Tarbuck knot

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Tarbuck knot
TarbuckKnot.JPG
Category Running
Efficiency32%
Origin Kenneth Tarbuck
Releasing Non-jamming
Typical use Climbing (obsolete)
CaveatThe knot grips adequately, but under sudden stress will slide to a limited extent thus reducing shock loading.

The Tarbuck knot was developed by Kenneth Tarbuck for use by climbers, and was primarily used with stranded nylon ropes before the advent of kernmantle ropes made this use both unnecessary and unsafe. [1] It is used when the rope is subject to heavy or sudden loads, as it will slide to a limited extent thus reducing shock. The knot is non-jamming.

Contents

History

Kenneth Tarbuck was an avid climber and skier and developed the Tarbuck knot around 1952. [1]

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The Blake's hitch is a friction hitch commonly used by arborists and tree climbers as an ascending knot. Unlike other common climbing hitches, which often use a loop of cord, the Blake's hitch is formed using the end of a rope. Although it is a stable knot, it is often backed up with a stopper knot, such as a figure-of-eight knot, for safety. It is used for both ascending and descending, and is preferred by many arborists over other hitches, such as the taut-line hitch, as it is less prone to binding.

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Tarbuck may refer to:

References

See also