GHz to 2.13 (turbo up to 3.33) GHz
Cache
L2 cache4x256kb
L3 cache6 to 8 MB
Architecture and classification
ApplicationMobile
Min. feature size 45 nm
Microarchitecture Nehalem
Instruction set x86, x86-64, MMX, SSE, SSE2, SSE3, SSSE3, SSE4.1, SSE4.2
Physical specifications
Cores
  • 4
Socket(s)
Products, models, variants
Brand name(s)
History

Clarksfield is the code name for an Intel processor, initially sold as mobile Intel Core i7. [1] It is closely related to the desktop Lynnfield processor, both use quad-core dies based on the 45 nm Nehalem microarchitecture and have integrated PCI Express and DMI links.

Contents

The predecessor of Clarksfield, Penryn-QC was a multi-chip module with two dual-core Penryn dies based on Penryn microarchitecture, a shrink of Core microarchitecture. The name of the direct successor of Clarksfield has not been announced. Arrandale is a later mobile processor but opens a new line of mid-range dual-core processors with integrated graphics.

At the time of its release at the Intel Developer Forum on September 23, 2009, Clarksfield processors were significantly faster than any other laptop processor, [2] including the Core 2 Extreme QX9300. The initial laptop manufacturers shipping products based on Clarksfield processors include MSI, Dell/Alienware, Hewlett-Packard, Toshiba and Asustek. [3]

Brand names

As of September 2009, all Clarksfield processors are marketed as Core i7, in three product lines differing in thermal design power and the amount of third-level cache that is enabled. See the respective lists for details about each model.

Brand NameModel (list) L3 Cache size Thermal Design Power
Intel Core i7 i7-7xxQM 6 MB45 W
i7-8xxQM 8 MB
i7-9xxXM Extreme Edition 55 W

See also

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Socket G1

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References