Richmond (Yorks) (UK Parliament constituency)

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Coordinates: 54°24′18″N1°39′11″W / 54.405°N 1.653°W / 54.405; -1.653

Contents

Richmond (Yorks)
County constituency
for the House of Commons
RichmondYorks2007Constituency.svg
Boundary of Richmond (Yorks) in North Yorkshire
EnglandNorthYorkshire.svg
Location of North Yorkshire within England
County 1585–1974 North Riding of Yorkshire
1974– North Yorkshire
Electorate 83,219 (December 2019) [1]
Major settlements Bedale, Catterick, Catterick Garrison, Great Ayton, Hawes, Leyburn, Middleham, Northallerton, Richmond, Stokesley
Current constituency
Created 1885
Member of Parliament Rishi Sunak (Conservative)
Number of membersOne
1585–1885
Number of members1585–1868: Two
1868–1885: One
Type of constituency Borough constituency

Richmond (Yorks) is a constituency [note 1] in North Yorkshire represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since May 2015 by Rishi Sunak, the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and leader of the Conservative Party. [note 2] [2]

Constituency profile

The constituency presents itself as a safe seat for the Conservative Party, which held it continuously since 1910 (if including the 11 years by the allied Unionist Party from 1918), and in the 2010 general election, Richmond produced the largest numerical and percentage majority for a Conservative, 62.8% of the vote. The Conservative MP and one-time Party leader William Hague held the seat from a by-election in 1989 until he retired from the Commons in 2015. He had held the posts of Leader of the Opposition (1997–2001), Foreign Secretary (2010–2014) and Leader of the House of Commons (2014–2015). His successor Rishi Sunak served as Chancellor of the Exchequer from February 2020 to July 2022 and as Prime Minister from October 2022, while Hague's predecessor Leon Brittan served as Home Secretary. The constituency has thus produced three consecutive MPs who served in the Great Offices of State and two who served as Leader of the Conservative Party.

The constituency consists of in the west the entire Richmondshire district and in the east the northern part of Hambleton District. It is a mostly rural seat with an affluent population. [note 3]

History

Richmond was one of the parliamentary boroughs in the Unreformed House of Commons that dates to the middle of its long existence, first being represented in 1585. In modern times it has been an ultra-safe seat for the Conservative Party.

From 1983, the seat was represented by the cabinet minister Leon Brittan, after boundary changes saw his Cleveland and Whitby seat abolished; however, he resigned from the Commons in December 1988 in order to take up the position of vice-president of the European Commission.

1989 by-election

The ensuing by-election, held in February 1989, was won by William Hague: this was the last by-election won by a Conservative candidate during the Conservative Government of 1979–1997. Hague's win has been attributed in part to the decision by the remnants of the Social Democratic Party (those members that objected to the merger with the Liberal Party the previous year) to contest the election as well as the newly merged Social and Liberal Democrats (who subsequently renamed themselves the Liberal Democrats). The SDP candidate, local farmer Mike Potter, came second, and Hague's majority of 2,634 was considerably smaller than the number of votes (11,589) for the SLD candidate Barbara Pearce. Despite the Labour landslide of 1997, they did not come close to winning the seat, which stayed Conservative with a majority of 10,000. Hague retained the seat at every general election from then on, building the Conservative majority to 23,336, until his decision to step down at the 2015 election.

1992 change in main opposition candidate

In 1992, the Labour candidate until a few weeks before the election, David Abrahams, was deselected after a series of rows within the local party over his personal life and business interests. It emerged in 2007 that he used the name "David Martin" when dealing with tenants in his various rental properties in the Newcastle area, [3] and that he had claimed that he lived with his wife and son, though he had never been married. Divorcee Anthea Bailey later told a local newspaper she and her 11-year-old son had posed as Mr Abrahams' family as part of a business arrangement so that Abrahams could create "the right impression". [4] [5]

Since 2001

At the 2001 general election, Richmond became the Conservatives' safest seat in the UK, both in terms of the actual numerical majority and by percentage, the seat being held by William Hague, then the Conservative leader. Although the numerical majority was surpassed by Buckingham at the 2005 election, Richmond has a smaller electorate and had a greater proportion of Conservative voters so retained the second largest percentage majority. Again in 2010, Richmond was the safest Conservative seat in the country, in terms of numerical and percentage majority. It has been represented since May 2015 by Rishi Sunak, the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and leader of the Conservative Party. [2]

Boundaries

Richmond (Yorks) (UK Parliament constituency)
Map of current boundaries

1918–1950: The Borough of Richmond, the Urban Districts of Kirklington-cum-Upsland, Masham, and Northallerton, and the Rural Districts of Aysgarth, Bedale, Croft, Leyburn, Northallerton, Reeth, Richmond, Startforth, and Stokesley.

