Three Lakes Patrol Cabin

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Three Lakes Patrol Cabin
Three Lakes Patrol Cabin. (75f9b7a5d9cd44c68a154f13e8c35bcb).JPG
USA Washington location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Nearest city Ohanapecosh, Washington
Coordinates 46°45′51″N121°28′21″W / 46.76417°N 121.47250°W / 46.76417; -121.47250 Coordinates: 46°45′51″N121°28′21″W / 46.76417°N 121.47250°W / 46.76417; -121.47250
Arealess than one acre
Built1934
Architectural styleRustic style
MPS Mt. Rainier National Park MPS
NRHP reference No. 91000189 [1]
Added to NRHPMarch 13, 1991

The Three Lakes Patrol Cabin was built in 1934 in Mount Rainier National Park as a district ranger station. The log cabin was built to a standard plan designed by W.G. Carnes, Acting Chief Architect of the National Park Service Branch of Plans and Designs, supervised by Thomas Chalmers Vint. The cabin measures about 13.5 feet (4.1 m) by 24 feet (7.3 m). It is a simple gable structure with a shed roof over the front door, supported by brackets. The eaves have a similar bracket detail. Log ends project prominently at the corners. It consists of a single room, unfinished apart from a wood floor. [2]

The cabin was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on March 13, 1991. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. March 13, 2009.
  2. Harvey, David (September 28, 1982). "Pacific Northwest Regional Office Inventory: Three Lakes Patrol Cabin". National Park Service.Missing or empty |url= (help)