Thomas W. Clyde (skipjack)

Last updated
THOMAS W. CLYDE

Skipjack Thomas W. Clyde.jpg

Thomas W. Clyde in front of a workboat at Knapp's Narrows, Maryland
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Location Lower Thorofare, Wenona, Maryland
Coordinates 38°7′41″N75°56′54″W / 38.12806°N 75.94833°W / 38.12806; -75.94833 Coordinates: 38°7′41″N75°56′54″W / 38.12806°N 75.94833°W / 38.12806; -75.94833
Area less than one acre
Built 1911 (1911)
Architectural style Skipjack
MPS Chesapeake Bay Skipjack Fleet TR
NRHP reference # 85001084 [1]
Added to NRHP May 16, 1985

The Thomas W. Clyde is a Chesapeake Bay skipjack, normally ported at Deal Island, Maryland. Built at Oriole, Maryland in 1911, the Clyde is one of nineteen surviving skipjacks built before 1912. [2]

Chesapeake Bay An estuary in the U.S. states of Maryland and Virginia

The Chesapeake Bay is an estuary in the U.S. states of Maryland and Virginia. The Bay is located in the Mid-Atlantic region and is primarily separated from the Atlantic Ocean by the Delmarva Peninsula with its mouth located between Cape Henry and Cape Charles. With its northern portion in Maryland and the southern part in Virginia, the Chesapeake Bay is a very important feature for the ecology and economy of those two states, as well as others. More than 150 major rivers and streams flow into the Bay's 64,299-square-mile (166,534 km2) drainage basin, which covers parts of six states and all of Washington, D.C.

Skipjack (boat) type of fishing boat

The skipjack is a traditional fishing boat used on the Chesapeake Bay for oyster dredging. It is a sailboat which succeeded the bugeye as the chief oystering boat on the bay, and it remains in service due to laws restricting the use of powerboats in the Maryland state oyster fishery.

Deal Island, Maryland CDP in Maryland, United States

Deal Island is a census-designated place (CDP) in Somerset County, Maryland, United States. The population was 578 at the 2000 census. It is included in the Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware Metropolitan Statistical Area. The small town was listed on the National Register of Historic Places as the Deal Island Historic District in 2006.

She was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1985. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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Claud W. Somers is a Chesapeake Bay skipjack, built in 1911 in Young's Creek, Virginia, by W. Thomas Young of Parksley, who also built Bernice J.. She is ported at the Reedville Fisherman's Museum in Reedville, Virginia. In 1977 Claude W. Somers was struck by a squall near Hooper Strait Light, leaving six drowned, including her owner-captain.

<i>Bernice J.</i> Chesapeake Bay skipjack

Bernice J. is a Chesapeake Bay skipjack, built in 1904 in Young's Creek, Virginia, by W. Thomas Young of Parksley, who also built Claude W. Somers. She is a 42-foot-long (13 m) two-sail bateau, or "V"-bottomed deadrise type of centerboard sloop, commonly referred to as a skipjack. She worked dredging oysters through the 1970s. She is located at Chestertown, Kent County, Maryland.

Wenona, Maryland Unincorporated community in Maryland, United States

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Maggie Lee (skipjack)

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Minnie V (skipjack)

The Minnie V is a Chesapeake Bay skipjack, built in 1906 at Wenona, Maryland. She is a 45.3' long two-sail bateau, or "V"-bottomed deadrise type of centerboard sloop. She has a beam of 15.7' and a depth of 3' with a net registered tonnage of 8 tons. She is one of the 35 surviving traditional Chesapeake Bay skipjacks and a member of the last commercial sailing fleet in the United States. She is located at Tilghman, Talbot County, Maryland.

Nellie L. Byrd (skipjack)

The Nellie L. Byrd is a Chesapeake Bay skipjack, built in 1911 at Oriole, Maryland. She is a 53.6' long two-sail bateau, or "V"-bottomed deadrise type of centerboard sloop. She has a beam of 26.7', a depth of 4.8', and a net tonnage of 18 tons. She is one of the 35 surviving traditional Chesapeake Bay skipjacks and a member of the last commercial sailing fleet in the United States. When listed, she was located at Tilghman, Talbot County, Maryland. Since 2005, she is located at Middle River, Maryland, Baltimore County, Maryland.