1950–1955: The Borough of Richmond, the Urban District of Northallerton, and the Rural Districts of Aysgarth, Croft, Leyburn, Masham, Northallerton, Reeth, Richmond, Startforth, and Stokesley.

1955–1974: As prior but with redrawn boundaries.

1974–1983: As prior but with redrawn boundaries.

1983–1997: The District of Richmondshire, and the District of Hambleton wards of Appleton Wiske, Bedale, Brompton, Broughton and Greenhow, Carlton Miniott, Crakehall, Great Ayton, Hillside, Leeming, Leeming Bar, Morton-on-Swale, Northallerton North East, Northallerton South East, Northallerton West, Osmotherley, Romanby, Romanby Broomfield, Rudby, Sowerby, Stokesley, Swainby, Tanfield, The Cowtons, The Thorntons, Thirsk, Topcliffe, and Whitestonecliffe.

1997–2010: The District of Richmondshire, and the District of Hambleton wards of Appleton Wiske, Brompton, Broughton and Greenhow, Great Ayton, Leeming Bar, Morton-on-Swale, Northallerton North East, Northallerton South East, Northallerton West, Osmotherley, Romanby, Romanby Broomfield, Rudby, Stokesley, Swainby, and The Cowtons.

2010–present: The District of Richmondshire, and the District of Hambleton wards of Bedale, Brompton, Broughton and Greenhow, Cowtons, Crakehall, Great Ayton, Leeming, Leeming Bar, Morton-on-Swale, Northallerton Broomfield, Northallerton Central, Northallerton North, Osmotherley, Romanby, Rudby, Stokesley, Swainby, and Tanfield.

The Richmond constituency covers the Richmondshire district and the northern part of the Hambleton District. It is an affluent rural area with a significant commuter population, covering parts of the North York Moors and Yorkshire Dales National Parks, including Wensleydale and Swaledale. It contains the market towns of Northallerton, Richmond, Leyburn, Bedale, Hawes, and Stokesley, along with Great Ayton and other surrounding villages. It also includes the large army base Catterick Garrison.

Members of Parliament

MPs 1585–1640

ParliamentFirst memberSecond member
1584 John Pepper Marmaduke Wyvill [6]
1586 Robert Bowes Samuel Coxe [6]
1588 James Dale John Smythe [6]
1593 Talbot Bowes John Pepper [6]
1597 Marmaduke Wyvill Cuthbert Pepper [6]
1601 Cuthbert Pepper Talbot Bowes [6]
1604 Sir John Savile Richard Percevall
1614 Sir Talbot Bowes Sir William Richardson
1621 Sir Talbot Bowes William Bowes
1624 John Wandesford Christopher Pepper
1625 Christopher Wandesford Sir Talbot Bowes
1626 Christopher Wandesford Matthew Hutton
1628 Sir Talbot Bowes James Howell
1629–1640No Parliaments summoned

