San Bartolomeo all'Isola

Last updated
Basilica of St. Bartholomew on the Island
Basilica di San Bartolomeo all'Isola
Basilica S. Bartholomaei in Insula
San Bartolomeo all'isola September 2015-1.jpg
Façade of San Bartolomeo all'Isola on the Tiber Island
Religion
Affiliation Roman Catholic
Rite Oriental rite
Ecclesiastical or organizational status Minor basilica, Rectory church
LeadershipCardinal Blase Joseph Cupich [1]
Year consecrated10th Century
Location
Location Tiber Island, Rome, Italy
Geographic coordinates 41°53′25″N12°28′42″E / 41.89028°N 12.47833°E / 41.89028; 12.47833 Coordinates: 41°53′25″N12°28′42″E / 41.89028°N 12.47833°E / 41.89028; 12.47833
Architecture
Type Church
Specifications
Direction of façadeNorthwest
Length45 metres (148 ft)
Width22 metres (72 ft)
Width (nave)12 metres (39 ft)
Website
www.sanbartolomeo.org

The Basilica of St. Bartholomew on the Island (Italian : Basilica di San Bartolomeo all'Isola, Latin : Basilica S. Bartholomaei in Insula) is a titular minor basilica, located in Rome, Italy. It was founded in 998 by Otto III, Holy Roman Emperor and contains relics of St. Bartholomew the Apostle. [2] It is located on Tiber Island, on the site of the former temple of Aesculapius, which had cleansed the island of its former ill-repute among the Romans and established its reputation as a hospital, continued under Christian auspices today.

Italian language Romance language

Italian is a Romance language of the Indo-European language family. Italian descended from the Vulgar Latin of the Roman Empire and, together with Sardinian, is by most measures the closest language to it of the Romance languages. Italian is an official language in Italy, Switzerland, San Marino and Vatican City. It has an official minority status in western Istria. It formerly had official status in Albania, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro (Kotor) and Greece, and is generally understood in Corsica and Savoie. It also used to be an official language in the former Italian East Africa and Italian North Africa, where it still plays a significant role in various sectors. Italian is also spoken by large expatriate communities in the Americas and Australia. Italian is included under the languages covered by the European Charter for Regional or Minority languages in Bosnia and Herzegovina and in Romania, although Italian is neither a co-official nor a protected language in these countries. Many speakers of Italian are native bilinguals of both Italian and other regional languages.

A titular church or titulus is a church in Rome assigned or assignable to one of the cardinals, or more specifically to a cardinal priest.

Minor basilica title given to some Roman Catholic churches

A minor basilica is a Catholic church building that has been granted the title of basilica by the Holy See or immemorial custom. Presently, the authorising decree is granted by the Pope through the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments.

Contents

Its Cardinal priest has been Cardinal Blase Cupich since 19 November 2016.

Blase J. Cupich Catholic bishop

Blase Joseph Cupich is an American prelate of the Catholic Church, a cardinal who serves as the ninth archbishop of the Archdiocese of Chicago. He is also a member of the Roman Curia's Congregation for Bishops, which plays a role in advising on bishop appointments and episcopal matters, as well as a member of the Congregation for Catholic Education.

Basilica di San Bartolomeo all'Isola, with the Torre dei Caetani behind Tiber.island.church.rome.arp.jpg
Basilica di San Bartolomeo all'Isola, with the Torre dei Caetani behind

History

In Roman times, the Temple of Aesculapius stood on the site of the modern church. The entire Isola Tiberina had actually been covered in marble in an effort to make the island look like a ship. The prow can still be seen today. [3]

Ancient Rome History of Rome from the 8th-century BC to the 5th-century

In historiography, ancient Rome is Roman civilization from the founding of the Italian city of Rome in the 8th century BC to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century AD, encompassing the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic and Roman Empire until the fall of the western empire. The civilization began as an Italic settlement in the Italian Peninsula, conventionally founded in 753 BC, that grew into the city of Rome and which subsequently gave its name to the empire over which it ruled and to the widespread civilisation the empire developed. The Roman Empire expanded to become one of the largest empires in the ancient world, though still ruled from the city, with an estimated 50 to 90 million inhabitants ) and covering 5.0 million square kilometres at its height in AD 117.

