Liberalism in Portugal

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Since the beginning of liberalism in Portugal in the mid-19th century, several parties have, by gaining representation in parliament, continued the liberal ideology in contemporary Portuguese politics.

Liberalism is a political and moral philosophy based on liberty, consent of the governed, and equality before the law. Liberals espouse a wide array of views depending on their understanding of these principles, but they generally support limited government, individual rights, capitalism, democracy, secularism, gender equality, racial equality, internationalism, freedom of speech, freedom of the press and freedom of religion.

Portugal Republic in Southwestern Europe

Portugal, officially the Portuguese Republic, is a country located mostly on the Iberian Peninsula in southwestern Europe. It is the westernmost sovereign state of mainland Europe, being bordered to the west and south by the Atlantic Ocean and to the north and east by Spain. Its territory also includes the Atlantic archipelagos of the Azores and Madeira, both autonomous regions with their own regional governments.

Contents

History

1826 to 1926

From Democratic Group to New Progressive Party

  • 1826: Supporters of the liberal revolution of 1820 establish the Democratic Group (Grupo Democrata)
  • 1840: The party is reorganized into the Progress Party (Partido do Progresso), founded by João de Saldanha
  • 1849: The New Progressive Party merges with the conservative Regenerator Party ( Partido Regenerador )
  • 1851: A faction leaves the party and founds the Progressive Historical Party/Party of Historical Progressives (Partido Progressista Histórico/Partido dos Progressistas Históricos)
  • 1862: The Progressive Historical Party is split into the Reformist Party and the Historical Party (Partido Histórico)
  • 1876: Both parties reunite and merge into the New Progressive Party (Novo Partido Progressista), which eventually develops into a Conservative party
  • 1910: The New Progressive Party dissolves.

Portuguese Republican Party

The Portuguese Republican Party was a Portuguese political party formed during the late years of monarchy that proposed and conducted the substitution of the Constitutional Monarchy by the Portuguese First Republic.

António José de Almeida President of Portugal

António José de Almeida, GCTE, GCA, GCC, GCSE, son of José António de Almeida and his wife Maria Rita das Neves, was a Portuguese political figure. He served as the sixth President of Portugal from 1919 until 1923.

1985 onwards

Social Democratic Party

The Social Democratic Party was a full right member of the Liberal International, from 1985 until 1996. It shifts to the right since Aníbal Cavaco Silva, who served as Prime Minister of Portugal from 1985 to 1995 and President of Portugal from 2006 to 2016.

Social Democratic Party (Portugal) political party in Portugal

The Social Democratic Party, founded as the Democratic Peoples' Party, is a liberal-conservative and liberal political party in Portugal. Commonly known by its colloquial initials PSD, on ballot papers its initials appear as its official form PPD/PSD, with the first three letters coming from the party's original name. Alongside the Socialist Party (PS), the PSD is one of the two major parties in Portuguese politics. Although branded as a social democratic party, the party is in practice a centre-right conservative party.

Liberal International political international federation for liberal political parties

Liberal International (LI) is the political international federation for liberal political parties.

Right-wing politics hold that certain social orders and hierarchies are inevitable, natural, normal, or desirable, typically supporting this position on the basis of natural law, economics, or tradition. Hierarchy and inequality may be viewed as natural results of traditional social differences or the competition in market economies. The term right-wing can generally refer to "the conservative or reactionary section of a political party or system".

Liberal Social Movement

  • 2005: The Social Liberal Movement (Movimento Liberal Social, MLS) is founded as a movement (not a political party). The current president is Miguel Duarte.

Iniciativa Liberal

  • 2017: The Iniciativa Liberal, a classical liberal party, is founded and becomes a full member of the ALDE European Party. The current president is Carlos Guimarães Pinto.

The Liberal Initiative is a liberal political party in Portugal. The party was created as an association in 2016, and approved as a party by the Constitutional Court in 2017 and is expected to run for its first elections in 2019, for the European Parliament elections, the next Portuguese general elections and the Madeira regional elections.

Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe Party European political party

The Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe Party is a European political party mainly active in the European Union, composed of 60 national-level liberal parties from across Europe. On 26 March 1976, it was founded in Stuttgart as a confederation of national political parties under the name Federation of Liberal and Democrat Parties in Europe and renamed European Liberals and Democrats (ELD) in 1977 and European Liberal Democrats and Reformists (ELDR) in 1986. On 30 April 2004, the ELDR was reformed as an official European party, the European Liberal Democrat and Reform Party. The ALDE Party is affiliated with the Liberal International and a recognised European political party, incorporated as a non-profit association under Belgian law.

See also

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