Ralph T. Webster (skipjack)

The Ralph T. Webster is a Chesapeake Bay skipjack, built in 1905 at Oriole, Maryland. She is a 47.7' long two-sail bateau, or "V"-bottomed deadrise type of centerboard sloop. She has a beam of 15.3' and a depth of 3.5', with net registered tonnage of 8 tons. She one of the 35 surviving traditional Chesapeake Bay skipjacks and a member of the last commercial sailing fleet in the United States. She is located at Tilghman, Talbot County, Maryland.

Reliance (skipjack) Chesapeake Bay skipjack

The Reliance is a Chesapeake Bay skipjack, built in 1904 at Fishing Creek, Maryland. She is a 41-foot-long (12 m) two-sail bateau, or "V"-bottomed deadrise type of centerboard sloop. Her beam is 14 feet (4.3 m) and her draft is 2 feet (0.61 m). She one of the 35 surviving traditional Chesapeake Bay skipjacks and a member of the last commercial sailing fleet in the United States. She is located at Tilghman, Talbot County, Maryland.

Stanley Norman (skipjack)

The Stanley Norman is a Chesapeake Bay skipjack, built in 1902 at Salisbury, Maryland. She is a 47.5-foot-long (14.5 m) two-sail bateau, or "V"-bottomed deadrise type of centerboard sloop. She has a beam of 16 feet (4.9 m), a depth of 4 feet (1.2 m) at the stern with the centerboard up, and a registered tonnage of 7 tons. She is one of the 35 surviving traditional Chesapeake Bay skipjacks and a member of the last commercial sailing fleet in the United States. She is located at St. Michaels, Talbot County, Maryland.

<i>Virginia W</i>

The Virginia W is a Chesapeake Bay skipjack, built in 1904 at Guilford, Virginia. She is a 37.5-foot-long (11.4 m) two-sail bateau, or "V"-bottomed deadrise type of centerboard sloop. Her beam is 13.5 feet (4.1 m), and she draws 3.3 feet (1.0 m) with centerboard up, 6 feet (1.8 m) with centerboard down. She is one of the 35 surviving traditional Chesapeake Bay skipjacks and a member of the last commercial sailing fleet in the United States. She is located at Cambridge, Maryland, Dorchester County.

Elsworth (skipjack)

The Elsworth is a Chesapeake Bay skipjack, built in 1901 at Hudson, Maryland. She is a 39.9-foot-long (12.2 m) two-sail bateau, or "V"-bottomed deadrise type of centerboard sloop. She has a beam of 14.3', a depth of 3.1', and a gross registered tonnage of 8 tons. She is one of the 35 surviving traditional Chesapeake Bay skipjacks and a member of the last commercial sailing fleet in the United States.

Sigsbee (skipjack)

The Sigsbee is a Chesapeake Bay skipjack, built in 1901 at Deal Island, Maryland, United States. She is a 47-foot-long (14 m) two-sail bateau, or "V"-bottomed deadrise type of centerboard sloop. She has a beam of 15.8 feet (4.8 m), a depth of 3.8 feet (1.2 m), and a gross registered tonnage of 8 tons. She is one of the 35 surviving traditional Chesapeake Bay skipjacks and a member of the last commercial sailing fleet in the United States. She is owned and operated by the Living Classrooms Foundation in Baltimore, Maryland.

Clarence Crockett

(in Italian)Clarence Crockett is a Chesapeake Bay skipjack, built in 1908 at Deep Creek, Virginia. She is a 44.6-foot-long (13.6 m) two-sail bateau, or "V"-bottomed deadrise type of centerboard sloop. She has a beam of 14.7 feet (4.5 m) and a depth of 3.0 feet (0.91 m) with a net registered tonnage of 7. She is one of the 35 surviving traditional Chesapeake Bay skipjacks and a member of the last commercial sailing fleet in the United States. She is located at Wenona, Somerset County, Maryland.