Marble Non-foliated metamorphic rock commonly used for sculpture and as a building material

Marble is a metamorphic rock composed of recrystallized carbonate minerals, most commonly calcite or dolomite. Marble is typically not foliated, although there are exceptions. In geology, the term "marble" refers to metamorphosed limestone, but its use in stonemasonry more broadly encompasses unmetamorphosed limestone. Marble is commonly used for sculpture and as a building material.

Prow forward-most part of a ships bow

The prow is the forward-most part of a ship's bow that cuts through the water. The prow is the part of the bow above the waterline. The terms prow and bow are often used interchangeably to describe the most forward part of a ship and its surrounding parts. In old naval parlance, the prow was the battery of guns placed in the fore gun-deck.

Emperor Otto built this church, which was initially dedicated to his friend Adalbert of Prague. It was renovated by Pope Paschal II in 1113 and again in 1180, after its rededication upon the arrival of the relics of the apostle Bartholomew. The relics were sent to Rome from Benevento, where they had arrived from Armenia in 809. The relics are located within an ancient Roman porphyry bathtub with lions' heads, under the main altar. The marble wellhead bears the figures of the Savior, Adalbert and Bartholomew and Otto III.

Adalbert of Prague Czech Roman Catholic saint, patron saint of Bohemia, Poland, Hungary and Prussia

Adalbert of Prague ; c. 956 – 23 April 997), known in Czech by his birth name Vojtěch, was a Bohemian missionary and Christian saint. He was the Bishop of Prague and a missionary to the Hungarians, Poles, and Prussians, who was martyred in his efforts to convert the Baltic Prussians to Christianity. He is said to be the composer of the oldest Czech hymn Hospodine, pomiluj ny and Bogurodzica, the oldest known Polish hymn, but his authorship of it has not been confirmed. St. Adalbert was later declared the patron saint of the Czech Republic, Poland, and the former polity of Prussia. He is also the patron saint of the Archdiocese of Esztergom.

Pope Paschal II pope

Pope Paschal II, born Ranierius, was pope from 13 August 1099 to his death in 1118.

Translation (relic) movement of a holy relic from one location to another

In Christianity, the translation of relics is the removal of holy objects from one locality to another ; usually only the movement of the remains of the saint's body would be treated so formally, with secondary relics such as items of clothing treated with less ceremony. Translations could be accompanied by many acts, including all-night vigils and processions, often involving entire communities.

The church was badly damaged by a flood in 1557 and was reconstructed, with its present Baroque façade, in 1624, to designs of Orazio Torriani. Further restorations were undertaken in 1852. The interior of the church preserves fourteen ancient Roman columns and two lion supports that date from the earliest reconstruction of the basilica.

Baroque architecture Building style of the Baroque era

Baroque architecture is a highly decorative and theatrical style which appeared in Italy in the early 17th century and gradually spread across Europe. It was originally introduced by the Catholic church, particularly by the Jesuits, as a means to combat the Reformation and the Protestant church with a new architecture that inspired surprise and awe. It reached its peak in the High Baroque (1625–1675), when it was used in churches and palaces in Italy, Spain, Portugal and France, and Austria. In the Late Baroque period (1675–1750), it reached as far as Russia and the Spanish and Portuguese colonies in Latin America, Beginning in about 1730, an even more elaborately decorative variant called Rococo appeared and flourished in Central Europe.

Orazio Torriani Italian architect

Orazio Torriani was an architect and sculptor who worked in Rome.

The inscriptions found in S. Bartolomeo, a valuable source illustrating the history of the Basilica, have been collected and published by Vincenzo Forcella. [4]

In 2000, San Bartolomeo was dedicated by Pope John Paul II to the memory of the new martyrs of the 20th and 21st century.

Exterior

In the center of the piazzetta before the church is a four-sided guglia with saints in niches by the sculptor Ignazio Jacometti, erected here in 1869.

