Indianism (arts)

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Moema, by Brazilian Romantic painter Victor Meirelles Vitor meirelles - moema02.jpg
Moema, by Brazilian Romantic painter Victor Meirelles
Iracema, by Antonio Parreiras. Based on Jose de Alencar's homonymous novel Iracema (Antonio Parreiras, 1909).jpg
Iracema, by Antônio Parreiras. Based on José de Alencar's homonymous novel

Indianism (in Portuguese : Indianismo) is a Brazilian literary and artistic movement that reached its peak during the first stages of Romanticism, though it had been present in Brazilian literature since the Baroque period.

Contents

In Romantic contexts, it is called "the first generation of Brazilian Romanticism", being succeeded by the "Ultra-Romanticism" and the "Condorism".

Historical context

After the independence of Brazil from Portugal in 1822, a heavy wave of nationalism spread through the Brazilian people. Inspired by this, poets and writers began to search for an entity that could represent and personify the newly created Brazilian nation.

The Last Tamoio, by Rodolfo Amoedo Ultimo tamoio 1883.jpg
The Last Tamoio, by Rodolfo Amoedo

Since there was no Middle Ages in Brazil, it could not be the knight, as in the European chivalric romances; it could not be the Portuguese man either, since Brazilians still held resentment for the years of colonization; it could not be the black man either, since the mentality of the time did not allow it. Influenced by Enlightenment ideals, especially works by Jean-Jacques Rousseau and the "noble savage" myth, the authors chose the Brazilian Indian to represent the new nation.

Characteristics

Indianist works are characterized by always having an Indian as the protagonist. The poetry is very patriotic and nationalistic, exalting Brazilian fauna, flora, riches and people.

Major proponents

Goncalves Dias, the most famous Indianist poet Goncalves Dias.jpg
Gonçalves Dias, the most famous Indianist poet

Literature

Baroque

Neoclassicism

Romanticism

Arts

See also

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