Nachchaduwa wewa

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Nachchaduwa wewa
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Nachchaduwa wewa
Location Anuradhapura
Coordinates 05°15′09.8″N80°29′05.5″E / 5.252722°N 80.484861°E / 5.252722; 80.484861 Coordinates: 05°15′09.8″N80°29′05.5″E / 5.252722°N 80.484861°E / 5.252722; 80.484861
Type Reservoir
Native nameනාච්චාදූව වැව  (Sinhala)
Catchment area 623 km2 (241 sq mi)
Water volume55,700,000 cu ft (1,580,000 m3)

Nachchaduwa wewa (Also known as Mahadaragala Reservoir) [1] is a reservoir near Thammannakulama, Sri Lanka. The reservoir is used to store water brings from Kala Wewa through Yoda Ela channel. [2] [3] The reservoir was severely damaged in 1957 flood and the restoration of the tank was completed in 1958. [4]

History

This tank is believed to be one of the sixteen large reservoirs built by King Mahasen (277 – 304). [5] It is said that he built this tank to supply water to the city and to safeguard the city from floods. [3] However the chronicle Mahavamsa have made a reference to this reservoir during the time of King Moggallana II (540 - 560). [6]

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Konduwattuwana Wewa

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Yodha Ela

Yoda Ela or Jaya Ganga, an 87 km (54 mi) long single banking water canal carrying excess water from Kala wawa reservoir to Thisa wawa reservoir in Anuradhapura. The Yodha Ela is known for achieving a rather low gradient for its time. The gradient is about 10 centimetres per kilometre or 6 inches per mile.

References

  1. "Constructions of King Mahasen/Mahadaragala Reservoir: (Nachchaduwa Reservoir)". mahavamsa.org. Retrieved 16 May 2016.
  2. "Overview". Nachchaduwa divisional secretariat. Retrieved 16 May 2016.
  3. 1 2 "Lower Malwathu Oya project – A series of misconception errors". Daily FT. 12 September 2017. Retrieved 2 May 2020.
  4. "Nachchaduwa wewa". Sunday Observer. 29 May 2011. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 16 May 2016.
  5. "Nachchaduwa wewa". Lanka Pradeepa. 30 March 2019. Retrieved 2 May 2020.
  6. "Nachchaduwa Tank – නාච්චාදූව වැව". Amazing Lanka. Retrieved 16 May 2016.