Provinces of Burundi

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Burundi is divided into eighteen provinces, each named after their respective capital with the exception of Bujumbura Rural. The newest province, Rumonge, was created on 26 March 2015 from five communes previously belonging to the provinces of Bujumbura Rural and Bururi. [1]

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Bururi Province Province of Burundi

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The Anglican dioceses of Burundi are the Anglican presence in Burundi; together they form the Province of the Anglican Church of Burundi. The Anglican churches of the area were under the authority of the Archbishop of Canterbury until 1965, when the Province of Uganda and Ruanda-Urundi was created; Burundi was then part of the Province of Rwanda, Burundi, and Boga-Zaire from 1980 until its own church province was erected in 1992.

References

  1. Nkurunziza, Pierre (26 March 2015). "LOI No 1/10 DU 26 MARS 2015 PORTANT CREATION DE LA PROVINCE DU RUMONGE ET DELIMITATION DES PROVINCES DE BUJUMBURA, BURURI ET RUMONGE" (PDF). Presidential Cabinet, Republic of Burundi. Retrieved 14 July 2015.
  2. "Burundi: administrative units, extended". GeoHive. Archived from the original on 14 July 2015. Retrieved 13 July 2015.
  3. Law, Gwillim. "Provinces of Burundi". Statoids. Retrieved 13 July 2015.