States of Sudan

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States of Sudan
الولايات السودانية(in Arabic)
Northern Sudan states numbered.svg
Category Federated state
Location Republic of the Sudan
Number18 states
Populations832,112 (Blue Nile) – 5,274,371 (Khartoum)
Areas22,140 km2 (8,549 sq mi) (Khartoum) – 348,770 km2 (134,659 sq mi) (Northern)
Government
Subdivisions

The Republic of the Sudan is composed of 18 wilayat or states, listed below. The states have their origins in the provinces during the period of Anglo-Egyptian Sudan. Before 9 July 2011, when 10 southern states gained their independence as South Sudan, the country consisted of 25 states. [1] Two additional states were created in 2012 within the Darfur region, and one in 2013 in Kordofan, bringing the total to 18.

Contents

List

The Republic of the Sudan is divided into 18 states and one area with special administrative status. Their names in Arabic are given in parenthesis.

  1. Khartoum (ولاية خرطومWilāyat Ḵarṭūm)
  2. North Kordofan (ولاية شمال كردفانWilāyat Šamāl Kurdufān)
  3. Northern (ولاية الشماليةWilāyat aš-Šamāliyya)
  4. Kassala (ولاية كسّلاWilāyat Kassalā)
  5. Blue Nile (ولاية النيل الأزرقWilāyat an-Nīl al-ʾAzraq)
  6. North Darfur (ولاية شمال دارفورWilāyat Šamāl Dārfūr)
  7. South Darfur (ولاية جنوب دارفورWilāyat Janūb Dārfūr)
  8. South Kordofan (ولاية جنوب كردفانWilāyat Janūb Kurdufān)
  9. Gezira (ولاية الجزيرةWilāyat al-Jazīra)
  10. White Nile (ولاية النيل الأبيضWilāyat an-Nīl al-ʾAbyaḍ)
  11. River Nile (ولاية نهر النيلWilāyat Nahr an-Nīl)
  12. Red Sea (ولاية البحر الأحمرWilāyat al-Baḥr al-ʾAḥmar)
  13. Al Qadarif (ولاية القضارفWilāyat al-Qaḍārif)
  14. Sennar (ولاية سنّارWilāyat Sinnār)
  15. West Darfur (ولاية غرب دارفورWilāyat Ġarb Dārfūr)
  16. Central Darfur (ولاية وسط دارفورWilāyat Wasṭ Dārfūr)
  17. East Darfur (ولاية شرق دارفورWilāyat Šarq Dārfūr)
  18. West Kordofan (ولاية غرب كردفانWilāyat Ġarb Kurdufān) (disestablished in 2005; reestablished in 2013) [2] [3]

Areas with special administrative status

As a result of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement signed in 2005, the Abyei Area was given special administrative status and following the independence of South Sudan in 2011, is considered to be simultaneously part of both the Republic of Sudan and the Republic of South Sudan, effectively a condominium.

  1. Abyei Area (منطقة أبييMinṭaqat ʾAbyī)

History

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South Sudan (held referendum in 2011, seceded in July 2011)
Abyei (to hold referendum in 2011, postponed indefinitely)
States to hold "popular consultations" in 2011: South Kordofan (process suspended) and Blue Nile (status unclear) Political Regions of Sudan, July 2006.svg
   South Sudan (held referendum in 2011, seceded in July 2011)
   Abyei (to hold referendum in 2011, postponed indefinitely)
  States to hold "popular consultations" in 2011: South Kordofan (process suspended) and Blue Nile (status unclear)

Anglo-Egyptian Sudan had eight mudiriyat , or provinces, which were ambiguous when created but became well defined by the beginning of World War II. The eight provinces were: Blue Nile, Darfur, Equatoria, Kassala, Khartoum, Kurdufan, Northern, and Upper Nile. In 1948, Bahr al Ghazal split from Equatoria. [4]

There were numerous new provinces created on 1 July 1973. North and South Darfur were created from Darfur, while Kurdufan divided into North and South Kordofan. Al Jazirah and White Nile were split off from Blue Nile. River Nile split off from Northern. Red Sea was split off from Kassala.

A further fracturing of provinces occurred in 1976. Lakes split from Bahr al Ghazal, and Jonglei split off from Upper Nile. Equatoria divided into East and Western Equatoria. There were thus eighteen provinces. In 1991, the government reorganized the administrative regions into nine federal states, matching the nine provinces that had existed from 1948 to 1973. On 14 February 1994, the government reorganized yet again, creating twenty-six wilayat (states). The majority of the wilayat were either the old provinces or administrative subregions of a province. As part of the new government structure in South Sudan in 2005, Bahr al Jabal was renamed Central Equatoria. In 2006, West Kurdufan was split and merged with North Kurdufan and South Kordofan.