The 12th-century tower near the church, the Torre dei Caetani , is all that remains of the medieval castello erected on the island by the Pierleoni.

Interior

San Bartolomeo houses the memorial to new martyrs of the 20th and 21st century, which was dedicated by Pope John Paul II in 2000. This memorial is taken care of by the Community of Sant'Egidio, who also painted the icon on the main altar. One of the relics that are kept as part of the memorial is the piece of rock that was used in 1984 to kill Blessed Jerzy Popiełuszko. [5]

List of Cardinal priests

San Bartolomeo all'Isola was established as a titulus (Titulus S. Bartholomaei in Insula) of a Cardinal Priest by Pope Leo X on 6 July 1517. [6] The current holder of the title is Cardinal Blase J. Cupich, Archbishop of Chicago.

Related Research Articles

San Clemente al Laterano Minor Roman Catholic basilica in Rome

The Basilica of Saint Clement is a Roman Catholic minor basilica dedicated to Pope Clement I located in Rome, Italy. Archaeologically speaking, the structure is a three-tiered complex of buildings: (1) the present basilica built just before the year 1100 during the height of the Middle Ages; (2) beneath the present basilica is a 4th-century basilica that had been converted out of the home of a Roman nobleman, part of which had in the 1st century briefly served as an early church, and the basement of which had in the 2nd century briefly served as a mithraeum; (3) the home of the Roman nobleman had been built on the foundations of republican era villa and warehouse that had been destroyed in the Great Fire of 64 AD.

Tiber Island island in Tiber river near Rome

The Tiber Island is the only island in the part of the Tiber which runs through Rome. Tiber Island is located in the southern bend of the Tiber.

Santa Maria in Trastevere church

The Basilica of Santa Maria in Trastevere ; English: Our Lady in Trastevere) is a titular minor basilica in the Trastevere district of Rome, and one of the oldest churches of Rome. The basic floor plan and wall structure of the church date back to the 340s, and much of the structure to 1140-43. The first sanctuary was built in 221 and 227 by Pope Callixtus I and later completed by Pope Julius I. The church has large areas of important mosaics from the late 13th century by Pietro Cavallini.

Santa Prassede medieval church in Rome

The Basilica of Saint Praxedes, commonly known in Italian as Santa Prassede, is an ancient titular church and minor basilica located near the papal basilica of Saint Mary Major, on Via di Santa Prassede, 9/a in rione Monti of Rome, Italy. The current Cardinal Priest of Titulus Sancta Praxedis is Paul Poupard.

Churches of Rome Wikimedia list article

There are more than 900 churches in Rome, including some notable Roman Catholic Marian churches. Most, but not all, of these are Roman Catholic.

Santa Croce in Gerusalemme Church in Rome, Italy

The Basilica of the Holy Cross in Jerusalem or Basilica di Santa Croce in Gerusalemme, is a Roman Catholic minor basilica and titular church in rione Esquilino, Rome, Italy. It is one of the Seven Pilgrim Churches of Rome.

San Martino ai Monti church building in Rome, Italy

San Martino ai Monti, officially known as Santi Silvestro e Martino ai Monti("SS Sylvester & Martin in the Mountains"), is a minor basilica in Rome, Italy, in the Rione Monti neighbourhood. It is located near the edge of the Parco del Colle Oppio, near the corner of Via Equizia and Viale del Monte Oppio, about five to six blocks south of Santa Maria Maggiore.

Santa Cecilia in Trastevere 5th-century church in Rome

Santa Cecilia in Trastevere is a 5th-century church in Rome, Italy, in the Trastevere rione, devoted to the Roman martyr Saint Cecilia.

San Marco Evangelista al Campidoglio, Rome Church in Rome, Italy

San Marco is a minor basilica in Rome dedicated to St. Mark the Evangelist located in the small Piazza di San Marco adjoining Piazza Venezia. It was first built in 336 by Pope Mark, whose remains are in an urn located below the main altar. The basilica is the national church of Venice in Rome.