MPs 1640–1868

YearFirst member [7] First partySecond member [7] Second party
April 1640 Sir William Pennyman, Bt. Royalist Maulger Norton
November 1640 Sir Thomas Danby Royalist
August 1642Pennyman disabled to sit
(Pennyman died August 1643)
September 1642Danby disabled to sit
1645 Thomas Chaloner Francis Thorpe
1653Richmond was unrepresented in Barebone's Parliament
1654 John Wastal Richmond had only one seat in the First and
Second Parliaments of the Protectorate
1656 John Bathurst
January 1659 Sir Christopher Wyvill, Bt. John Bathurst
May 1659 Thomas Chaloner Francis Thorpe
April 1660 James Darcy Sir Christopher Wyvill, Bt.
1661 Sir John Yorke Joseph Cradock
1662 John Wandesford
1664 Sir William Killigrew
1665 Marmaduke Darcy
1679 Humphrey Wharton Thomas Cradock
1681 John Darcy, Lord Conyers
1685 Thomas Cradock
January 1689 Thomas Yorke
February 1689 Philip Darcy
1690 Sir Mark Milbanke, Bt Theodore Bathurst
1695 Thomas Yorke Sir Marmaduke Wyvill, Bt.
1698 James Darcy
1701 John Hutton
1702 James Darcy
May 1705 Wharton Dunch
December 1705 William Walsh
1708 Harry Mordaunt
1710 John Yorke Whig
1713 Thomas Yorke
1717 John Yorke Whig
1720 Richard Abell Whig
1722 Conyers Darcy Whig
1727 Charles Bathurst Sir Marmaduke Wyvill, Bt.
1728 [8] John Yorke Whig Sir Conyers Darcy [9] Whig
1747 Earl of Ancram
1757 Thomas Yorke
1761 Sir Ralph Milbanke
1763 Thomas Dundas
March 1768 Alexander Wedderburn Sir Lawrence Dundas, Bt [10]
November 1768 William Norton
1769 Charles John Crowle
1774 Thomas Dundas [11] Sir Lawrence Dundas, Bt [12]
January 1775 Charles Dundas
December 1775 William Norton
1780 Marquess of Graham Sir Lawrence Dundas, Bt
1781 George Fitzwilliam
1784 The Earl of Inchiquin Charles Dundas
1786 Sir Grey Cooper
1790 Lawrence Dundas Whig
1796 Charles George Beauclerk
1798 Arthur Shakespeare Whig [13]
1802 George Dundas Whig [13]
1806 Charles Lawrence Dundas Whig [13]
1808 Lawrence Dundas Whig [13]
1810 Robert Chaloner Whig [13]
January 1812 George Dundas Whig
October 1812 Dudley Long North Whig [13]
1818 Thomas Dundas Whig [13] [14] [15] Viscount Maitland Whig [13]
1820 Samuel Barrett Moulton Barrett Whig [13]
1828 Hon. Sir Robert Dundas Whig [13] [16] [17]
1830 Hon. John Dundas Whig [13] [18] [15] [19]
1835 Alexander Speirs Whig [13] [14] [15] Hon. Thomas Dundas [20] Whig [13] [14] [15]
1839 Hon. Sir Robert Dundas Whig [13] [16] [17]
February 1841 Hon. George Wentworth-FitzWilliam Whig [13] [21] [22] [23]
June 1841 Hon. John Dundas Whig [13] [18] [15] [19] Hon. William Ridley-Colborne Whig [13] [19] [24]
1846 Henry Rich Whig [25] [13] [14] [26]
1847 Marmaduke Wyvill Whig [25]
1859 Liberal Liberal
1861 Sir Roundell Palmer Liberal
1865 Hon. John Dundas Liberal
1866 Marmaduke Wyvill Liberal

MPs since 1868

Richmond, 1918-1948, shown within the North Riding of Yorkshire. RichmondConstituency1918.gif
Richmond, 1918–1948, shown within the North Riding of Yorkshire.
ElectionMember [7] Party
1868 Sir Roundell Palmer Liberal
1872 by-election Lawrence Dundas Liberal
1873 by-election Hon. John Dundas Liberal
1885 Sir Frederick Milbank, Bt Liberal
1886 George Elliot [27] Conservative
1895 John Hutton Conservative
1906 Francis Dyke Acland Liberal
Jan 1910 Hon. William Orde-Powlett Conservative
1918 Sir Murrough Wilson Unionist
1929 Thomas Dugdale Conservative
1959 Timothy Kitson Conservative
1983 Leon Brittan Conservative
1989 by-election William Hague Conservative
2015 Rishi Sunak Conservative

Elections

Rishi Sunak Official portrait of Rishi Sunak crop 2 (cropped).jpg
Rishi Sunak

Elections in the 2010s

General election 2019: Richmond (Yorks) [28] [29]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Rishi Sunak 36,693 63.6 ―0.3
Labour Thomas Kirkwood9,48316.4―7.0
Liberal Democrats Philip Knowles6,98912.1+6.2
Green John Yorke2,5004.3+1.2
Yorkshire Laurence Waterhouse1,0771.9―1.8
Independent Nick Jardine9611.7New
Majority27,21047.2+6.7
Turnout 57,70369.9―0.6
Conservative hold Swing +3.3

