New Albany, Mississippi

Last updated
New Albany, Mississippi
NewAlbanyMississippiWelcomeSign.jpg
Nickname(s): 
"The Fair and Friendly City"
Union County Mississippi Incorporated and Unincorporated areas New Albany Highlighted.svg
Location of New Albany, Mississippi
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New Albany, Mississippi
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 34°29′32″N89°0′34″W / 34.49222°N 89.00944°W / 34.49222; -89.00944 Coordinates: 34°29′32″N89°0′34″W / 34.49222°N 89.00944°W / 34.49222; -89.00944
Country United States
State Mississippi
County Union
Government
  MayorGage Lashlee
Area
[1]
  Total18.28 sq mi (47.35 km2)
  Land18.23 sq mi (47.22 km2)
  Water0.05 sq mi (0.13 km2)
Elevation
361 ft (110 m)
Population
 (2020)
  Total7,626
  Density418.25/sq mi (161.49/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (Central (CST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
38652
Area code 662
FIPS code 28-51000
GNIS feature ID0694153
Website City website

New Albany is a city in Union County, Mississippi. The population was 8,034 at the time of the 2010 census. New Albany is the county seat of Union County. [2]

Contents

History

New Albany was first organized in 1840 at the site of a grist mill and saw mill on the Tallahatchie River and was developed as a river port. New Albany is the birthplace of author William Faulkner as well as Eli Whiteside and Bettie Wilson and the adopted home of Morris Futorian, father of the Northeast Mississippi furniture industry. As of 2010 New Albany has a population of 8,526 and is known for its education system, well-educated labor force and strong work ethic. The city houses modern factories, robust neighborhoods and vibrant shopping centers, while at the same time preserving its historic downtown area.

Organized in 1840 at the site of a grist mill and a saw mill on the Tallahatchie River near the intersection of two historic Chickasaw Indian trade trails, the town developed as a river port and as a regional center for agriculture and commerce. The Civil War interrupted this progress, however, as Union troops swept through the city and burned all but a few buildings.

Union County was formed from parts of neighboring Lee, Pontotoc, and Tippah Counties in 1870, with New Albany designated as county seat. The city's new role as a center of government led to renewed economic activity. Citizens’ efforts in the late 1880s to secure a railroad through New Albany were rewarded with two railroads connecting the community to points north, south, east and west. A depot clerk for one of the railroads was the father of William Faulkner. Born in 1897 in a single-story clapboard house, Faulkner went on to write 19 novels and 75 short stories, winning the Nobel Prize and two Pulitzer Prizes for his work.

In 1925 L. Q. Ivy, a 17 year old African American boy, was accused of assaulting a white woman at Rocky Ford, Mississippi. Sheriff John Roberts transported him to New Albany, then to neighboring Lee County to avoid a lynch mob. However, by the next day, a group of Union County residents secured a writ to have Ivy returned to Union County. Upon learning of his arrival, a mob formed, kidnapped Ivy, and tortured him before burning him alive at Rocky Ford, Mississippi (present day Etta). [3] [4]

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 17.1 square miles (44 km2), of which 17.0 square miles (44 km2) is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) (0.35%) is water.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1880 250
1890 548119.2%
1900 1,03388.5%
1910 2,03296.7%
1920 2,53124.6%
1930 3,18725.9%
1940 3,60213.0%
1950 3,6802.2%
1960 5,15140.0%
1970 6,42624.8%
1980 7,07210.1%
1990 6,775−4.2%
2000 7,60712.3%
2010 8,0345.6%
2020 7,626−5.1%
U.S. Decennial Census [5]

2020 census

New Albany Racial Composition [6]
RaceNum.Perc.
White 4,31956.64%
Black or African American 2,22929.23%
Native American 110.14%
Asian 690.9%
Other/Mixed 2763.62%
Hispanic or Latino 7229.47%

As of the 2020 United States Census, there were 7,626 people, 2,971 households, and 1,911 families residing in the city.

2010 census

As of the census [7] of 2010, there were 8,526 people, 3,049 households, and 3,027 families residing in the city. The population density was 476.1 people per square mile (172.3/km2). There were 3,329 housing units at an average density of 195.2 per square mile (75.4/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 63.98% White, 32.98% African American, 0.17% Native American, 0.35% Asian, 1.54% from other races, and 0.97% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.83% of the population.

There were 3,049 households, out of which 31.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.0% were married couples living together, 17.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.5% were non-families. 30.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 14.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 26.3% under the age of 18, 8.8% from 18 to 24, 27.1% from 25 to 44, 20.5% from 45 to 64, and 17.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 86.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 78.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $28,730, and the median income for a family was $38,750. Males had a median income of $29,457 versus $20,579 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,507. About 14.7% of families and 18.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.0% of those under age 18 and 23.3% of those age 65 or over.

Education

Almost all of the city of New Albany is served by the New Albany School District while small portions are in the Union County School District. [8]

The city is the location of a satellite campus of Northeast Mississippi Community College located at 301 North Street.

The New Albany High School Bulldogs boys basketball team won consecutive state Class 3A titles in 1985, [9] 1986, [10] and 1987. [11] Former NBA player John Stroud coached the 1987 team. [12]

Transportation

New Albany is bisected by Interstate 22 (US Highway 78).

New Albany is connected to Ripley in the North and Pontotoc to the South by State Highway 15. Highway 30 connects New Albany and Oxford to the West and Booneville to the Northeast, although when traveling from Oxford towards Booneville an alternate route must be taken within the city limits.

New Albany is served by BNSF Railway (formerly St. Louis – San Francisco Railway) and the Ripley and New Albany Railroad (formerly Gulf, Mobile and Ohio). The two railroads cross downtown.

New Albany was once a stop for Gulf, Mobile and Ohio's famous "Rebel" streamlined passenger train.

The town serves as the northern terminus of the Tanglefoot Trail, a major rail-trail within the state.

Notable people

See also

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References

  1. "2020 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 24, 2022.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. "Negro Confesses to Attacking Girl and is Burned at Stake". The Bristol Herald Courier. Bristol, Tennessee. September 21, 1925 via newspapers.com.
  4. "The Lynching of L.Q. Ivy". New Albany Gazette. New Albany, Mississippi. October 18, 2000.
  5. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  6. "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved 2021-12-08.
  7. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  8. "2020 CENSUS - SCHOOL DISTRICT REFERENCE MAP: Union County, MS" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau . Retrieved 2022-07-31. - Text list
  9. Spencer, Bill (10 Mar 1985). "New Albany captures 3A crown". Clarion-Ledger. p. D1. Retrieved 3 September 2022.
  10. Harden, Clay (9 Mar 1986). "New Albany makes Stroud proud". Clarion-Ledger. p. 9D. Retrieved 3 September 2022.
  11. Barber, Doug (15 Mar 1987). "New Albany gives Stone a hot Foote". Sun Herald. p. D1.
  12. "East Mississippi (h)ires John Stroud". Sun Herald. 30 Apr 1988. p. D4. Retrieved 3 September 2022. East Mississippi Junior College in Scooba accounced Friday the hiring of John Stroud as the new head basketball coach. Stroud has been coach at New Albany High School for the past three years, two of which he carried his team to the state Class 3-A basketball finals.