Broadlands Dam

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Broadlands Dam
UG-LK Photowalk - 2018-03-24 - Broadlands Dam (7).jpg
Country Sri Lanka
Location Kitulgala
Coordinates 06°58′44″N80°27′16″E / 6.97889°N 80.45444°E / 6.97889; 80.45444 Coordinates: 06°58′44″N80°27′16″E / 6.97889°N 80.45444°E / 6.97889; 80.45444
Purpose Power
StatusUnder construction
Construction began17 July 2013 (2013-07-17)
Opening date2020
Construction cost US$82 million
Dam and spillways
Type of dam Gravity dam
Impounds Maskeliya Oya
Height (thalweg)24 m (79 ft)
Length114 m (374 ft)
Reservoir
Total capacity198,000 m3 (7,000,000 cu ft)
Catchment area 201 km2 (78 sq mi)
Normal elevation122 m (400 ft)
Coordinates 06°59′01″N80°25′34″E / 6.98361°N 80.42611°E / 6.98361; 80.42611
Operator(s) CEB
Turbines 2 x 17.5 MW
Installed capacity 35 MW
Annual generation 126 GWh
Website
http://www.bhpceb.lk/

The Broadlands Dam (also known as the Broadlands Hydropower Project by the developers) is a 35 MW run-of-the-river hydroelectric complex currently under construction in Kitulgala, Sri Lanka. The project is expected to be completed in 2020, and will consist of two dams, and a power station further downstream. [1] [2]

Contents

With an estimated annual generation capacity of 126 GWh , the facility will be the country's last major hydroelectric project, due to the exhaustion of island-wide hydropower potential. Construction of the project was ceremonially inaugurated by the Minister of Power and Energy Mrs. Pavithra Wanniarachchi at the auspicious time of 11:01 on 17 July 2013. [3] [4]

Approximately 85% of the US$82 million project funding was met via credit arrangements made with the Chinese government, with the rest borne via a loan from the local Hatton National Bank. [5] [6] [7] The construction contract of the project was granted to the China National Electric Equipment Corporation (CNEEC). [8]

Dams and reservoirs

The primary gravity dam measuring 24 m (79 ft) in height and 114 m (374 ft) in length is being constructed across the Maskeliya Oya at Kitulgala, and will supply water to the power station via a 3,404.7 m (11,170.3 ft) penstock measuring 5.4 m (17.7 ft) in diameter. [9]

A secondary gravity weir, measuring 19 m (62 ft) and 48 m (157 ft) in height and length, is also to be built in the vicinity, over the nearby Kehelgamu Oya, to provide additional hydroelectric capacity. The weir, to be called the Kehelgamu Weir, will create a catchment area of 176 km2 (68 sq mi), and will provide additional head to the penstock of the main dam via a 811 m (2,661 ft) tunnel. [9]

The penstock from the main dam will feed a power station consisting of two 3-phase synchronous turbines, each of 17.5 MW and a rated discharge of 32 m3 (1,130 cu ft) per second. [9]

The dam under construction in March 2018. UG-LK Photowalk - 2018-03-24 - Broadlands Dam (3).jpg
The dam under construction in March 2018.
Intake structure. UG-LK Photowalk - 2018-03-24 - Broadlands Dam (8).jpg
Intake structure.

See also

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References

  1. "Broadlands Hydropower project work begins on Monday". Ceylon Today. 14 July 2013. Retrieved 2 October 2013.
  2. "Broadlands hydro power project construction work inaugurated". Daily News . 16 July 2013. Retrieved 2 October 2013.
  3. "Broadlands hydro power project to be constructed". Sunday Observer . 14 July 2013. Archived from the original on 4 October 2013. Retrieved 2 October 2013.
  4. "Major Projects: Broadlands Hydro Power Project". Ceylon Electricity Board. Archived from the original on 12 November 2012. Retrieved 2 October 2013.
  5. "Construction of Broadlands Hydropower Project in Sri Lanka to start on 14th July". ColomboPage.com. 10 June 2013. Retrieved 2 October 2013.
  6. "Sri Lanka to speed up the construction of 'Broadland' hydropower project". LBR.lk. 7 May 2013. Archived from the original on 4 October 2013. Retrieved 2 October 2013.
  7. "HNB finances 15% of mega Broadlands Hydro-Power Project". FT.lk. 25 June 2013. Archived from the original on 4 October 2013. Retrieved 2 October 2013.
  8. "Broadlands 35MW hydro power project to begin in May?". The Island . Retrieved 2 October 2013.
  9. 1 2 3 "About the Broadlands Hydropower Project". BHPCEB.lk. Archived from the original on 4 October 2013. Retrieved 2 October 2013.