General election 2017: Richmond (Yorks) [30] [31]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Rishi Sunak 36,458 63.9 +12.5
Labour Dan Perry13,35023.4+10.2
Liberal Democrats Tobie Abel3,3605.9―0.5
Yorkshire Chris Pearson2,1063.7New
Green Fiona Yorke1,7393.1―1.2
Majority23,10840.5+4.3
Turnout 57,01370.5+5.8
Conservative hold Swing +1.2

General election 2015: Richmond (Yorks) [32] [33]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Rishi Sunak 27,744 51.4 ―11.4
UKIP Matthew Cooke8,19415.2New
Labour Mike Hill 7,12413.2―2.1
Liberal Democrats John Harris3,4656.4―12.7
Independent John Blackie3,3486.2New
Green Leslie Rowe2,3134.3+1.5
Independent Robin Scott1,8113.4New
Majority19,55036.2―7.5
Turnout 53,99964.7―2.5
Conservative hold Swing ―13.3
William Hague William Hague (2010).jpg
William Hague

General election 2010: Richmond (Yorks) [34] [35]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative William Hague 33,541 [note 4] 62.8 +3.5
Liberal Democrats Lawrence Meredith10,20519.1+2.2
Labour Eileen Driver8,15015.3−5.3
Green Leslie Rowe1,5162.8−0.3
Majority23,33643.7+4.1
Turnout 53,41267.2+2.6
Conservative hold Swing +4.4

Elections in the 2000s

General election 2005: Richmond (Yorks) [37]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative William Hague 26,722 59.1 +0.2
Labour Neil Foster8,91519.72.2
Liberal Democrats Jacquie Bell7,98217.70.2
Green Leslie Rowe1,5813.5New
Majority17,80739.4+2.3
Turnout 45,20065.02.4
Conservative hold Swing +1.2
General election 2001: Richmond (Yorks) [38]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative William Hague 25,951 58.9 +10.0
Labour Co-op Fay Tinnion9,63221.95.9
Liberal Democrats Thomas Forth7,89017.90.5
Monster Raving Loony Boney Steniforth5611.3New
Majority16,31937.0+15.9
Turnout 44,03467.46.0
Conservative hold Swing +8.0

Elections in the 1990s

General election 1997: Richmond (Yorks) [39]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative William Hague 23,326 48.9 13.0
Labour Co-op Steven Merritt13,27527.8+16.2
Liberal Democrats Jane Harvey8,77318.47.3
Referendum Alex Bentley2,3675.0New
Majority10,05121.115.1
Turnout 47,74173.45.0
Conservative hold Swing 13.9
General election 1992: Richmond (Yorkshire) [40] [41]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative William Hague 40,202 61.9 +0.7
Liberal Democrats George Irwin16,69825.71.3
Labour Ross Cranston 7,52311.60.2
Independent A. Michael Barr5700.9New
Majority23,50436.2+2.0
Turnout 64,99378.4+6.3
Conservative hold Swing +1.0

Elections in the 1980s

Richmond by-election, 1989
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative William Hague 19,543 37.2 -24.0
SDP Mike Potter16,90932.2New
SLD Barbara Pearce11,58922.1-4.9
Labour Frank Robson2,5914.9-6.9
Green Robert Upshall1,4732.8New
Monster Raving Loony Screaming Lord Sutch 1670.3New
Independent Anthony Millns1130.2New
Corrective Party Lindi St Clair 1060.2New
Liberal Nicholas Watkins700.1New
Majority2,6345.0-29.2
Turnout 52,56164.4-7.7
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1987: Richmond (Yorks) [42]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Leon Brittan 34,995 61.2 -1.4
Liberal David Lloyd-Williams15,41927.0-0.7
Labour Frank Robson6,73711.8+2.1
Majority19,57634.2-0.7
Turnout 57,15172.1+3.4
Conservative hold Swing -0.3
General election 1983: Richmond (Yorks) [43]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Leon Brittan 32,373 62.6
Liberal D. Raw14,30727.7
Labour Co-op Barbara Hawkins4,9979.7
Majority18,06634.9
Turnout 51,67768.7-3.4
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1970s