In January 2012, the new states of Central Darfur and East Darfur were created in the Darfur region, bringing the total number of states to 17. [5] In July 2013, West Kurdufan was reestablished. [2] [3]

In July 2013, West Kordofan state was restored to its previous borders, as before 16 August 2005. The government announced the re-establishment of West Kordofan on 20 December 2012 (source [15]). President al-Bashir issued decrees endorsing the status of the three Kordofan states and appointing governors for them on 13 July 2013 (source [16]). West Kordofan contains Abyei district, whose status is still undetermined. A referendum is supposed to be held for Abyei to choose to stay in Sudan or join South Sudan.

Since the 2019 Sudanese coup d'état, states in Sudan have been without state governments and legislative councils.

Former states now part of South Sudan

On 9 July 2011, the ten southern states became the independent country of South Sudan. They were further divided into 86 counties.

See also

Related Research Articles

Geography of Sudan

Sudan is located in Northeast Africa. It is bordered by Egypt to the north, the Red Sea to the northeast, Eritrea and Ethiopia to the east, South Sudan to the south, the Central African Republic to the southwest, Chad to the west and Libya to the northwest. Sudan is the third largest country in Africa, after Algeria and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It had been the largest country on the continent until the 2011 independence of South Sudan.

Politics of Sudan

Currently, the politics of Sudan takes place in the framework of a Federal provisional government. Previously, a President was head of state, head of government, and commander-in-chief of the Sudanese Armed Forces in a de jure multi-party system. Legislative power was officially vested in both the government and in the two chambers, the National Assembly (lower) and the Council of States (higher), of the bicameral National Legislature. The judiciary is independent and obtained by the Constitutional Court. However, following a deadly civil war and the still ongoing genocide in Darfur, Sudan was widely recognized as a totalitarian state where all effective political power was held by President Omar al-Bashir and his National Congress Party (NCP). However, al-Bashir and the NCP were ousted in a military coup which occurred on April 11, 2019. The government of Sudan was then led by the "Transitional Military Council" or TMC. On 20 August 2019, the TMC dissolved giving its authority over to the Sovereignty Council of Sudan, who are planned to govern for 39 months until 2022, in the process of transitioning to democracy.

Khartoum (state) State of Sudan

Khartoum State is one of the eighteen states of Sudan. Although it is the smallest state by area (22,142 km2), it is the most populous. It contains the country's second largest city by population, Omdurman, and the city of Khartoum, which is the capital of the state as well as the national capital of Sudan. The capital city contains offices of the state, governmental and non-governmental organizations, cultural institutions, and the main airport.

West Darfur State of Sudan

West Darfur State is one of the states of Sudan, and one of five comprising the Darfur region. Prior to the creation of two new states in January 2012, it had an area of 79,460 km² and an estimated population of approximately 1,007,000 (2006). It borders North and Central Darfur to the east. The Chadian prefectures of Biltine and Ouaddaï lie to the west, while to the north is the prefecture of Bourkou-Ennedi-Tibesti. Al-Junaynah is the capital of the state. West Darfur has been the site of much of the ongoing Darfur conflict.

West Kordofan State of Sudan

West Kordofan is one of the 18 wilayat or provinces of Sudan. In 2006 it had an area of 111,373 km² and an estimated population of approximately 1,320,405. Al-Fulah is the capital of the state.

South Darfur State of Sudan

South Darfur State is one of the wilayat or states of Sudan. It is one of the five states that compose the region of Darfur in western Sudan.

South Kordofan State of Sudan

South Kordofan is one of the 18 wilayat or provinces of Sudan. It has an area of 158,355 km² and an estimated population of approximately 1,100,000 people (2000). Kaduqli is the capital of the state. It is centered on the Nuba Hills. At one time it was supposed that South Kordofan was the only state in (North) Sudan suitable for producing oil, but oil has also been discovered in neighboring White Nile State in larger quantities.

North Darfur State of Sudan

North Darfur State is one of the wilayat or states of Sudan. It is one of the five states composing the Darfur region. It has an area of 296,420 km2 and an estimated population of approximately 1,583,000 (2006). Al-Fashir is the capital of the state. Other significant towns include Ailliet, Kebkabiya, Kutum, Mellit (Malit), Tawilah and Umm Keddada.

North Kordofan State of Sudan

North Kordofan is one of the 18 wilayat or states of Sudan. It has an area of 185,302 km2 and an estimated population of 2,920,890. El-Obeid is the capital of the state.

Bahr el Ghazal (region of South Sudan) Region in South Sudan

The Bahr el Ghazal is a region of northwestern South Sudan. Its name came from the river Bahr el Ghazal. The name translates as "sea of gazelles" from Arabic.