F. C. Lewis Jr. (skipjack)

The F. C. Lewis Jr. is a Chesapeake Bay skipjack, built in 1907 at Hopkins, Virginia. She is a 39-foot-long (12 m) two-sail bateau, or "V"-bottomed deadrise type of centerboard sloop. She has a beam of 14.6 feet (4.5 m) and a register depth of 3 feet (0.91 m); her register tonnage is 6. She is one of the 35 surviving traditional Chesapeake Bay skipjacks and a member of the last commercial sailing fleet in the United States. She is located at Wenona, Somerset County, Maryland.

Fannie L. Daugherty (skipjack)

The Fannie L. Daugherty is a Chesapeake Bay skipjack, built in 1904 at Crisfield, Maryland. She is a 41.3-foot-long (12.6 m) two-sail bateau, or "V"-bottomed deadrise type of centerboard sloop. She is built by cross-planked construction methods and has a beam of 8 feet (2.4 m) and a depth of 3.6 feet (1.1 m). She one of the 35 surviving traditional Chesapeake Bay skipjacks and a member of the last commercial sailing fleet in the United States. She is located at Wenona, Somerset County, Maryland.

<i>Ida May</i> (skipjack) Chesapeake Bay skipjack, built in 1906 at Urbanna or Deep Creek, Virginia

The Ida May is a Chesapeake Bay skipjack, built in 1906 at Urbanna or Deep Creek, Virginia. She is a 42.2-foot-long (12.9 m) two-sail bateau, or "V"-bottomed deadrise type of centerboard sloop. She has a beam of 14.4 feet (4.4 m), a depth of 3.3 feet (1.0 m), and a net register tonnage of 7. She is one of the 35 surviving traditional Chesapeake Bay skipjacks and a member of the last commercial sailing fleet in the United States. She is located at Chance, Somerset County, Maryland.

Sea Gull (skipjack) Chesapeake Bay skipjack, built in 1924 at Crisfield, Maryland

The Sea Gull is a Chesapeake Bay skipjack, built in 1924 at Crisfield, Maryland. She is a 46.6-foot-long (14.2 m) two-sail bateau, or "V"-bottomed deadrise type of centerboard sloop. She has a beam of 15.9 feet (4.8 m), a depth of 4.3 feet (1.3 m), and a net register tonnage of 10. She is one of the 35 surviving traditional Chesapeake Bay skipjacks and a member of the last commercial sailing fleet in the United States. She is located at Deal Island, Somerset County, Maryland.

Susan May (skipjack)

The Sea Gull is a Chesapeake Bay skipjack, built in 1901 at Pocomoke City, Maryland. She is a 46-foot-long (14 m) two-sail bateau, or "V"-bottomed deadrise type of centerboard sloop. She has a beam of 15.9 feet (4.8 m) and a depth of 1.6 feet (0.49 m); her gross tonnage is 10 register tons. She is one of the 35 surviving traditional Chesapeake Bay skipjacks and a member of the last commercial sailing fleet in the United States. She is located at Wenona, Somerset County, Maryland.

Mary W. Somers (skipjack)

The Mary W. Somers is a Chesapeake Bay skipjack, built in 1904 at Mearsville, Virginia. She is a 41.9-foot-long (12.8 m) two-sail bateau, or "V"-bottomed deadrise type of centerboard sloop. She is one of the 35 surviving traditional Chesapeake Bay skipjacks and a member of the last commercial sailing fleet in the United States. She is located at St. Marys City, St. Mary's County, Maryland.

<i>Martha Lewis</i> (skipjack)

Martha Lewis is a Chesapeake Bay skipjack built in 1955. Her home port is Havre de Grace, Harford County, Maryland.

References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. M.E. Hayward and Anne Witty (May 1984). "National Register of Historic Places Registration: Thomas W. Clyde (skipjack)" (PDF). Maryland Historical Trust. Retrieved 2016-03-01.
Stern of the Clyde with a pushboat Skipjack Thomas W. Clyde 2.jpg
Stern of the Clyde with a pushboat