General election 1979: Richmond (Yorks)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Timothy Kitson 28,958 61.5 +4.6
Liberal G. Hodgson9,96421.1-2.3
Labour Ken Bratton8,17317.4-2.3
Majority18,99440.4+6.9
Turnout 47,09572.1-3.4
Conservative hold Swing +3.5
General election October 1974: Richmond (Yorks)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Timothy Kitson 23,156 56.9 -1.3
Liberal P. Waudby9,52823.4-1.9
Labour Ian Wilkie8,02519.7+3.2
Majority13,62833.5+0.6
Turnout 40,70965.7-9.8
Conservative hold Swing +0.6
General election February 1974: Richmond (Yorks)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Timothy Kitson 26,994 58.2 -4.6
Liberal Elizabeth May Graham11,72725.3-0.9
Labour Edward Pearce 7,65916.5-9.7
Majority15,26732.9-3.7
Turnout 46,38075.5+7.1
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1970: Richmond (Yorks)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Timothy Kitson 30,471 62.8 +6.2
Labour Michael Aldrich 12,70226.2+1.6
Liberal John R. Smithson5,35411.0-7.8
Majority17,76936.6+4.5
Turnout 48,52768.4-2.9
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1960s

General election 1966: Richmond (Yorks)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Timothy Kitson 23,541 56.6 -2.3
Labour W. Patrick Lisle10,21024.6+3.9
Liberal Clifford Keith Wain Schellenberg 7,82418.8-1.6
Majority13,33132.0-6.2
Turnout 41,57571.3-4.3
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1964: Richmond (Yorks)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Timothy Kitson 25,345 58.9 -16.5
Labour Gordon A. Knott8,90820.7-3.9
Liberal Clifford Keith Wain Schellenberg 8,78720.4New
Majority16,43738.2-12.7
Turnout 43,04075.6+4.1
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1950s

General election 1959: Richmond (Yorks)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Timothy Kitson 28,27075.44
Labour Mabel McMillan9,20324.56
Majority19,06750.88
Turnout 37,47371.49
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1955: Richmond (Yorks)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Thomas Dugdale 24,97973.57
Labour Richard Hoyle8,97426.43
Majority16,00547.14
Turnout 33,95367.25
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1951: Richmond (Yorks)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Thomas Dugdale 26,23170.62
Labour Richard Hoyle10,91529.38
Majority15,31641.24
Turnout 37,14674.36
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1950: Richmond (Yorks)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Thomas Dugdale 22,99959.20
Labour F.W. Beaton8,69422.38
Liberal Douglas Eugene Moore7,15718.42
Majority14,30536.82
Turnout 38,85074.36
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1940s

General election 1945: Richmond (Yorks)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Thomas Dugdale 18,33252.87-24.1
Liberal M.W. Darwin9,42727.19New
Labour George Henry Metcalfe6,10417.60-5.1
Common Wealth Roy Norman Chesterton8132.34New
Majority8,90525.68-28.6
Turnout 34,67668.38+0.3
Conservative hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1930s

General election 1935: Richmond (Yorks)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Thomas Dugdale 25,08877.03
Labour Alfred Jonathan Best7,36922.70New
Majority17,71954.33
Turnout 32,45768.10
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1931: Richmond (Yorks)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Thomas Dugdale Unopposed N/AN/A
Conservative hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1920s

General election 1929: Richmond (Yorks) [44]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist Thomas Dugdale 19,763 57.5 N/A
Liberal John Dixon Hinks14,63442.5New
Majority5,12915.0N/A
Turnout 34,39779.4N/A
Unionist hold Swing N/A
General election 1924: Richmond (Yorks) [44]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist Murrough Wilson Unopposed N/AN/A
Unionist hold Swing N/A
General election 1923: Richmond (Yorks) [44]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist Murrough Wilson Unopposed N/AN/A
Unionist hold Swing N/A
General election 1922: Richmond (Yorks) [44]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist Murrough Wilson Unopposed N/AN/A
Unionist hold Swing N/A

Election results 1868–1918

Elections in the 1860s

General election 1868: Richmond (Yorks) [45]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Roundell Palmer 375 81.2 N/A
Liberal William Henry Roberts8718.8N/A
Majority28862.4N/A
Turnout 46271.1N/A
Registered electors 650
Liberal hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1870s

Palmer resigned after being appointed Lord Chancellor and being elevated to the peerage, becoming Lord Selborne.