Santi Nereo e Achilleo church in Roma, Italy

Santi Nereo e Achilleo is a fourth-century basilica church in Rome, Italy, located in via delle Terme di Caracalla in the rione Celio facing the main entrance to the Baths of Caracalla. The Cardinal Priest of the Titulus Ss. Nerei et Achillei was Theodore Edgar McCarrick until his resignation from the cardinalate on 28 July 2018.

San Vitale, Rome church

The Basilica of Sts. Vitalis, Valeris, Gervase and Protase is a titular minor basilica church in Rome. The Roman Catholic church is commonly named Basilica di San Vitale. The Cardinal Priest of the Titulus S. Vitalis is Adam Maida.

San Lorenzo in Damaso basilica church in Rome, Italy

The Minor Basilica of St. Lawrence in Damaso or simply San Lorenzo in Damaso is a parish and titular church in central Rome, Italy that is dedicated to St. Lawrence, deacon and martyr. It is incorporated into the Palazzo della Cancelleria, which enjoys the extraterritoriality of the Holy See.

SantAndrea delle Fratte church building in municipio I, Italy

Sant'Andrea delle Fratte is a 17th-century basilica church in Rome, Italy, dedicated to St. Andrew. The Cardinal Priest of the Titulus S. Andreae Apostoli de Hortis is Ennio Antonelli.

San Silvestro in Capite church

The Basilica of Saint Sylvester the First, also known as, is a Roman Catholic minor basilica and titular church in Rome dedicated to Pope Saint Sylvester I. It is located on the Piazza San Silvestro, at the corner of Via del Gambero and the Via della Mercede, and stands adjacent to the central Post Office.

Santa Francesca Romana, Rome Church in Italy

Santa Francesca Romana, previously known as Santa Maria Nova, is a Roman Catholic church situated next to the Roman Forum in the rione Campitelli in Rome, Italy,

San Pancrazio church

The church of San Pancrazio is a Roman Catholic ancient basilica and titular church founded by Pope Symmachus in the 6th century in Rome, Italy. It stands in via S. Pancrazio, westward beyond the Porta San Pancrazio that opens in a stretch of the Aurelian Wall on the Janiculum.

SantAngelo in Pescheria church

Sant'Angelo in Pescheria or in Piscaria is a church in Rome. It dates from the 8th century. "In Pescheria" refers to its location close to the fish market built in the ruins of the ancient Porticus Octaviae.

Santa Maria in Traspontina church building in Rome, Italy

Santa Maria in Traspontina is a Carmelite church in Rome, Italy. The shrine lies on the Via della Conciliazione, the main road of the Rione Borgo.

Santi Giovanni e Paolo al Celio titular church in Rome

The Basilica of Saints John and Paul on the Caelian Hill is an ancient basilica church in Rome, located on the Caelian Hill.

Santi Apostoli, Rome church

Santi Dodici Apostoli, commonly known simply as Santi Apostoli, is a 6th-century Roman Catholic parish and titular church and minor basilica in Rome, Italy, dedicated originally to St. James and St. Philip whose remains are kept here, and later to all Apostles. Today, the basilica is under the care of the Conventual Franciscans, whose headquarters in Rome is in the adjacent building.

References

  1. "Titular churches and diaconates of the new cardinals, 19.11.2016" (Press release). Holy See Press Office. 19 November 2016. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  2. S. Prete, "Reliquie e culto di S. Bartolomeo ap. dal Medio Oriente a Roma all'Isola Tiberina", Studi e Ricerche sull'Oriente Cristiano, Rome 5.3 (1982:173-181)
  3. "Isola Tiberina Is Adorably Tiny, Old & Roman". The Huffington Post. Huffington Post. 31 January 2014. Retrieved 17 February 2014.
  4. V. Forcella, Inscrizioni delle chese e d' altre edifici di Roma, dal secolo XI fino al secolo XVI Volume IV (Roma: Fratelli Bencini, 1874), pp. 527-540.
  5. "Father Popieluszko in Rome pantheon of modern martyrs". thenews.pl . Polskie Radio S.A. 12 August 2012. Retrieved 6 September 2012.
  6. David M. Cheney, Catholic-Hierarchy: San Bartolomeo all'Isola. Retrieved: 03/09/2016.

Further reading