Rota (papal signature)

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Rota of Pope Alexander III, AD 1175 Alexander III Rota.png
Rota of Pope Alexander III, AD 1175

The rota is one of the symbols used by the Pope to authenticate documents such as papal bulls. It is a cross inscribed in two concentric circles. Pope Leo IX was the first pope to use it.

Contents

The four inner quadrants contain: "Petrus", "Paulus", the Pope's name, and the Pope's ordinal number. The Pope's autograph or motto is sometimes inscribed between the concentric circles.

A rota was also used by monarchs for the authentication of documents and diplomas. [1]

See also

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References

  1. For instance, it was used by William I of Sicily and William II of Sicily: Antonia Gransden, Legends, Traditions, and History in Medieval England, Continuum International Publishing Group, 1992, p. 184.