By-election, 7 Nov 1872: Richmond (Yorks) [45]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Lawrence Dundas 314 57.9 -42.1
Independent Liberal Charles Edward Brunskill Cooke [46] [47] 22842.1New
Majority8615.8N/A
Turnout 54279.5N/A
Registered electors 682
Liberal hold Swing N/A

Dundas succeeded to the peerage, becoming Earl of Zetland.

By-election, 27 May 1873: Richmond (Yorks) [45]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal John Dundas Unopposed
Liberal hold
General election 1874: Richmond (Yorks) [45]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal John Dundas 313 54.7 N/A
Independent Liberal Charles Edward Brunskill Cooke25945.3N/A
Majority549.453.0
Turnout 57281.0+9.9
Registered electors 706
Liberal hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1880s

General election 1880: Richmond (Yorks) [45]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal John Dundas 447 75.8 +21.1
Conservative George Swinburne-King [48] 14324.2New
Majority30451.6+42.2
Turnout 59084.8+3.8
Registered electors 696
Liberal hold Swing N/A
General election 1885: Richmond (Yorks) [12] [49] [50]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Frederick Milbank 4,869 53.0 22.8
Conservative George Elliot 4,32047.0+22.8
Majority5496.045.6
Turnout 9,18981.83.0
Registered electors 11,237
Liberal hold Swing 22.8
General election 1886: Richmond (Yorks) [12] [49]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative George Elliot 4,810 55.5 +8.5
Liberal Edmund Turton 3,85944.5-8.5
Majority95111.0N/A
Turnout 8,66977.14.7
Registered electors 11,237
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +8.5

Elections in the 1890s

General election 1892: Richmond (Yorks) [12] [49]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative George Elliot 4,340 50.9 -4.6
Liberal Edmund Turton 4,18149.1+4.6
Majority1591.8-9.2
Turnout 8,52179.9+2.8
Registered electors 10,669
Conservative hold Swing -4.6
Hutton John Hutton (Conservative).jpg
Hutton
General election 1895: Richmond (Yorks) [12] [49] [51]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative John Hutton 4,555 53.4 +2.5
Liberal Edmund Turton 3,97146.6-2.5
Majority5846.8+5.0
Turnout 8,52679.90.0
Registered electors 10,669
Conservative hold Swing +2.5

Elections in the 1900s

Howard Geoffrey Howard 1906 transparent.png
Howard
General election 1900: Richmond (Yorks) [49] [51] [52]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative John Hutton 4,573 59.5 +6.1
Liberal Geoffrey Howard 3,11740.56.1
Majority1,45619.0+12.2
Turnout 7,69074.25.7
Registered electors 10,369
Conservative hold Swing +6.1
Acland Francis Acland.jpg
Acland
General election 1906: Richmond (Yorks) [12] [49] [52]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Francis Dyke Acland 4,470 50.6 +10.1
Conservative Lawrence Dundas 4,36849.4-10.1
Majority1021.2N/A
Turnout 8,83887.4+13.2
Registered electors 10,112
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +10.1

Elections in the 1910s

General election January 1910: Richmond (Yorks) [12] [53]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative William Orde-Powlett 5,246 55.8 +6.4
Liberal Francis Dyke Acland 4,16344.26.4
Majority1,08311.6N/A
Turnout 9,40989.7+2.3
Registered electors 10,485
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +6.4
General election December 1910: Richmond (Yorks) [12] [53]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative William Orde-Powlett Unopposed
Conservative hold

General Election 1914–15:

Another General Election was required to take place before the end of 1915. The political parties had been making preparations for an election to take place and by July 1914, the following candidates had been selected;

General election 1918: Richmond (Yorks) [44]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
C Unionist Murrough Wilson 9,85766.8N/A
National Farmers Union William Parlour4,90733.2New
Majority4,95033.6N/A
Turnout 14,76448.1N/A
Unionist hold Swing N/A
Cindicates candidate endorsed by the coalition government.

