Parakrama Samudra

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Parakrama Samudraya
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Parakrama Samudraya
Location sri lanka
Coordinates 7°54′N80°58′E / 7.900°N 80.967°E / 7.900; 80.967 Coordinates: 7°54′N80°58′E / 7.900°N 80.967°E / 7.900; 80.967
Type reservoir
Catchment area 75×10^6 m2 (75 km2; 29 sq mi)
Basin  countriesSri Lanka
Surface area22.6×10^6 m2 (22.6 km2; 8.7 sq mi)
Average depth5 m (16 ft)
Max. depth12.7 m (42 ft)
Surface elevation58.5 m (192 ft)

Parakrama Samudra (or King Parakrama's sea or the Sea of King Parakrama) is a shallow reservoir (wewa), consisting of five separate wewa (reservoirs) (thopa, dumbutulu, erabadu, bhu, kalahagala tanks) connected by narrow channels in Polonnaruwa, Sri Lanka.

The northernmost reservoir is the oldest and referred to as Topa wewa (Sinhalese wewa is almost equal to English word lake or reservoir, but used unique Sri Lankan technology) built around 386 AD. The middle section Eramudu wewa and the southernmost portion, at the highest elevation, is Dumbutula wewa, both sections were added and the reservoir expanded during the reign of King Parâkramabâhu I. [1] This wewa (reservoir) was built under the quote "do not let even a drop of rain water in this country to go to the sea without use". The wewa (reservoir) was so large it was called samudhraya or ocean but there was another reason it was called that due to the wind we know that waves erupt in tanks, parakrama samudhraya was so large the waves come as big as the ocean waves.

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References

  1. PARAKRAMA SAMUDRA (LAKE PARAKRAMA) - International Lake Environment Committee