2025 Western Australian state election

Last updated
2025 Western Australian state election
Flag of Western Australia.svg
  2021 8 March 20252029 

All 59 seats in the Western Australian Legislative Assembly
and all 36 members in the Western Australian Legislative Council
Opinion polls
  Mark McGowan headshot.jpg
NAT
LIB
Leader Mark McGowan Mia Davies David Honey
Party Labor National Liberal
Leader since23 January 201221 March 201723 March 2021
Leader's seat Rockingham Central Wheatbelt Cottesloe
Last election53 seats4 seats2 seats
Current seats53 seats4 seats2 seats
Seats neededSteady2.svgIncrease2.svg 26Increase2.svg 28

Incumbent Premier

Mark McGowan
Labor


The 2025 Western Australian state election is scheduled to be held on 8 March 2025 to elect members to the Parliament of Western Australia, where all 59 seats in the Legislative Assembly and all 36 seats in the Legislative Council will be up for election.

Contents

Candidates will be elected to single-member seats in the Legislative Assembly via full-preferential instant-runoff voting. In the Legislative Council, six candidates will be elected in each of the six electoral regions through the single transferable vote system with group voting tickets. The election will be conducted by the Western Australian Electoral Commission.

Background

The 2021 state election saw Labor win one of the most comprehensive victories on record at the state or territory level in Australia. It won 53 of the 59 seats that was the party's strongest result ever, and the largest government seat tally and largest government majority in Western Australian parliamentary history. [1] [2]

Electoral system

Candidates are elected to single-member seats in the Legislative Assembly via full-preferential instant-runoff voting. In the Legislative Council, six candidates are elected in each of the six electoral regions through the single transferable vote system with group voting tickets. [3]

Key dates

Elections are scheduled for the second Saturday of March every four years, in line with legislative changes made in 2011. [4]

While a fixed-term exists, the Governor of Western Australia may still dissolve the Assembly and call an election early on the advice of the Premier. [5]

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References

  1. WA Election 2021 ABC News
  2. Mark McGowan leads Labor landslide in WA as Liberals' worst fears are realised The Guardian 13 March 2021
  3. Voting Systems in WA Western Australian Electoral Commission
  4. "State Elections". Western Australia Electoral Commission. Retrieved 26 April 2021.
  5. Electoral and Constitution Amendment Act 2011 (WA), section 5