Election results 1832–1868

Elections in the 1830s

General election 1832: Richmond (Yorks) [13] [45]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Whig Robert Lawrence Dundas Unopposed
Whig John Dundas Unopposed
Registered electors 273
Whig hold
Whig hold
General election 1835: Richmond (Yorks) [13] [45]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Whig Thomas Dundas Unopposed
Whig Alexander Speirs Unopposed
Registered electors 278
Whig hold
Whig hold
General election 1837: Richmond (Yorks) [13] [45]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Whig Thomas Dundas Unopposed
Whig Alexander Speirs Unopposed
Registered electors 272
Whig hold
Whig hold

Dundas succeeded to the peerage, becoming 2nd Earl of Zetland and causing a by-election.

By-election, 12 March 1839: Richmond (Yorks) [13] [45]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Whig Robert Lawrence Dundas 162 66.9
Conservative Miles Thomas Stapleton, 8th Baron Beaumont8033.1
Majority8233.8
Turnout 24285.2
Registered electors 284
Whig hold

Elections in the 1840s

Speirs resigned by accepting the office of Steward of the Chiltern Hundreds, causing a by-election.

By-election, 16 February 1841: Richmond (Yorks) [45] [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Whig George Wentworth-FitzWilliam Unopposed
Registered electors 276
Whig hold
General election 1841: Richmond (Yorks) [45] [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Whig John Dundas Unopposed
Whig William Ridley-ColborneUnopposed
Registered electors 276
Whig hold
Whig hold

Colborne's death caused a by-election.

By-election, 8 April 1846: Richmond (Yorks) [45]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Whig Henry Rich Unopposed
Whig hold

Rich was appointed a Lord Commissioner of the Treasury, causing a by-election.

By-election, 13 July 1846: Richmond (Yorks) [45]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Whig Henry Rich Unopposed
Whig hold
General election 1847: Richmond (Yorks) [45]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Whig Marmaduke Wyvill Unopposed
Whig Henry Rich Unopposed
Registered electors 283
Whig hold
Whig hold

Elections in the 1850s

General election 1852: Richmond (Yorks) [45]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Whig Marmaduke Wyvill Unopposed
Whig Henry Rich Unopposed
Registered electors 243
Whig hold
Whig hold
General election 1857: Richmond (Yorks) [45]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Whig Marmaduke Wyvill Unopposed
Whig Henry Rich Unopposed
Registered electors 342
Whig hold
Whig hold
General election 1859: Richmond (Yorks) [45]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Marmaduke Wyvill Unopposed
Liberal Henry Rich Unopposed
Registered electors 327
Liberal hold
Liberal hold

Elections in the 1860s

Rich's resignation caused a by-election.

By-election, 9 July 1861: Richmond (Yorks) [45]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Roundell Palmer Unopposed
Liberal hold

Palmer was appointed Attorney General for England and Wales, causing a by-election.

By-election, 17 October 1863: Richmond (Yorks) [45]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Roundell Palmer Unopposed
Liberal hold
General election 1865: Richmond (Yorks) [45]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Roundell Palmer Unopposed
Liberal John Dundas Unopposed
Registered electors 316
Liberal hold
Liberal hold

Dundas' death caused a by-election.

By-election, 6 March 1866: Richmond (Yorks) [45]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Marmaduke Wyvill 213 94.2 N/A
Liberal William Henry Roberts [54] 13 5.8 N/A
Majority20088.4N/A
Turnout 22671.5N/A
Registered electors 316
Liberal hold Swing N/A

Pre-1832 election results

Elections in the 1830s

General election 1830: Richmond (Yorks) [13] [55]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Whig Robert Lawrence Dundas Unopposed
Whig John Dundas Unopposed
Whig hold
Whig hold
General election 1831: Richmond (Yorks) [13] [55]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Whig Robert Lawrence Dundas Unopposed
Whig John Dundas Unopposed
Registered electors 273
Whig hold
Whig hold

See also

Notes

  1. A county constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years.
  3. The latest 2011 census statistics include minimal percentages of social housing and welfare recipience.
  4. This was the Conservative Party's highest vote share in the 2010 General Election, with William Hague securing 62.8% of the vote. [36]

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