Nail knot

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Nail knot
Nail knot.svg
Category Bend
Typical usefly fishing

The nail knot, also known as the tube knot or gryp knot, is mostly used in carp and fly-fishing. The nail knot was named because a nail was inserted as a guide when threading the line. Today, it is easier to use a small straw. The nail knot is an important fishing knot used to join two lines of different diameters and allows for line diameters to diminish down to the fly. I.E., it is useful for attaching your backing to the fly line, and your fly line to the leader, or tippet. The knot can be tied in multiple ways and is uniform.

Fly fishing

Fly fishing is an angling method in which an artificial "fly" is used to catch fish. The fly is cast using a fly rod, reel, and specialized weighted line. Casting a nearly weightless fly or "lure" requires casting techniques significantly different from other forms of casting. Fly fishermen use hand tied flies that resemble natural invertebrates, baitfish, other food organisms, or "lures" to provoke the fish to strike.

Most common uses in fly-fishing are attaching the leader to the fly line and attaching the fly line to the backing. Fly-fishing is an angling method in which an artificial "fly" is used to catch fish. The fly is cast using a fly rod, reel, and specialized weighted line. Casting a nearly weightless fly or "lure" requires casting techniques significantly different from other forms of casting. Fly fishermen use hand-tied flies that resemble natural invertebrates or other food organisms, or "lures" to provoke the fish to strike. Carp anglers use the nail knot to attach monofilament-fishing line and/or braided fishing line to lead core leader material.

Fishing lure

A fishing lure is a type of artificial fishing bait which is designed to attract a fish's attention. The lure uses movement, vibration, flash and color to bait fish. Many lures are equipped with one or more hooks that are used to catch fish when they strike the lure. Some lures are placed to attract fish so a spear can be impaled into the fish or so the fish can be captured by hand. Most lures are attached to the end of a fishing line and have various styles of hooks attached to the body and are designed to elicit a strike resulting in a hookset. Many lures are commercially made but some are hand made such as fishing flies. Hand tying fly lures to match the hatch is considered a challenge by many amateur entomologists.

Carp species of fish

Carp are various species of oily freshwater fish from the family Cyprinidae, a very large group of fish native to Europe and Asia.

To tie the nail knot by hand is very difficult; therefore some anglers use a nail knot-tying tool. It is one of those deceptively simple, clever, useful, and easy to use tools that many seem to own. This tool also seems to fly "under the radar" in terms of public awareness. It allows fishermen to tie any size monofilament, fluorocarbon line or fishing braid to any size fishhook, fishing lure or lead core in just seconds. With it you can tie various knots, but it is best known for the nail/gryp knot. It can't come untied because the untied end is gripped by all the turns of the knot. This knot will not slip, even if you make a hair loop on a carp hair rig, as the tag end goes under all the wraps.

How To Tie the Nail Knot

  1. Lay a nail or hollow tube against the end of a fly line. Set the butt section end of a leader against the line and tube. Leave an extra 10–12″ of its tag end to tie the knot.
  2. Make 6–8 close together wraps, working left to right, back around the leader, line and tube or nail. Pass the tag end through the tube or the spaces made by the nail and remove the tube.
  3. Pull tag end to snug up the coils, then tag end and leader to seat the knot firmly onto the fly line.
  4. Trim tag end close to the knot.

See also

Related Research Articles

Trolling (fishing)

Trolling is a method of fishing where one or more fishing lines, baited with lures or bait fish, are drawn through the water. This may be behind a moving boat, or by slowly winding the line in when fishing from a static position, or even sweeping the line from side-to-side, e.g. when fishing from a jetty. Trolling is used to catch pelagic fish such as salmon, mackerel and kingfish.

Fishing rod tool

A fishing rod is a long, flexible rod used to catch fish. At its simplest, a fishing rod is a simple stick or pole attached to a line ending in a hook. The length of the rod can vary between 2 and 20 feet. To entice fish, bait or lures are impaled on one or more hooks attached to the line. The line is generally stored on a reel which reduces tangles and assists in landing a fish.

Fishing reel device attached to a fishing rod used in winding and unwinding fishing line

A fishing reel is a cylindrical device attached to a fishing rod used in winding and stowing line.

Fishing line thin flexible string or line intended for angling

A fishing line is a cord used or made for angling. Fishing line is generally as durable as and comparable to a string. Important parameters of a fishing line are its length, material, and weight. Factors that may determine what line an angler chooses for a given fishing environment include breaking strength, knot strength, UV resistance, castability, limpness, stretch, abrasion resistance, and visibility. Most modern lines are made from nylon or silk.

