Farrell, Pennsylvania

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Farrell, Pennsylvania
Independent Draft Gear and its neighbors, Farrell.jpg
Mill on Pennsylvania Routes 718/760
Etymology: James A. Farrell
Mercer County Pennsylvania Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Farrell Highlighted.svg
Location of Farrell in Mercer County, Pennsylvania.
USA Pennsylvania location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Farrell, Pennsylvania
Location of Farrell within Pennsylvania
Coordinates: 41°12′42″N80°29′39″W / 41.21167°N 80.49417°W / 41.21167; -80.49417 Coordinates: 41°12′42″N80°29′39″W / 41.21167°N 80.49417°W / 41.21167; -80.49417
CountryUnited States
StatePennsylvania
County Mercer
Established1899
Incorporated (borough)1916
Incorporated (city)1932
Government
  MayorKimberly Doss
Area
[1]
  Total2.27 sq mi (5.89 km2)
  Land2.26 sq mi (5.86 km2)
  Water0.01 sq mi (0.02 km2)
Population
 (2010)
  Total5,111
  Estimate 
(2019) [2]
4,580
  Density2,022.97/sq mi (781.03/km2)
Time zone UTC-4 (EST)
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (EDT)
Zip code
16121
Area code(s) 724
FIPS code 42-25360
Website www.cityoffarrell.com

Farrell is a city in Mercer County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 5,111 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, OH-PA Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Contents

History

Once dubbed "The Magic City," Farrell sprung up practically overnight when a steel mill was constructed in 1901 on a plain bordering the Shenango River, near Sharon, Pennsylvania, in what was then part of Hickory Township (now Hermitage).

The community name was at the beginning South Sharon. In 1912, the population reached 10,000. At that time the residents of the new city elected to take the name of Farrell, after industrialist James A. Farrell. [3]

The community was incorporated as the Borough of South Sharon in 1916; its population peaked at over 15,000 in 1920 and its status was elevated to a third-class city in 1932. [3] In 1939, artist Virginia Wood Riggs was commissioned to paint the mural Myths of Vulcan and Juno in the towns post office. The mural was painted over in 1966. [4]

The mill, which eventually became known as the Roemer Works of Sharon Steel Corporation, would serve as the community's lifeblood until 1992, when it was liquidated after filing bankruptcy. Many of the assets were sold at auction to Britain-based Caparo Corporation and later to Swiss steelmaker Duferco, which operates the plant today. Farrell was designated a financially distressed municipality in 1987 by the state of Pennsylvania.

Despite years of population and industrial decline, Farrell has made progress in rebuilding itself due to new industrial investments on tax abated land and several new housing starts. [ citation needed ]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1910 10,190
1920 15,58653.0%
1930 14,359−7.9%
1940 13,899−3.2%
1950 13,644−1.8%
1960 13,7931.1%
1970 11,000−20.2%
1980 8,645−21.4%
1990 6,841−20.9%
2000 6,050−11.6%
2010 5,111−15.5%
2019 (est.)4,580 [2] −10.4%
Sources: [5] [6] [7] [8]

As of the census [7] of 2000, there were 6,050 people, 2,504 households, and 1,620 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,589.1 people per square mile (998.3/km2). There were 2,752 housing units at an average density of 1,177.7 per square mile (454.1/km2). The racial composition of the city was 50.28% White, 46.71% African American, 0.12% Native American, 0.20% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.30% from other races, and 2.38% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.66% of the population.

There were 2,504 households, out of which 27.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.0% were married couples living together, 24.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.3% were non-families. 31.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 17.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 2.96.

In the city the population was spread out, with 25.6% under the age of 18, 7.4% from 18 to 24, 23.6% from 25 to 44, 20.8% from 45 to 64, and 22.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 80.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 74.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $22,659, and the median income for a family was $28,935. Males had a median income of $32,800 versus $20,729 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,532. About 24.0% of families and 26.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 47.5% of those under age 18 and 9.6% of those age 65 or over.

Economy

The city government provides numerous incentives to entice new businesses to locate within its borders. Today, some of the major contributors to Farrell's business base include:

Farrell emerged Feb. 8, 2019 from Act 47 provisions. The Act provides for municipalities that are near bankruptcy. Farrell had been under Act 47 since 1987, as Pennsylvania's first municipality to enter financially distressed municipality status. [10]

Notable people

Broadcast media

Television

Because of Farrell's location near the Pennsylvania/Ohio border, it is served by WKBN-TV (CBS), WFMJ-TV (NBC), WYTV (ABC), WYFX-LD (Fox) and WBCB (CW), all broadcast from nearby Youngstown, OH.

Radio

Farrell is served by AM radio stations such as WLOA (1470 AM) (Farrell, PA), WPIC (790 AM) (Sharon, PA), WKBN (570 AM) (Youngstown, OH) and FM radio stations such as WYFM/"Y-103" (102.9 FM) (Sharon, PA), WLLF/"The River" (96.7 FM) (Mercer, PA), WYLE/"Willie 95.1" (95.1 FM) (Grove City, PA), WMXY/"Mix 98.9" (98.9 FM) (Youngstown, OH).

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References

  1. "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 28, 2020.
  2. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  3. 1 2 (Farrell Golden Jubilee 1901-1951.)
  4. Park, Marlene and Gerald E. Markowitz, Democratic vistas: Post Offices and Public Art in the New Deal, Temple University Press, Philadelphia 1984
  5. "Number of Inhabitants: Pennsylvania" (PDF). 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013.
  6. "Pennsylvania: Population and Housing Unit Counts" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013.
  7. 1 2 "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  8. "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population". U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 19 October 2013. Retrieved 22 November 2013.
  9. Khalid, Asma (2018-06-08). "Trump's Tariffs Worry A Small Steel City In Pennsylvania". National Public Radio . Retrieved 2018-06-12.
  10. Poole, Eric. "Farrell leaves Act 47 after more than 30 years".
  11. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-11-29. Retrieved 2013-07-18.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  12. "Neal Russo - BR Bullpen". www.baseball-reference.com.