Transport in Honduras

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A highway in Honduras. Carretera37.jpg
A highway in Honduras.
Toncontin International Airport, Tegucigalpa. ToncontinTerminal.jpg
Toncontín International Airport, Tegucigalpa.
Passenger train in La Ceiba on January 11, 2005. Engineer tanks fuel manually from a barrel. Colorful passenger car (former box car without walls) is attached to the right. Train LaCeiba2.JPG
Passenger train in La Ceiba on January 11, 2005. Engineer tanks fuel manually from a barrel. Colorful passenger car (former box car without walls) is attached to the right.

Transport in Honduras refers to transport in Honduras, a country in Central America.

Transport human-directed movement of things or people between locations

Transport or transportation is the movement of humans, animals and goods from one location to another. In other words the action of transport is defined as a particular movement of an organism or thing from a point A to the Point B. Modes of transport include air, land, water, cable, pipeline and space. The field can be divided into infrastructure, vehicles and operations. Transport is important because it enables trade between people, which is essential for the development of civilizations.

Honduras republic in Central America

Honduras, officially the Republic of Honduras, is a country in Central America. In the past, it was sometimes referred to as "Spanish Honduras" to differentiate it from British Honduras, which later became modern-day Belize. The republic of Honduras is bordered to the west by Guatemala, to the southwest by El Salvador, to the southeast by Nicaragua, to the south by the Pacific Ocean at the Gulf of Fonseca, and to the north by the Gulf of Honduras, a large inlet of the Caribbean Sea.

Central America central geographic region of the Americas

Central America is located on the southern tip of North America, or is sometimes defined as a subcontinent of the Americas, bordered by Mexico to the north, Colombia to the southeast, the Caribbean Sea to the east, and the Pacific Ocean to the west and south. Central America consists of seven countries: Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama. The combined population of Central America has been estimated to be 41,739,000 and 42,688,190.

Contents

Railways

Total: 699 km
narrow gauge: 349 km
3 ft 6 in (1,067 mm) gauge: 246 km
3 ft (914 mm) gauge

(North to South)

Transport in El Salvador

El Salvador has transport links by road, rail, sea and air.

Transport in Guatemala

Transportation in Guatemala includes roads, waterways, and airports. It formerly included railways.

Transport in Nicaragua revolves around road, air and water transport modalities.

Highways

paved: 3,367 km
unpaved: 11357 km (2012 est.)

Double carriageway highways are slowly being developed in the main population areas in Honduras, however they are not traffic-selective and accept any kind of traffic, thus slowing the speed along them. The current ones are:

San Pedro Sula Place in Cortés, Honduras

San Pedro Sula is the capital of Cortés Department, Honduras. It is located in the northwest corner of the country in the Sula Valley, about 50 kilometres (31 mi) south of Puerto Cortés on the Caribbean Sea. With a census population of 719,063 in 2013, and 1,445,598 people living in its metropolitan area in 2010, it is the nation's primary industrial center and second largest city after the capital Tegucigalpa.

Puerto Cortés town in Cortés, Honduras

Puerto Cortés, originally known as Puerto de Caballos, is a city on the north Caribbean coast of Honduras, right on the Laguna de Alvarado, north of San Pedro Sula and east of Omoa, with a natural bay. The present city was founded in the early colonial period. It grew rapidly in the twentieth century, thanks to the then railroad, and banana production. In terms of volume of traffic the seaport is the largest in Central America and the 36th largest in the world. As of 2014, Puerto Cortés has a population of some 200,000.

El Progreso Municipality in Yoro, Honduras

The municipality of El Progreso is located in the Honduran department of Yoro.

Waterways

465 km navigable by small craft, mainly along the Northern coast.

Ports and harbors

Atlantic Ocean

Tela Place in Atlántida, Honduras

Tela is a town in Honduras on the northern Caribbean coast. It is located in the department of Atlantida.