Blood knot bend knot

A blood knot is most usefully employed for joining sections of monofilament nylon line while maintaining a high portion of the line's inherent strength. Other knots used for this purpose can cause a substantial loss of strength. In fly fishing, this serves to build a leader of gradually decreasing diameter with the castable fly line attached at the large diameter end and the fly or hook at the small diameter end. The principal drawback to the blood knot is the dexterity required to tie it. It is also likely to jam, which is not a concern in fishing line, which is no great loss to cut, but may be a concern in normal rope. "Blood knot" may refer to, "a double overhand knot tied in a cat-o'-nine-tails."

The barrel knot, called blood knot by Keith Rollo, is the best bend there is for small, stiff or slippery line. The ends may be trimmed short and the knot offers the least resistance possible when drawn through water.

Monofilament fishing line fishing line made of a single filament of synthetic fiber

Monofilament fishing line is fishing line made from a single fiber of plastic. Most fishing lines are now monofilament because monofilament fibers are cheap to produce and are produced in a range of diameters which have different tensile strengths. Monofilament line is also manufactured in different colors, such as clear, white, green, blue, red, and fluorescent.

Casting (fishing) act of throwing bait or a lure using a fishing rod, reel, and line

In angling, casting is the act of throwing bait or a lure using a fishing line out over the water using a flexible fishing rod. The usual technique is for the angler to quickly flick the rod from behind toward the water. The term may also be used for setting out a net.

Albright special bend knot

The Albright special or Albright knot is a bend used in angling. It is a strong knot used to tie two different diameters of line together, for instance to tie monofilament to braid. The Albright is relatively smooth and passes through guides when required. Some anglers coat the knot with a rubber based cement to make it even smoother and more secure.

Bimini twist

The Bimini twist is a fishing knot used for offshore trolling and sportsfishing and the creation of double-line leaders. A Bimini twist creates a loop at the end of the line in which it is tied. The loop secured at the top with a long barrel of coiled line created by the tying process. A Bimini twist loop is stronger than the line itself. It is one of the rare knots that does not weaken the line in which it is tied. It is a simple method of doubling your fishing line in order to prevent chafing or to create the necessary loop in order to attach a wind-on leader without using strength in the mainline. For use in fishing applications, the old stand by is 20-30 initial twists in nylon monofilament and 60 or more initial-twists in Spectra-type braided line.

Palomar knot

The Palomar knot is a knot that is used for securing a fishing line to a fishing lure, snap or swivel.

Fishing tackle equipment used for fishing

Fishing tackle is the equipment used by anglers when fishing. Almost any equipment or gear used for fishing can be called fishing tackle. Some examples are hooks, lines, sinkers, floats, rods, reels, baits, lures, spears, nets, gaffs, traps, waders and tackle boxes.

Braided line was one of the earliest types of fishing line, and in its modern incarnations it is still very popular in some situations because of its high knot strength, lack of stretch, and great overall power in relation to its diameter. Braids were originally made from natural fibers such as cotton and linen, but natural fiber braids have long since been replaced by braided or woven fibers of a man-made materials like Dacron, Spectra or micro-dyneema into a strand of line. Braided fishing lines have low resistance to abrasion, sharp objects can easily cut braided line. Their actual breaking strength will commonly well exceed their pound-test rating.

Multifilament line, also referred to as The Super Lines, is a type of fishing line. It is a braided line which is made up of a type of polyethylene, an extremely thin line for its strength. By weight, polyethylene strands are five to ten times sturdier than steel. Multifilament line is similar to braided dacron in terms of sensitivity but a diameter about one-third that of monofilament.

Fly fishing tackle comprises the fishing tackle or equipment typically used by fly anglers. Fly fishing tackle includes:

Uni knot

The uni knot is a multi purpose fishing knot that can be used for attaching the fishing line to the arbor of a reel, for joining lines, and for attaching lures, snaps, and swivels.

Tenkara fishing

Tenkara fly fishing is a simple type of fishing practiced in Japan. Primarily used for mountain stream trout fishing, tenkara is one of the most popular methods of angling among fresh-water mountain anglers in Japan.

The Trilene knot is a multi purpose fishing knot that can be used for attaching monofilament line to hooks, swivels and lures. It resists slippage and failures. Developed by professional anglers Jimmy Houston and Ricky Green in the late 1970s, the knot evolved out of experimentation during promotional events for Trilene, a fishing line manufacturer. Both men favored the idea of naming the knot after themselves, though Trilene ultimately applied its own name.

Furled leaders are a type of knotless tapered fly fishing leader. They are known for their high performance, low memory, and soft fly presentations. These attributes are due to the way these leaders are constructed which is similar to creating rope. The big difference is that furled leaders are created with a taper. This twisted style of construction and being made from many filaments leads to a flexible leader with low to no memory. Properties similar to a section of rope.

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