Thripophaga

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Thripophaga
Thripophaga macroura - Striated Softail; Sooretama, Espirito Santo, Brazil.jpg
Thripophaga macroura
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Furnariidae
Genus: Thripophaga
Cabanis, 1847
Species

See text

Thripophaga is the genus of birds that popularly are known as softtails. They are members of the ovenbird family, Furnariidae. They are found in wooded and shrubby habitats, sometimes near water, in South America.

Contents

Taxonomy and systematics

Softtails are closely related to Cranioleuca spinetails and the generic limits between these two genera were not clear in the past. [1] For example, the Russet-mantled Softtail, despite its English name, is a true Cranioleuca spinetail, and the speckled spinetail turned out to be part of Thripophaga. [1] Previous speculations suggesting a close relationship between Thripophaga and Phacellodomus were disproved.

Extant species

The genus contains five species:

Related Research Articles

Ovenbird (family)

Ovenbirds or furnariids are a large family of small suboscine passerine birds found from Mexico and Central to southern South America. They form the family Furnariidae. The ovenbird, which breeds in North America, is not a furnariid – rather it is a distantly related bird of the wood warbler family, Parulidae.

Woodcreeper

The woodcreepers (Dendrocolaptinae) comprise a subfamily of suboscine passerine birds endemic to the Neotropics. They have traditionally been considered a distinct family Dendrocolaptidae, but most authorities now place them as a subfamily of the ovenbirds (Furnariidae). They superficially resemble the Old World treecreepers, but they are unrelated and the similarities are due to convergent evolution. The subfamily contains around 57 species in 15 to 20 genera.

<i>Synallaxis</i>

Synallaxis is a genus of birds in the ovenbird family, Furnariidae.

Canastero

Canasteros and thistletails are small passerine birds of South America belonging to the genus Asthenes. The name "canastero" comes from Spanish and means "basket-maker", referring to the large, domed nests these species make of sticks or grass. They feed on insects and other invertebrates.

<i>Automolus</i>

Automolus is a genus of bird in the family Furnariidae.

Tepui foliage-gleaner

The tepui foliage-gleaner, also known as the white-throated foliage-gleaner, is a species of bird in the family Furnariidae. It is found in forest and woodland in the tepuis of Brazil, Guyana and Venezuela.

<i>Cranioleuca</i>

The typical spinetails, Cranioleuca, are a genus of Neotropical birds in the ovenbird family Furnariidae.

Line-cheeked spinetail

The line-cheeked spinetail is an arboreal species of bird in the ovenbird family Furnariidae. It is a common species in the Andes in Ecuador and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, woodland and scrub. It is distinguished from other species by its distribution, behaviour and white supercilium. There are two recognized subspecies, which are in reality a gradient in morphology and plumage from one extreme to the other.

Sulphur-bearded reedhaunter

The sulphur-bearded reedhaunter is a species of non-migratory bird in the family Furnariidae. It is found in the Pampas and adjacent areas of eastern Argentina and Rio Grande do Sul. Its natural habitat is swamps.

Rusty-backed spinetail

The rusty-backed spinetail is a Neotropical species of bird in the Furnariidae (ovenbird) family. The taxon from Panama is considered a separate species, the Coiba spinetail.

Red-shouldered spinetail Species of bird

The red-shouldered spinetail is a species of bird in the ovenbird family Furnariidae. It is endemic to the Caatinga region of north-eastern Brazil. It is threatened by habitat loss.

Eastern woodhaunter

The eastern woodhaunter, also known as the Amazonian woodhaunter, is a species of bird in the family Furnariidae. It was formerly treated as conspecific with the western woodhaunter and when lumped had the name "striped woodhaunter". It is found in the western part of the Amazon rainforest: west Brazil, southeast Colombia, east Ecuador, northeast Peru, south Venezuela and north Bolivia. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.

Tawny tit-spinetail

The tawny tit-spinetail is a species of bird in the family Furnariidae. It is found in Peru, Bolivia and far northwestern Argentina.

Curve-billed reedhaunter

The curve-billed reedhaunter is a species of bird in the family Furnariidae. It is found in marshy areas of north-eastern Argentina, south-eastern Brazil, and Uruguay. It occupies a similar ecological niche to some reed warblers.

<i>Phacellodomus</i>

Phacellodomus is the genus of thornbirds, birds in the family Furnariidae. They are found in woodland, shrubland and grassland, often near water, in South America.

Buff-fronted foliage-gleaner

The buff-fronted foliage-gleaner is a species of bird in the family Furnariidae, the ovenbirds. It is found in southeastern regions of South America in the cerrado and pantanal of Brazil and Paraguay as well as areas of southeast coastal Brazil; also extreme northeast Argentina. In western Andean and northwest South America, it is found in Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia; and in the northwest, it is also found in Panama and Costa Rica.

Great spinetail

The great spinetail is a species of bird in the family Furnariidae. It is endemic to Peru where its natural habitat is Mediterranean-type shrubby vegetation. It is threatened by habitat loss.

White-bellied spinetail

The white-bellied spinetail is a species of bird in the family Furnariidae. It is found in river islands of the western Amazon Basin. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist shrubland.

Russet-mantled softtail

The russet-mantled softtail is a species of bird in the family Furnariidae. It is endemic to Peru.

Poecilurus is an obsolete genus of birds formerly classified in the Furnariidae (ovenbird) family from South America. It contained three species:

References

  1. 1 2 Derryberry, Elizabeth P.; Claramunt, Santiago; Derryberry, Graham; Chesser, R. Terry; Cracraft, Joel; Aleixo, Alexandre; Pérez-Emán, Jorge; Remsen Jr., J. V.; Brumfield, Robb T. (2011). "Lineage diversification and morphological evolution in a large-scale continental radiation: the Neotropical ovenbirds and woodcreepers (Aves: Furnariidae)". Evolution. 65 (10): 2973–2986. doi: 10.1111/j.1558-5646.2011.01374.x . ISSN   0014-3820. PMID   21967436.