La Ceiba Place in Atlántida, Honduras

La Ceiba is a port city on the northern coast of Honduras in Central America. It is located on the southern edge of the Caribbean, forming part of the south eastern boundary of the Gulf of Honduras. With an estimated population of over 200,000 living in approximately 170 residential areas, it is the third largest city in the country and the capital of the Honduran department of Atlántida. La Ceiba was officially founded on 23 August 1877. The city was named after a giant ceiba tree which grew near the old dock. The dock itself finally fell into the sea in late 2007. The city has been officially proclaimed the "Eco-Tourism Capital of Honduras" as well as the "Entertainment Capital of Honduras". Every year, on the third or fourth Saturday of May, the city holds its famous carnival to commemorate Isidore the Laborer. During this time, the city is host to approximately 500,000 tourists.

Puerto Castilla, Honduras

Puerto Castilla is a village in the Colón Department of Honduras located approximately 20 kilometres (12 mi) north of Trujillo. This port city on the Caribbean Sea was the one-time site of the United Fruit Company's Castilla Division which specialized in the growth, cultivation and shipments of the Gros Michel banana. This division was closed in the late 1930s as a result of 'Panama disease', a blight on the roots of the banana.

Pacific Ocean

Other

Merchant marine

total: 306 ships (1,000 GT or over) totaling 848,150 GT/980,995 tonnes deadweight (DWT)
ships by type: (1999 est.)
Bulk carrier merchant ship specially designed to transport unpackaged bulk cargo

A bulk carrier,bulk freighter, or colloquially, bulker is a merchant ship specially designed to transport unpackaged bulk cargo, such as grains, coal, ore, and cement, in its cargo holds. Since the first specialized bulk carrier was built in 1852, economic forces have led to continued development of these ships, resulting in increased size and sophistication. Today's bulk carriers are specially designed to maximize capacity, safety, efficiency, and durability.

Cargo ship ship or vessel that carries cargo, goods, and materials onboard from one port to another

A cargo ship or freighter ship is a merchant ship that carries cargo, goods, and materials from one port to another. Thousands of cargo carriers ply the world's seas and oceans each year, handling the bulk of international trade. Cargo ships are usually specially designed for the task, often being equipped with cranes and other mechanisms to load and unload, and come in all sizes. Today, they are almost always built by welded steel, and with some exceptions generally have a life expectancy of 25 to 30 years before being scrapped.

Chemical tanker type of tanker ship designed to transport chemicals in bulk

A chemical tanker is a type of tanker ship designed to transport chemicals in bulk. As defined in MARPOL Annex II, chemical tanker means a ship constructed or adapted for carrying in bulk any liquid product listed in chapter 17 of the International Bulk Chemical Code. As well as industrial chemicals and clean petroleum products, such ships also often carry other types of sensitive cargo which require a high standard of tank cleaning, such as palm oil, vegetable oils, tallow, caustic soda, and methanol.

Passenger ship Watercraft intended to carry people onboard

A passenger ship is a merchant ship whose primary function is to carry passengers on the sea. The category does not include cargo vessels which have accommodations for limited numbers of passengers, such as the ubiquitous twelve-passenger freighters once common on the seas in which the transport of passengers is secondary to the carriage of freight. The type does however include many classes of ships designed to transport substantial numbers of passengers as well as freight. Indeed, until recently virtually all ocean liners were able to transport mail, package freight and express, and other cargo in addition to passenger luggage, and were equipped with cargo holds and derricks, kingposts, or other cargo-handling gear for that purpose. Only in more recent ocean liners and in virtually all cruise ships has this cargo capacity been eliminated.

Roll-on/roll-off vessels designed to carry wheeled cargo that are driven on and off the ship on their own wheels

Roll-on/roll-off ships are vessels designed to carry wheeled cargo, such as cars, trucks, semi-trailer trucks, trailers, and railroad cars, that are driven on and off the ship on their own wheels or using a platform vehicle, such as a self-propelled modular transporter. This is in contrast to lift-on/lift-off (LoLo) vessels, which use a crane to load and unload cargo.

Coastal trading vessel shallow-hulled ships used for trade between locations on the same island or continent

Coastal trading vessels, also known as coasters, are shallow-hulled ships used for trade between locations on the same island or continent. Their shallow hulls mean that they can get through reefs where deeper-hulled seagoing ships usually cannot.

note:

a flag of convenience registry; (1998 est.)

