Mount Thule

Last updated
Mount Thule
Highest point
Elevation 1,711 m (5,614 ft)
Coordinates 73°01′01″N078°25′01″W / 73.01694°N 78.41694°W / 73.01694; -78.41694 (Mount Thule) Coordinates: 73°01′01″N078°25′01″W / 73.01694°N 78.41694°W / 73.01694; -78.41694 (Mount Thule)
Geography
Location Bylot Island, Nunavut, Canada
Parent range Baffin Mountains

Mount Thule is a mountain on Bylot Island, Nunavut, Canada. It is located 38 km (24 mi) north of Pond Inlet on Baffin Island. It is associated with the Baffin Mountains which in turn form part of the Arctic Cordillera mountain system. [1]

Mountain A large landform that rises fairly steeply above the surrounding land over a limited area

A mountain is a large landform that rises above the surrounding land in a limited area, usually in the form of a peak. A mountain is generally steeper than a hill. Mountains are formed through tectonic forces or volcanism. These forces can locally raise the surface of the earth. Mountains erode slowly through the action of rivers, weather conditions, and glaciers. A few mountains are isolated summits, but most occur in huge mountain ranges.

Bylot Island island in Nunavut, Canada

Bylot Island lies off the northern end of Baffin Island in Nunavut Territory, Canada. Eclipse Sound to the southeast and Navy Board Inlet to the southwest separate it from Baffin Island. Parry Channel lies to its northwest. At 11,067 km2 (4,273 sq mi) it is ranked 71st largest island in the world and Canada's 17th largest island. The island measures 180 km (110 mi) east to west and 110 km (68 mi) north to south and is one of the largest uninhabited islands in the world. While there are no permanent settlements on this Canadian Arctic island, Inuit from Pond Inlet and elsewhere regularly travel to Bylot Island. An Inuit seasonal hunting camp is located southwest of Cape Graham Moore.

Nunavut Territory of Canada

Nunavut is the newest, largest, and most northerly territory of Canada. It was separated officially from the Northwest Territories on April 1, 1999, via the Nunavut Act and the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement Act, though the boundaries had been drawn in 1993. The creation of Nunavut resulted in the first major change to Canada's political map since the incorporation of the province of Newfoundland in 1949.

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Mount Asgard mountain in Canada

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Mount Thor mountain in Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

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Qiajivik Mountain mountain in Canada

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Baffin Mountains mountain range in northern Canada

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Mount Odin mountain in Qikiqtaaluk, Nunavut, Canada

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Byam Martin Mountains

The Byam Martin Mountains are a rugged mountain range extending east to west across Bylot Island, Nunavut, Canada. It is one of the most northern ranges in the world and is an extension of the Baffin Mountains which in turn form part of the Arctic Cordillera mountain system. The highest mountain in the range is Angilaaq Mountain, 1,951 m (6,401 ft), located near the island's center. Sharp peaks and ridges, divided by deep glacier-filled valleys are typical features in the range and has been extensively modified by glacial erosion. The Byam Martin Mountains have not been conducive to habitation. While there are no permanent settlements in the Byam Martin Mountains, Inuit from Pond Inlet and elsewhere regularly travel to the range.

Cirque Mountain is a mountain located 11 km (7 mi) northeast of Mount Caubvick, Labrador, Canada. It is the third highest mountain in Labrador, after Caubvick (1,652 m) and Torngarsoak Mountain (1,595 m), and lies in the Selamiut Range, which is a subrange of the Torngat Mountains. Before 1971, it was believed that Cirque Mountain was the highest peak, in Canada, east of the Rocky Mountains and south of Baffin Island.

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Mount Baldr mountain in Nunavut

Mount Baldr is a mountain on Baffin Island, located 49 km (30 mi) northeast of Pangnirtung, Nunavut, Canada. It lies in the southern Baffin Mountains, which in turn form part of the Arctic Cordillera mountain system. Like nearby Breidablik Peak and Mount Odin and other peaks in the Arctic Cordillera, its name comes from Norse mythology. It is named after Baldr, a god in Germanic paganism and is Odin's second son.

Akshayuk Pass

Akshayuk Pass, formerly known as Pangnirtung Pass, is a mountain pass in the Baffin Mountains, Nunavut, Canada. It is part of the Auyuittuq National Park area.

Mount Battle mountain in Canada

Mount Battle is a mountain located 65 km (40 mi) northeast of Pangnirtung on Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada. It is with the Baffin Mountains which in turn form part of the Arctic Cordillera mountain system.

Mount Nukap mountain in Canada

Mount Nukap is a mountain associated with the Baffin Mountains on Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada.

Mallik Island geographical object

Mallik Island is one of the uninhabited Canadian arctic islands of Qikiqtaaluk Region, Nunavut, Canada. It is located in Hudson Strait between Baffin Island's Foxe Peninsula and Dorset Island. Mallik Island and Dorset Island are joined together by sand and boulders. Cape Dorset, an Inuit hamlet, is approximately 4.5 km (2.8 mi) away.

References

  1. Mount Thule in the Canadian Mountain Encyclopedia