Kordofan former province of Sudan

Kordofan is a former province of central Sudan. In 1994 it was divided into three new federal states: North Kordofan, South Kordofan and West Kordofan. In August 2005, West Kordofan State was abolished and its territory divided between North and South Kordofan States, as part of the implementation of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement between the Government of Sudan and the Sudan People's Liberation Movement. West Kordofan was reestablished in July 2013.

United Nations Mission in Sudan

The United Nations Mission in the Sudan (UNMIS) was established by the UN Security Council under Resolution 1590 of 24 March 2005, in response to the signing of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement between the government of the Sudan and the Sudan People's Liberation Movement on January 9, 2005 in Sudan.

Emblem of Sudan

The current national emblem of Sudan was adopted in 1985.

Messiria tribe

The Messiria, known also under the name of Misseriya Arabs, are a branch of the Baggara ethnic grouping of Arab tribes. Their language is the Sudanese Arabic. Numbering over one million, the Baggara are the second largest ethnic group in Western Sudan, extending into Eastern Chad. They are primarily nomadic cattle herders and their journeys are dependent upon the seasons of the year. The use of the term Baggara carries negative connotations as slave raiders, so they prefer to be called instead Messiria.

History of Darfur

Throughout its history, Darfur has been the home to several cultures and kingdoms, like the mythical Tora or the Daju and Tunjur kingdoms. The recorded history of Darfur begins in the seventeenth century, with the foundation of the Fur Sultanate by the Keira dynasty. In 1875, the Anglo-Egyptian Co-dominion in Khartoum ended the dynasty. The British allowed Darfur a measure of autonomy until formal annexation in 1916. However, the region remained underdeveloped through the period of colonial rule and after independence in 1956. The majority of national resources were directed toward the riverine Arabs clustered along the Nile near Khartoum. This pattern of structural inequality and overly underdevelopment resulted in increasing restiveness among Darfuris. The influence of regional geopolitics and war by proxy, coupled with economic hardship and environmental degradation, from soon after independence led to sporadic armed resistance from the mid-1980s. The continued violence culminated in an armed resistance movement around 2003.

Outline of Sudan Overview of and topical guide to Sudan

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to Sudan:

States of South Sudan

The States of South Sudan were created out of the three historic former provinces of Bahr el Ghazal (northwest), Equatoria (southern), and Greater Upper Nile (northeast). The states are further divided into 180 counties.

Southern Sudan Autonomous Region (2005–2011) Autonomous region consisting of the ten southern states of Sudan between its formation in July 2005 and independence as the Republic of South Sudan in July 2011

Southern Sudan was an autonomous region consisting of the ten southern states of Sudan between its formation in July 2005 and independence as the Republic of South Sudan in July 2011. The autonomous government was initially established in Rumbek and later moved to Juba. It was bordered by Ethiopia to the east; Kenya, Uganda, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo to the south; and the Central African Republic to the west. To the north lies the predominantly Arab and Muslim region directly under the control of the central government. The region's autonomous status was a condition of a peace agreement between the Sudan People's Liberation Army/Movement (SPLA/M) and the Government of Sudan represented by the National Congress Party ending the Second Sudanese Civil War. The conflict was Africa's longest running civil war.

Sudanese conflict in South Kordofan and Blue Nile

The Sudanese conflict in South Kordofan and Blue Nile is an armed conflict in the Sudanese southern states of South Kordofan and Blue Nile between the Sudanese Army (SAF) and Sudan People's Liberation Movement-North (SPLM-N), a northern affiliate of the Sudan People's Liberation Movement (SPLM) in South Sudan. After some years of relative calm following the 2005 agreement which ended the second Sudanese civil war between the Sudanese government and SPLM rebels, fighting broke out again in the lead-up to South Sudan independence on 9 July 2011, starting in South Kordofan on 5 June and spreading to the neighboring Blue Nile state in September. SPLM-N, splitting from newly independent SPLM, took up arms against the inclusion of the two southern states in Sudan with no popular consultation and against the lack of democratic elections. The conflict is intertwined with the War in Darfur, since in November 2011 SPLM-N established a loose alliance with Darfuri rebels, called Sudan Revolutionary Front (SRF).

Central Darfur State of Sudan

Central Darfur State is one of the states of Sudan, and one of five comprising the Darfur region. It was created in January 2012 as a result of the ongoing peace process for the wider Darfur region. The state capital is Zalingei. The state was formed from land that had been part of the states of West Darfur and South Darfur.

References

  1. "States history".
  2. 1 2 "Western Kordofan State". Archived from the original on August 12, 2013.
  3. 1 2 "Sudan shuffles governors of Kordofan states including ICC suspect - Sudan Tribune: Plural news and views on Sudan". www.sudantribune.com.
  4. "States of Sudan".
  5. "allAfrica.com: Sudan: President Bashir Appoints New State Governors". web.archive.org. January 15, 2012.