Battle of Verdun (1792)

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Battle of Verdun (1792)
Part of the French Revolutionary Wars
Capitulation de Verdun 1792.jpg
The body of Colonel Beaurepaire leaving Verdun after the battle
Date29 August – 2 September 1792
Location Verdun, France
Result Prussian victory
Belligerents
Flag of France (1790-1794).svg  Kingdom of France Flag of the Kingdom of Prussia (1750-1801).svg  Kingdom of Prussia
Commanders and leaders
Colonel Beaurepaire   Charles II, Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel
Strength
3,500–4,000 60,000, 40 guns
Casualties and losses
2,500 8,000

The first Battle of Verdun was fought on 29 August 1792 between French Revolutionary forces and a Prussian army during the opening months of the War of the First Coalition. The Prussians were victorious, gaining a clear westward path to Paris. [1]

French Revolution social and political revolution in France and its colonies occurring from 1789 to 1798

The French Revolution was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France and its colonies beginning in 1789. The Revolution overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, catalyzed violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon who brought many of its principles to areas he conquered in Western Europe and beyond. Inspired by liberal and radical ideas, the Revolution profoundly altered the course of modern history, triggering the global decline of absolute monarchies while replacing them with republics and liberal democracies. Through the Revolutionary Wars, it unleashed a wave of global conflicts that extended from the Caribbean to the Middle East. Historians widely regard the Revolution as one of the most important events in human history.

Kingdom of Prussia Former German state (1701–1918)

The Kingdom of Prussia was a German kingdom that constituted the state of Prussia between 1701 and 1918. It was the driving force behind the unification of Germany in 1871 and was the leading state of the German Empire until its dissolution in 1918. Although it took its name from the region called Prussia, it was based in the Margraviate of Brandenburg, where its capital was Berlin.

See also

Franco-Prussian War significant conflict pitting the Second French Empire against the Kingdom of Prussia and its allies

The Franco-Prussian War or Franco-German War, often referred to in France as the War of 1870, was a conflict between the Second French Empire and later the Third French Republic, and the German states of the North German Confederation led by the Kingdom of Prussia. Lasting from 19 July 1870 to 28 January 1871, the conflict was caused by Prussian ambitions to extend German unification and French fears of the shift in the European balance of power that would result if the Prussians succeeded. Some historians argue that the Prussian chancellor Otto von Bismarck deliberately provoked the French into declaring war on Prussia in order to draw the independent southern German states—Baden, Württemberg, Bavaria and Hesse-Darmstadt—into an alliance with the North German Confederation dominated by Prussia, while others contend that Bismarck did not plan anything and merely exploited the circumstances as they unfolded. None, however, dispute the fact that Bismarck must have recognized the potential for new German alliances, given the situation as a whole.

Battle of Verdun battle on the Western Front during the First World War

The Battle of Verdun, fought from 21 February to 18 December 1916, was the largest and longest battle of the First World War on the Western Front between the German and French armies. The battle took place on the hills north of Verdun-sur-Meuse in north-eastern France. The German 5th Army attacked the defences of the Fortified Region of Verdun and those of the French Second Army on the right bank of the Meuse. Inspired by the experience of the Second Battle of Champagne in 1915, the Germans planned to capture the Meuse Heights, an excellent defensive position with good observation for artillery-fire on Verdun. The Germans hoped that the French would commit their strategic reserve to recapture the position and suffer catastrophic losses in a battle of annihilation, at little cost to the Germans in tactically advantageous positions on the heights.

World War I 1914–1918 global war originating in Europe

World War I, also known as the First World War or the Great War, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918. Contemporaneously described as "the war to end all wars", it led to the mobilisation of more than 70 million military personnel, including 60 million Europeans, making it one of the largest wars in history. It is also one of the deadliest conflicts in history, with an estimated nine million combatants and seven million civilian deaths as a direct result of the war, while resulting genocides and the 1918 influenza pandemic caused another 50 to 100 million deaths worldwide.

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Fort Douaumont fort protecting the city of Verdun, France

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The 4th Division was a unit of the Prussian/German Army. It was formed in Torgau on September 5, 1818. The headquarters moved to Stargard in 1820, where it stayed until 1852. In 1852, the headquarters moved to its final destination, Bromberg. From the corps' formation in 1820, the division was subordinated in peacetime to the II Army Corps. The 4th Division was disbanded in 1919 during the demobilization of the German Army after World War I.

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5th Army (German Empire) army level command of the German Army in World War I

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Le Mort Homme

The heights of Le Mort Homme or Dead Man's Hill lie within the French municipality of Cumières-le-Mort-Homme around 10 kilometres northwest of the town of Verdun in France. The hill earned tragic notoriety for being the scene of bitter fighting in the Battle of Verdun during the First World War.

References

  1. Parker, Geoffrey (2008). The Cambridge Illustrated History of Warfare. New York: Cambridge University Press. p. 195. ISBN   978-0-521-73806-4 . Retrieved 22 January 2012.

Coordinates: 49°09′39″N5°23′18″E / 49.1608°N 5.3884°E / 49.1608; 5.3884

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.