Airports

119 (1999 est.)

See also: List of airports in Honduras
Main international airports: San Pedro Sula and Tegucigalpa.
Other international airports: Roatan and La Ceiba

Airports - with paved runways

total: 12
2,438 to 3,047 m: 3
1,524 to 2,437 m: 2
914 to 1,523 m: 4
under 914 m: 3 (1999 est.)

Airports - with unpaved runways

total: 107
1,524 to 2,437 m: 2
914 to 1,523 m: 21
under 914 m: 84 (1999 est.)

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Rail transport in Honduras

Railroads in Honduras were built in late 19th and early 20th centuries by two competing U.S. corporations - United Fruit and Standard Fruit. All were in the Caribbean coastal area and never reached the capital. In 1993, the combined network had 785 km. At present (2006), only three separate segments remain in operation under the management of FNH - Ferrocarril Nacional de Honduras:

The 1972–73 Honduran Liga Nacional season was expected to be the 8th edition of the Honduran Liga Nacional. However, on 12 August 1972, due to economic problems the tournament was cancelled after nine weeks completed. It's unclear how Club Deportivo Olimpia and C.D.S. Vida obtained berths to the 1973 CONCACAF Champions' Cup.

Rail transport in Central America

Rail transport in Central America consists of several isolated railroad lines with freight or passenger service. The most famous one is the Panama Canal Railway, the oldest transcontinental railroad in the world, connecting Panama City with Colón since 1855. Other railroads in Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama were built by private and public investors mainly to facilitate the transport of local agricultural produce to export markets and harbors. Their market share and profitability went into decline in the second half of the twentieth century and most lines have been decommissioned by the end of the 1990s. As of 2018, railroads operate locally in Honduras, Costa Rica and Panama only; all rail transport has been suspended in Belize, El Salvador, Guatemala and Nicaragua. None of the operating railways crosses national borders.

The 1976–77 Honduran Liga Nacional season was the 11th edition of the Honduran Liga Nacional. The format of the tournament remained the same as the previous season. C.D. España won the title after defeating C.D. Motagua in the finals. Both teams qualified to the 1977 CONCACAF Champions' Cup.

The 1970–71 Honduran Liga Nacional season was the 6th edition of the Honduran Liga Nacional. The format of the tournament remained the same as the previous season. C.D. Motagua won the title and qualified to the 1971 CONCACAF Champions' Cup along with runners-up Club Deportivo Olimpia.

The 1995–96 Honduran Liga Nacional season was the 30th edition of the Honduran Liga Nacional. The format of the tournament remained the same as the previous season. Club Deportivo Olimpia won the title after defeating Real C.D. España in the finals. Both teams qualified to the 1997 CONCACAF Champions' Cup.

The 1969–70 Honduran Liga Nacional season was the 5th edition of the Honduran Liga Nacional. The format of the tournament remained the same as the previous season. Club Deportivo Olimpia won the title and qualified to the 1970 CONCACAF Champions' Cup.

The 1983–84 Honduran Liga Nacional season was the 18th edition of the Honduran Liga Nacional. The format of the tournament consisted of a four round-robin schedule. C.D.S. Vida won the title and qualified to the 1984 CONCACAF Champions' Cup along with runners-up Universidad.

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Universidad Tecnológica de Honduras known by its acronym UTH, is a private university located in Honduras. It is known for its careers in Business Management, Law, Marketing and Tourism, and several engineering careers such as Industrial Production engineering, Computer Engineering and Electronics.

Lanhsa Airlines

Lanhsa, is an airline in Honduras operating scheduled and charter service.

The network of highways in Honduras is managed by the Secretariat of public works, transport and housing (SOPTRAVI), through the General Directorate of Roads, which is responsible for planning construction and maintenance work on the country's roads. Honduras has more than 15,400 kilometres (9,600 mi) of roads. Up to 1999, only 3,126 kilometres (1,942 mi) had been paved.

References

  1. "Shaw Group in talks with US railroad cos for Feristsa project, Central America, Infrastructure, news" . Retrieved 2010-10-16.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the CIA World Factbook website https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/index.html .