Single-blade propeller

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A single-blade propeller may be used on aircraft to generate thrust. Normally propellers are multiblades but the simplicity of a single-blade propeller fits well on motorized gliders, because it permits the design of a smaller aperture of the glider fuselage for retraction of the powerplant. The counterbalanced teetering mono-blade propeller generates fewer vibrations than conventional multiblade configurations.[ citation needed ] Often, single blade propeller configurations are touted as having a much greater efficiency than multiblade propellers, but this is a falsehood outside the inertial losses in spinning a heavier propeller, and the minimal additional drag from added blades.[ citation needed ] Single bladed propellers are principally used to fulfill engineering requirements that fall outside the scope of efficiency.

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Patents

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See also

Samara (fruit) single blade-like seed which autorotates in Nature.


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