Ultra-low-voltage processor

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AMD Geode processor

Ultra-low-voltage processors (ULV processors) are a class of microprocessor that are deliberately underclocked to consume less power (typically 17 W or below), at the expense of performance.

Contents

These processors are commonly used in subnotebooks, netbooks, ultraportables and embedded devices; where low heat dissipation and long battery life are required.

Notable examples

See also

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