Hard Knott

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Hard Knott
Lake District National Park UK relief location map.png
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Hard Knott
Location in the Lake District
Location relief map Borough of Copeland.svg
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Hard Knott
Location in Copeland Borough
Highest point
Elevation 549 m (1,801 ft)
Prominence 154 m (505 ft)
Parent peak Scafell Pike
Listing Marilyn, Wainwright
Coordinates 54°24′37″N3°11′11″W / 54.41032°N 3.18634°W / 54.41032; -3.18634 Coordinates: 54°24′37″N3°11′11″W / 54.41032°N 3.18634°W / 54.41032; -3.18634
Geography
Location Cumbria, England
Parent range Lake District, Southern Fells
OS grid NY231023
Topo map OS Landrangers 89, 90, Explorer OL6

Hard Knott is a fell in the English Lake District, at the head of Eskdale.

Contents

Geology

Rhyolitic lava-like tuff of the Bad Step Tuff forms the summit rocks with the dacitic lapilli-tuffs of the Lincomb Tarns Formation to the north west. Border end shows outcropping plagioclase-phyric andesite lavas of the Birker Fell Formation. [1]

Summit

Hard Knott reaches a height of 549 metres (1,803 feet), the summit knoll bearing a cairn. There are other named tops on the ridge in addition to the summit, with Yew Bank to the north and Border End to the south. Hard Knott is famous for its superb view of the Scafell massif to the north, while Harter Fell dominates the vista to the south. For a fabulous view of Eskdale it is recommended that the walker visits Border End half a mile to the south of the main summit. [2] [3]

Ascents

The fell is usually climbed from the top of the Hardknott Pass where there are several parking spaces. It is also possible to begin the ascent from the foot of the pass in Eskdale, although this will triple the length of the walk and the height gained. However, the best plan is probably to climb Hard Knott in conjunction with the neighbouring fell of Harter Fell making a horseshoe walk starting and finishing in Eskdale. From the top of the pass it is a short ascent to the fell summit following an electric fence that skirts to the right of the dangerous looking Raven Crag and takes the walker to the summit in a short time. Other possible routes include a pathless ascent from the Esk via The Steeple, a circuitous walk via the head of Moasdale and an ascent of the eastern flanks via Dod Pike. [2]

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References

  1. British Geological Survey: 1:50,000 series maps, England & Wales Sheet 38: BGS (1998)
  2. 1 2 Richards, Mark: Mid-Western Fells: Collins (2004): ISBN   0-00-711368-4
  3. Alfred Wainwright: A Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells , Book 4: ISBN   0-7112-2457-9
Panorama shot from the summit of Hard Knott showing from left to right the fells of Slight Side, Scafell, Scafell Pike, Great End, Esk Pike, Bow Fell and Crinkle Crags. Scafells from Hard Knott 3.jpg
Panorama shot from the summit of Hard Knott showing from left to right the fells of Slight Side, Scafell, Scafell Pike, Great End, Esk Pike, Bow Fell and Crinkle Crags.