Bimini twist

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Bimini twist
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The Bimini twist [1] is a fishing knot used for offshore trolling and sportsfishing and the creation of double-line leaders. A Bimini twist creates a loop at the end of the line in which it is tied. The loop secured at the top with a long barrel of coiled line created by the tying process. A Bimini twist loop is stronger than the line itself. It is one of the rare knots that does not weaken the line in which it is tied.[ citation needed ] It is a simple method of doubling your fishing line in order to prevent chafing or to create the necessary loop in order to attach a wind-on leader without using strength in the mainline. For use in fishing applications, the old stand by is 20-30 initial twists in nylon monofilament and 60 or more initial-twists in Spectra-type braided line.

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An article in Sportfishing Magazine in February 2007 made the claim that fewer twists created greater strength. However, the holding mechanism in a Bimini Twist is the friction created by the twists. It was quickly and has since been often demonstrated that the 12-twist knot (proposed in the article) in Spectra-braid slipped before breaking.[ citation needed ] It is not known what testing errors led to the erroneous conclusion that fewer twists made a stronger knot.

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References

  1. The complete guide to knots and knot tying — Geoffrey Budworth — p.201 ISBN   0-7548-0422-4